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I have a dataframe such as:

lat lon var01 var02 var03 var04 var11 var12 var13 var14 ...

and another one like:

lat lon var05 var15 var25 ...

The required output is:

lat lon var01 var02 var03 var04 var05 var11 var12 var13 var14 var15 ...

I thought this would be easy in R, but I haven't found any way so far. I'm also open to solutions in other languages like bash. I would also like to have only a few lines of code, I know how to do it with loops and such.

Thanks in advance

Edit: The following solution requires that the columns are named correctly. Imagine the following situation:

d1 <- data.frame(lat = 1:10, lon = 1:10, V11 = runif(10), V12 = rnorm(10), V21 = runif(10), V22 = rnorm(10)) 
d2 <- data.frame(lat = 1:10, lon = 1:10, A13 = runif(10), A23 = rnorm(10)) 
res <- merge(d1, d2, sort = FALSE) 
res <- res[, c(1:2, order(colnames(res[, -(1:2)])) + 2)] 

The output is

lat lon        A13        A23        V11        V12        V21        V22
 10  10 0.21269952  0.2670988 0.87532133 -0.6887557 0.60493329 -0.1350546
  1   1 0.61464497 -0.5686687 0.91287592 -0.4149946 0.23962942  0.3981059
  2   2 0.55715954 -0.1351786 0.29360337 -0.3942900 0.05893438 -0.6120264
  3   3 0.32877732  1.1780870 0.45906573 -0.0593134 0.64228826  0.3411197
  4   4 0.45313145 -1.5235668 0.33239467  1.1000254 0.87626921 -1.1293631
  5   5 0.50044097  0.5939462 0.65087047  0.7631757 0.77891468  1.4330237
  6   6 0.18086636  0.3329504 0.25801678 -0.1645236 0.79730883  1.9803999  
  7   7 0.52963060  1.0630998 0.47854525 -0.2533617 0.45527445 -0.3672215
  8   8 0.07527575 -0.3041839 0.76631067  0.6969634 0.41008408 -1.0441346
  9   9 0.27775593  0.3700188 0.08424691  0.5566632 0.81087024  0.5697196

and the required output is:

lat lon V11 V12 A13 V21 V22 A13
share|improve this question
    
It's not clear what your question is. Do you want to know how to merge two data frames? Doesn't look like it, since your question uses a merge example. Do you simply want to change the order of the columns? Doesn't look like it either, since your question already uses an example of that. –  Andrie Mar 1 '12 at 11:33
    
I want to merge two data frames but the trick here is that they have "groups" of columns such that the result should be somthing like dataset1 group1 dataset2 group1 dataset1 group2 dataset2 group2 and so on –  skd Mar 1 '12 at 11:36
    
And what is the definition of group and dataset? –  Andrie Mar 1 '12 at 11:38
    
dataset is a data frame and group a group of n columns. It's something like take 4 columns from the first data frame, 1 column from the second put them together (5 columns in the resulting data frame) and repeat until there is no columns left in either. –  skd Mar 1 '12 at 11:45
    
@skd My Answer showed how to do the generic merge and then re-order the columns as per your initial example of data. Now you have moved the goal posts somewhat. If there is a fixed, definite way in which we should order the columns then please do edit your new example to state explicitly how that ordering works. merge() has done all the hard work, you just want the variables in some pre-specified order; we just need the rules to achieve that pre-specified order. –  Gavin Simpson Mar 1 '12 at 14:13
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3 Answers

merge() is a suitable tool for this job. Here is an example:

set.seed(1)
d1 <- data.frame(lat = 1:10, lon = 1:10, V2 = runif(10), V4 = rnorm(10))
d2 <- data.frame(lat = 1:10, lon = 1:10, V1 = runif(10), V3 = rnorm(10))

## merge the data using `lat` and `lon`
res <- merge(d1, d2, sort = FALSE) ## `sort = FALSE` stops R reordering rows

## get columns in right order
res <- res[, c(1:2, order(colnames(res[, -(1:2)])) + 2)]

Which gives:

> res
   lat lon        V1         V2          V3         V4
1    1   1 0.4820801 0.26550866  0.91897737 -0.8204684
2    2   2 0.5995658 0.37212390  0.78213630  0.4874291
3    3   3 0.4935413 0.57285336  0.07456498  0.7383247
4    4   4 0.1862176 0.90820779 -1.98935170  0.5757814
5    5   5 0.8273733 0.20168193  0.61982575 -0.3053884
6    6   6 0.6684667 0.89838968 -0.05612874  1.5117812
7    7   7 0.7942399 0.94467527 -0.15579551  0.3898432
8    8   8 0.1079436 0.66079779 -1.47075238 -0.6212406
9    9   9 0.7237109 0.62911404 -0.47815006 -2.2146999
10  10  10 0.4112744 0.06178627  0.41794156  1.1249309

