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I have an XSD file that I use to validate some XML data, and on my own PC this works perfectly. However when on a computer without a network, it fails with this error

Server was unable to process request. ---> Type 'http://schemas.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2004/sqltypes:nvarchar' is not declared, or is not a simple type.

Yet this works perfectly elsewhere.

The start of my XSD file is as follows

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<xsd:schema xmlns:schema="DataLoad" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"     xmlns:sqltypes="http://schemas.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2004/sqltypes" elementFormDefault="qualified">
<xsd:import namespace="http://schemas.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2004/sqltypes" schemaLocation="http://schemas.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2004/sqltypes/sqltypes.xsd" />

After some research, I've tried changed the schemaLocation attribute to

schemaLocation="http://schemas.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2004/sqltypes ./bin/sqlTypes.xsd"

Apparently, that should load from ./bin/sqlTypes.xsd then (I saved a local copy of the MS one to ./bin/sqlTypes.xsd

But now, I get this error...

Server was unable to process request. ---> Cannot load the schema from the location 'http://schemas.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2004/sqltypes ./bin/sqltypes.xsd' - The root element of a W3C XML Schema should be and its namespace should be 'http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema'..

I'm new to XML Schemas and still trying to get my head around this.

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2 Answers 2

OK, it looks like schemaLocation has a different syntax in that context (crazy, right?). Normally, it takes "$namespace $address" (i.e. two arguments, separated by a space - actually, a list of such pairs), as you say.

But in an <import> element, there is a special attribute for namespace (called namespace), and the schemaLocation now contains the address only. Does that make any sense? No. Here's what I think it means for your example:

<xsd:import namespace="http://schemas.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2004/sqltypes"
  schemaLocation="./bin/sqlTypes.xsd" />

Here's the spec defining <import>, and the schemaLocation is clearly just an uri: http://www.w3.org/TR/2004/REC-xmlschema-1-20041028/structures.html#composition-schemaImport

For comparison, here is the definition of <xsi:schemaLocation> (note the "xsi" - it's in a different namespace, so they can have different definitions, it's just that it's unnecessarily confusing to use the same name): http://www.w3.org/TR/2004/REC-xmlschema-1-20041028/structures.html#xsi.schemaLocation

The xml schema "primer" also distinguishes between these uses: http://www.w3.org/TR/xmlschema-0/#schemaLocation

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The Schema location attribute contains pairs of values "namespace" followed by "schema location".

On your local machine your application seems able to magically resolve the schema from just namespace "http://schemas.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2004/sqltypes/sqltypes.xsd" and load the schema (or it does no validation). I would need to know how its loading the XML files to determine how this namespace to schema location mapping is performed.

Note although the namespace "http://schemas.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2004/sqltypes/sqltypes.xsd" looks like a url it is just a token, and does not directly tell the parser where the schema is.

Adding the "./bin/sqlTypes.xsd" tells the parser it can load the file from a relative path from the XML file being loaded. For this to work the XSD file (and all its imports/includes) need to be at this location, I'm guessing there not?

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The file was in the correct location, unless my line schemaLocation="http://schemas.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2004/sqltypes ./bin/sqlTypes.xsd" was not formatted correctly? -- So far the only way to resolve it was to alter the customers firewall to allow the server to connect outbound. –  Elarys May 9 '12 at 15:58

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