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Is it possible to filter out differen sorts of exceptions out of my debug output in C#? I want to filter out 'System.FormatException', because I know its going to occur, and it gives a rubbish oversight of my output. I'm scanning a textfile with over 20000 lines, and almost a quarter of them are wrong, but I don't want 5000 times the 'System.FormatException' in my output ..

Code seen below, and you can see, if it's not a number, he will not double.parse, so he will catch the error

Thanks in advance!

 if (!(dataline.EndsWith(";0") || intCounter == 0))
                {

                    try
                    {
                        natMB = double.Parse(splitline[8], NumberStyles.AllowDecimalPoint, NumberFormatInfo.InvariantInfo);
                    }
                    catch 
                    {
                        natMB = 0;

                    }
                    double intMB;
                    try
                    {
                        intMB = double.Parse(splitline[9], NumberStyles.AllowDecimalPoint, NumberFormatInfo.InvariantInfo);
                    }
                    catch 
                    {
                        intMB = 0;
share|improve this question
    
Wouldn't it be better to validate the input going into the function, in my humble opinion catching an error to validate user input is not ideal. A simple RegEx could do a numerical validation for you. – Liath Mar 1 '12 at 10:50
    
I agree. It would be better to fix the input instead of catching an error. – beta Mar 1 '12 at 10:52
    
I added the code that i'm using – Dashzapp Mar 1 '12 at 10:53
up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you'd like to ignore an exception you could just put the following try/catch over it:

try
{
  // Insert your code here
}
catch(System.FormatException)
{

}

Seeing your code I recommend you to use

double d = 0;
Boolean success = double.TryParse(splitline[8], out d);

if(success)
  Console.WriteLine("Conversion successful!");
else
  Console.WriteLine("Damnit.");

instead. This will return a boolean on whether the conversion went fine or not and also will store the parsed double in the variable you passed the function.

share|improve this answer
    
I am doing that, but It still shows up in my output. I'm try catching wrong data (punctuations, words, ... while they should be numbers), and replacing them by 0. – Dashzapp Mar 1 '12 at 10:48
    
It would be easier to help you if you posted some code. ;) – beta Mar 1 '12 at 10:49
1  
Personally I log every error. In this case I'd try and prevent the error than throw away the logging. In my experience some of the hardest bugs to find and fix in a live environment are the ones with bad logging. – Liath Mar 1 '12 at 10:54
1  
@Dashzapp then use TryParse instead of Parse as beta sugests. Also it will improve your performance, as exceptions are known to work long in .net – Archeg Mar 1 '12 at 10:56
    
debugging ... To Liath: I'm logging every other in an errorlogwriter with detailed information. – Dashzapp Mar 1 '12 at 10:57

I find the built in .NET logging mechanisms frustrating for this sort. I would take a look at something like Log4Net or NLog which give you a large amount of control over what level is logged and in which namespaces.

Combine these with Log2Console for a live logging trace

share|improve this answer
    
To clarify I believe @beta 's answer is correct in this situation because it prevents the error occurring - even better solution. In the situation when you want to filter out errors which have been reported and to filter which are logged take a look at these technologies. – Liath Mar 1 '12 at 11:10

If you want to ignore this exception while debugging, you can disable the catch of the exception.

In the menus, go: Debug > Exceptions... (in my Visual Studio, the hotkeys are CTRL+D,E)

Then click on "Find...", and search your exception. When you found it, make sure none of the checkboxes are checked. Should ignore it now.

share|improve this answer

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