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It's easy to create and initialize a struct...

struct S{ int x; bool b; };

S s = {123,false};

But is it possible to use the same trick on an existing object? Or is this a 1-time only thing?

   S s = {123,false};
   s = {456,true}; //fails
   s = S(){456,true}; //fails

Is there a syntax trick... obviously I could do:

   S s = {123,false};
   S temp={456,true};
   s = temp;

But can I remove explicitly declaring the temp variable?

I should add I'm working on VC++ 2008, so no fancy modern C++ stuff is available :(

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No. Initialization is a one time occurrence. Initialization occurs only when you create as well as assign some values to the created object at the same time (i.e., in one statement0.

Once the object is created you can only assign new values to it.

In short,
You can't reinitialise anything in C++. You can initialise objects or you can assign them.

Once you understand this fact, you can see that there are number of solutions possible such as

  • passing the structure members to the constructor & creating the structure object of it
  • overloading the =operator to do whatever you want
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I don't have a ctor or an operator=... I know I can do those things but this question is specifically seeking an alternative. –  John Mar 1 '12 at 10:02
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You could add a constructor to your struct and then you could do something like:

struct S
{
    S(int x_in, bool b_in): x(x_in), b(b_in) { }
    int x;
    bool b;
}

S s(123, false);
s = S(456, true);
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In c++11 you can:

s = S({456, true});
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In C++11, an you can construct a temporary from an initializer list and use it with assignment operator. Thus you can write:

struct S {
    int x;
    bool b;
};

int main()
{
    S s = {42, true};
    s = {0, false};
}
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I dont think struct would support re initialization by default.

 S s = {123,false};
   S temp={456,true};
   s = temp; //calls the = operator

Maybe you could try overloading the assignment operator

Or you can try creating temp on the fly.

 S s = {123,false};

   s = S (456,true); // this should work i suppose
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s = S (456,true); unless S has a ctor, that doesn't work. –  John Mar 1 '12 at 10:31
    
Yeah is that to be specially mentioned? its creating temporary variable and requires constructor to be called. –  Rohit Mar 1 '12 at 10:32
    
If my struct has a ctor, the entire point of my question doesn't exist in the first place. –  John Mar 1 '12 at 11:32
    
And if your struct doesnt have a ctor then the answer to the question also doesnt exist! unless you are on c++11 –  Rohit Mar 1 '12 at 11:36
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