Update based on revised Q:

## dummy data
set.seed(1)
df3 <- data.frame(matrix(runif(60), ncol = 6))
names(df3) <- paste("df3Var", 1:6, sep = "")
df3 <- cbind.data.frame(lat = 1:10, lon = 1:10, df3)
df4 <- data.frame(matrix(runif(30), ncol = 3))
names(df4) <- paste("df4Var", 1:3, sep = "")
df4 <- cbind.data.frame(lat = 1:10, lon = 1:10, df4)

## merge
res2 <- merge(df3, df4, sort = FALSE)

This gives:

> head(res2)
  lat lon   df3Var1   df3Var2   df3Var3   df3Var4   df3Var5    df3Var6
1   1   1 0.2655087 0.2059746 0.9347052 0.4820801 0.8209463 0.47761962
2   2   2 0.3721239 0.1765568 0.2121425 0.5995658 0.6470602 0.86120948
3   3   3 0.5728534 0.6870228 0.6516738 0.4935413 0.7829328 0.43809711
4   4   4 0.9082078 0.3841037 0.1255551 0.1862176 0.5530363 0.24479728
5   5   5 0.2016819 0.7698414 0.2672207 0.8273733 0.5297196 0.07067905
6   6   6 0.8983897 0.4976992 0.3861141 0.6684667 0.7893562 0.09946616
    df4Var1   df4Var2   df4Var3
1 0.9128759 0.3390729 0.4346595
2 0.2936034 0.8394404 0.7125147
3 0.4590657 0.3466835 0.3999944
4 0.3323947 0.3337749 0.3253522
5 0.6508705 0.4763512 0.7570871
6 0.2580168 0.8921983 0.2026923
> names(res2)
 [1] "lat"     "lon"     "df3Var1" "df3Var2" "df3Var3" "df3Var4" "df3Var5"
 [8] "df3Var6" "df4Var1" "df4Var2" "df4Var3"

OK, so now note the ordering. Assume we want to take variables in groups of 2 from df3 with 1 variable from df4 and within each of df3 and df4 the variables are in the correct order within themselves. For this we need to create an index vector ord that is:

> ord
[1] 1 2 7 3 4 8 5 6 9

which we then add 2 too (to cover the lat and lon columns in the merged data frame)

> ord + 2
[1]  3  4  9  5  6 10  7  8 11

Once you have the sequence, we just need a way to use R's vectorised tools and a tiny bit of math to produce the sequence we want. I build the index up in two stages; i) first I work out where the columns (1:6) + 2 of the merged data frame should be in ord, and then ii) I fill in the remaining spaces with the indexes in the merged data frame of the columns from the second data frame.

ord <- numeric(length = sum(ncol(df3), ncol(df4)) - 4)
ngrps <- 3
ningrps <- 2
## i)
want <- rep(seq_len(ningrps), ngrps) + 
    rep(seq(from = 0, by = 3, length = prod(ngrps, ningrps) / 2), 
        each = ningrps)
ord[want] <- seq_len(prod(ngrps, ningrps))
## ii)
want <- ngrps * seq_len(ngrps)
ord[want] <- seq(to = sum(ncol(df3), ncol(df4)) - 4, by = 1, length = ngrps)
res3 <- res2[, c(1:2, ord+2)]

That gives:

> head(res3)
  lat lon   df3Var1   df3Var2   df4Var1   df3Var3   df3Var4   df4Var2   df3Var5
1   1   1 0.2655087 0.2059746 0.9128759 0.9347052 0.4820801 0.3390729 0.8209463
2   2   2 0.3721239 0.1765568 0.2936034 0.2121425 0.5995658 0.8394404 0.6470602
3   3   3 0.5728534 0.6870228 0.4590657 0.6516738 0.4935413 0.3466835 0.7829328
4   4   4 0.9082078 0.3841037 0.3323947 0.1255551 0.1862176 0.3337749 0.5530363
5   5   5 0.2016819 0.7698414 0.6508705 0.2672207 0.8273733 0.4763512 0.5297196
6   6   6 0.8983897 0.4976992 0.2580168 0.3861141 0.6684667 0.8921983 0.7893562
     df3Var6   df4Var3
1 0.47761962 0.4346595
2 0.86120948 0.7125147
3 0.43809711 0.3999944
4 0.24479728 0.3253522
5 0.07067905 0.7570871
6 0.09946616 0.2026923

