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I am performing a CSS transform: rotate on a parent, yet would like to be able to negate this effect on some of the children - is it possible without using the reverse rotation?

Reverse rotation does work, but it affects the position of the element, and it may have a negative performance impact (?). In any case, it doesn't look like a clean solution.

I tried the "transform: none" suggestion from this question prevent children from inheriting transformation cs3, yet it simply doesn't work - please see the fiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/NPC42/XSHmJ/

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I believe that you are going to need to fake it using a second child, the spec does not seem to allow for the behaviour you would like, and I can understand why the position of a child element has to be affected by a transform to it's parent.

This isn't the most elegant of solutions, but I think you're trying to do something that the spec is never going to allow. Take a look at the following fiddle for my solution:

http://jsfiddle.net/wx7rt/


<div class="parent">
  <div class="child1"></div>
  <div class="child2"></div>
</div>

.parent {
  position: relative;
  width: 200px;
  height: 150px;
  margin: 70px;
}

.child1 {
  background-color: yellow;
  width: 200px;
  height: 150px;   
  -webkit-transform: rotate(30deg);
  -moz-transform: rotate(30deg);
  -o-transform: rotate(30deg);
  -ms-transform: rotate(30deg);
  transform: rotate(30deg);
}

.child2 {
  position: absolute;
  top: 30px;
  left: 50px;
  background-color: green;
  width: 70px;
  height: 50px;
}
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It looks like you didn't update the fiddle before sharing (it still shows my code), but I understand the idea. Thanks, it is not very clean, but still simple enough for me to like it :) If there is no better solution proposed, I'll 'accept' this answer. –  NPC Mar 1 '12 at 9:55
    
The fiddle should now be updated –  michaelward82 Mar 1 '12 at 11:28
    
@michaelward82 the fiddle still is not updated. Updates change the url. –  Fresheyeball Aug 23 '12 at 0:15
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May be you have to write like this:

.child {
    position: absolute;
    top: 30px;
    left: 50px;
    background-color: green;
    width: 70px;
    height: 50px;
    -webkit-transform: rotate(-30deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(-30deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(-30deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(-30deg);
    transform: rotate(-30deg);
}

Check this for more http://jsfiddle.net/XSHmJ/1/

UPDATED

You can sue :after & :before psuedo class for this.

check this http://jsfiddle.net/XSHmJ/4/

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This is what I meant by the reverse rotation. It makes the position of the child very non-obvious, so I can't really use this solution. Thanks for the help, though! –  NPC Mar 1 '12 at 9:54
    
Check my updated fiddle –  sandeep Mar 1 '12 at 9:58
    
I like the :after solution, really cool, but will work only if the rotated element is a very simple object which can be "created" by pure CSS. Still, a very nice idea, may come in handy one day, thanks! –  NPC Mar 1 '12 at 12:59
    
+1 for :after solution –  Cameron A May 29 '13 at 23:39
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