Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have just watched Chandler's presentation on Clang at Going Native 2012. He presents the following code:

#include <iostream>

struct S{ int n; };
struct X{ X(int) {}; };

void f( void* ) 
{
   std::cerr << "Pointer!\n";
}

void f( X ) 
{
   std::cerr << "X!\n";
}

int main()
{
    f(S().n);
}

Chandler states that this calls f(void*) for c++11 and f(X) for c++03. He also states that the reason is that S().n is default initialised to 0, making it a nullptr constant.

Firstly am I right in assuming that the zero initialization of member variable n is compiler implementation dependent and NOT guaranteed by the standard (or did this change with c++11)? Chandler hints this is due to support for constant expressions but I still cannot fully follow his reasoning.

Secondly why would f(X) be called with C++03 and not c++11? I would of assumed that f(void*) would kick in regardless of the value of S().n over an implicit conversion to X

For Chandler's explanation see the following link, 45 minutes in:

Clang: Defending C++ from Murphy's Million Monkeys

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Firstly am I right in assuming that the zero initialization of member variable n is compiler implementation dependent and NOT guaranteed by the standard (or did this change with c++11)?

No, S() means value initialize in both C++03 and C++11. Though I believe the wording for this is much clearer in C++11 than C++03. In this case, value-initialization forwards to zero-initialization. Contrast this with default-initialization which does not zero:

S s1;  // default initialization
std::cout << s1.n << '\n';  // prints garbage, crank up optimizer to show
S s2 = S();  // value initialization
std::cout << s2.n << '\n';  // prints 0

Secondly why would f(X) be called with C++03 and not c++11? I would of assumed that f(void*) would kick in regardless of the value of S().n over an implicit conversion to X

In C++03 an int can never become a null pointer constant. Once 0 is typed as an int, say by assigning it to an int, then it is forever an int, and not a null pointer constant.

In C++11, S().n is implicitly a constexpr expression with value 0, and a constexpr expression with value 0 can be a null pointer constant.

Finally, this is not an intentional change on the part of the committee as far as I can tell. If you're writing code that depends on this difference, you may well get bitten in the future if/when the committee corrects itself. I would steer well clear of this area. Use it to win bar bets -- not in production code.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you know if a defect report has been filed on this yet? I didn't see any but I might have missed it. –  bames53 Mar 1 '12 at 17:04
    
Thanks, I would never write code like that, just interested after watching Chandler's presentation... –  mark Mar 1 '12 at 17:38
    
Ah NVM I see now that with "an int" you mean "an int variable". I was confused and thought you meant to say that "0" is not an int or that int expressions never can be a null pointer constant. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 1 '12 at 20:35
    
CWG 903 is related, but I don't think that is it. I'm not personally involved on this issue, and have just been eavesdropping on it (and then with only half an ear). And I'll bet Johannes Schuab could describe the situation with much more precise language than I've done. There should be a new CWG issues list out just any day now, and maybe that will have a new issue on it. –  Howard Hinnant Mar 1 '12 at 21:47
    
I'm not personally involved either. But, Richard has recently brought up similar cases, such as "f(g());" when g is defined as "constexpr int g() { return 0; }". IMO the "g()" and "S().n" cases are sufficiently similar, in that both were introduced by C++11 and both are not desirable. In any case, both will be made invalid by resolution of CWG903. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 2 '12 at 9:57

First, some clarification on the rules of initialization for both C++03 and C++11:

// This is default construction
S s;
// s.i has undefined value

// This is initialization from a value-initialized S (C++03 rules)
S s = S();
// s.i has been zero-initialized

// This is value initialization (C++11 rules)
// new syntax, better rules, same result
S s {};
// s.i has been zero-initialized

Then, remember that int is not convertible to void* so in C++03 f(S().n) will never call void f(void*); even if no other declaration of f is available.

What is possible in C++03 is to do f(0), which will call void f(void*); even if void f(X); is present. The reason for this is that the int -> X conversion (a so called user-defined conversion) is not preferred to the zero integral constant -> void* conversion (which isn't a UD conversion). Note that it's also possible to call void f(void*); via f( (int()) ) because int() is also a zero integral constant, even in C++03. (As usual the brackets are here to resolve a syntactical ambiguity.)

What C++11 changes is that now S().n is a zero integral constant. The reason for this is that S() is now a constant expression (thanks to generalized constant expression), and this kind of member access also is.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.