which is the ordering you wanted. Now we can cook that into a little function:

myMerge <- function(x, y, ngrps, ningrps, ...) {
    out <- merge(x, y, ...)
    ncols <- ncol(out) - 2
    ord <- numeric(length = ncols)
    want <- rep(seq_len(ningrps), ngrps) + 
        rep(seq(from = 0, by = ngrps, length = prod(ngrps, ningrps) / 2), 
            each = ningrps)
    ord[want] <- seq_len(prod(ngrps, ningrps))
    want <- ngrps * seq_len(ngrps)
    ord[want] <- seq(to = ncols, by = 1, length = ngrps)
    out <- out[, c(1:2, ord+2)]
    out
}

Which when used on df3 and df4 above gives:

> myMerge(df3, df4, ngrps = 3, ningrps = 2, sort = FALSE)
   lat lon    df3Var1   df3Var2    df4Var1    df3Var3   df3Var4   df4Var2
1    1   1 0.26550866 0.2059746 0.91287592 0.93470523 0.4820801 0.3390729
2    2   2 0.37212390 0.1765568 0.29360337 0.21214252 0.5995658 0.8394404
3    3   3 0.57285336 0.6870228 0.45906573 0.65167377 0.4935413 0.3466835
4    4   4 0.90820779 0.3841037 0.33239467 0.12555510 0.1862176 0.3337749
5    5   5 0.20168193 0.7698414 0.65087047 0.26722067 0.8273733 0.4763512
6    6   6 0.89838968 0.4976992 0.25801678 0.38611409 0.6684667 0.8921983
7    7   7 0.94467527 0.7176185 0.47854525 0.01339033 0.7942399 0.8643395
8    8   8 0.66079779 0.9919061 0.76631067 0.38238796 0.1079436 0.3899895
9    9   9 0.62911404 0.3800352 0.08424691 0.86969085 0.7237109 0.7773207
10  10  10 0.06178627 0.7774452 0.87532133 0.34034900 0.4112744 0.9606180
     df3Var5    df3Var6   df4Var3
1  0.8209463 0.47761962 0.4346595
2  0.6470602 0.86120948 0.7125147
3  0.7829328 0.43809711 0.3999944
4  0.5530363 0.24479728 0.3253522
5  0.5297196 0.07067905 0.7570871
6  0.7893562 0.09946616 0.2026923
7  0.0233312 0.31627171 0.7111212
8  0.4772301 0.51863426 0.1216919
9  0.7323137 0.66200508 0.2454885
10 0.6927316 0.40683019 0.1433044

Which is again what you wanted. You could fiddle with the function definition so you don't need to specify both ngrps and ningrps as you can work one out from the other plus the number of columns in df3 - 2. But I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Agree that merge does the trick. –  Andrie Mar 1 '12 at 11:15
    
@skd I don't quite understand your point. merge by default takes the intersection of column names as the common columns. You can, of course, specify something else. –  Andrie Mar 1 '12 at 11:26
    
I edited the main question with an example to clarify what I mean –  skd Mar 1 '12 at 11:29
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Another function for suggestion is cbind(). You can specify how many columns and which one to combine with another dataframe. Check out the help section with great examples: cbind help page

share|improve this answer
    
You would also need to ensure that the rows of the two data frames were in the same order. merge() is safer as it does this all for you. –  Gavin Simpson Mar 1 '12 at 14:16
add comment

You can modify your last line to:

res <- res[, c(1:2, order(sub("[[:alpha:]]+"", colnames(res[, -(1:2)]))) + 2)] 

That (now) handles the multiple alpha characters leading pattern. If your pattern is more complex, then you need to offer an example that illustrates that level of complexity. Regex solutions could easily trim all the leading alphas or all the alpha characters, but we do need to know how complex the real problem is.

share|improve this answer
    
The columns do not have any name, you just take 4 from one data frame and 1 from the other. –  skd Mar 1 '12 at 15:21
    
Of course the columns have names. All dataframes have column names. –  BondedDust Mar 1 '12 at 15:25
    
I mean not any specific name, just the default –  skd Mar 2 '12 at 16:00
    
If they have "default" names then removing the leading letter will succeed. I will modify my grep function to handle longer alpha strings. –  BondedDust Mar 2 '12 at 16:09
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