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I want to write a method that uses Reflection to tell whether a given Type implements IList<T>. For example:

IsGenericList(typeof(int))                       // should return false
IsGenericList(typeof(ArrayList))                 // should return false
IsGenericList(typeof(IList<int>))                // should return true
IsGenericList(typeof(List<int>))                 // should return true
IsGenericList(typeof(ObservableCollection<int>)) // should return true

In my usage, I can assume that the type will always be an instantiated generic type (or something that's not generic at all).

Unfortunately, this isn't as easy as it ought to be. The obvious solution:

public bool IsGenericList(Type type)
{
    return typeof(IList<>).IsAssignableFrom(type);
}

doesn't work; it always returns false. Apparently non-instantiated generic types like IList<> don't implement IsAssignableFrom the way I'd expect them to: IList<> is not assignable from List<T>.

I've also tried this:

public bool IsGenericList(Type type)
{
    if (!type.IsGenericType)
        return false;
    var genericTypeDefinition = type.GetGenericTypeDefinition();
    return typeof(List<>).IsAssignableFrom(genericTypeDefinition);
}

I.e., turn type into its non-instantiated generic, like IList<int> -> IList<>, and then try IsAssignableFrom again. That will return true when type is an instantiated IList<T> such as IList<int>, IList<object>, etc. But it returns false for classes that implement IList<T> such as List<int>, ObservableCollection<double>, etc., so apparently IList<> is not assignable from List<>. Again, not what I would expect.

How do I go about writing IsGenericList and making it work as in the above examples?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 20 down vote accepted

In fact, you cannot have an instance of a generic type definition. Therefore, the IsAssignableFrom() method works as expected. To achieve what you want, do the following:

public bool IsGenericList(Type type)
{
    if (type == null) {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("type");
    }
    foreach (Type @interface in type.GetInterfaces()) {
        if (@interface.IsGenericType) {
            if (@interface.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(ICollection<>)) {
                // if needed, you can also return the type used as generic argument
                return true;
            }
        }
    }
    return false;
}

Just out of curiosity, what do you need this for?

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1  
+1 - This works, and is the only solution here that currently does - I just realized you had this after I posted the same thing. –  Reed Copsey Jun 4 '09 at 16:28
    
Never saw @ to use keywords as variable names in any production code before. –  VVS Jun 4 '09 at 16:31
1  
You're missing the { for the method and you used ICollection<> instead of IList<>, but otherwise this works perfectly, thanks! –  Joe White Jun 4 '09 at 17:35
1  
I used this when reflecting over fields and properties on a type and re-setting them back to default values (null for reference types). For Lists I wanted to set them back to empty lists rather than null. –  rohancragg Oct 13 '11 at 16:16
1  
Careful @JoeWhite, if you replace ICollection with IList then IsGenericList(typeof(IList<int>)) will return False. Fix below stackoverflow.com/a/13589104/284795 –  Colonel Panic Nov 27 '12 at 16:56
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I too want to test if a type implements IList<T> for some T. I made the obvious change to Lucero's answer but it caused a subtle bug not present in the original answer. Here's my final edit:

    /// <summary>
    /// Test if a type derives from IList of T, for any T.
    /// </summary>
    public bool TestIfGenericList(Type type)
    {
        if (type == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("type");
        }

        var interfaceTest = new Predicate<Type>(i => i.IsGenericType && i.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(IList<>));

        return interfaceTest(type) || type.GetInterfaces().Any(i => interfaceTest(i));
    }
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Thanks, that's indeed better than the accepted answer as it works for IList<T> itself. –  Cœur Jun 16 at 1:54
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Using this: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.type.findinterfaces.aspx

I tried this:

 public class Test : IList<string>
 {
//implementation left out...
 }

class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Test t = new Test();
            TypeFilter myFilter = new TypeFilter(MyInterfaceFilter);

            Type type = t.GetType();
            Type[] x = type.FindInterfaces(myFilter, "System.Collections.Generic.IList");
            Console.WriteLine(x.Length);

        }

        public static bool MyInterfaceFilter(Type typeObj, Object criteriaObj)
        {
            if (typeObj.ToString().Contains(criteriaObj.ToString()))
                return true;
            else
                return false;
        }
    }
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4  
Using a non-strong-name to identify a type is very unsafe. Anyone can create a type with that name, it doesn't mean that it's the type you want to test for. –  Lucero Jun 4 '09 at 16:31
    
True, you could just replace it with this: Type[] x = type.FindInterfaces(myFilter, typeof(IList<>).FullName); –  Irwin Jun 4 '09 at 18:16
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Have you tried calling Type.GetInterface()? It's not completely clear from the help, but I think that it will search interfaces implemented by base types, in addition to the type itself. If not, you can always loop through Type.BaseType and call GetInterface() again.

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GetInterface only works if you know the specific generic argument, but won't work for IList<T>. –  Reed Copsey Jun 4 '09 at 16:27
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Lucero/Reed Copsey both have the right solution now. Just to make it more concise, here it is in LINQified form:

var isGenericList = type.GetInterfaces().Any(t => t.IsGenericType && 
    t.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(IList<>));
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Won't work, since GetInterfaces() will not return the generic type definitions, only the generic types (such as IList<int>). –  Lucero Jun 4 '09 at 16:23
    
Tested - does not work (it was my first attempt, too). –  Reed Copsey Jun 4 '09 at 16:27
    
Yeah, so it doesn't. I've updated it and it seems to work now however. –  Noldorin Jun 4 '09 at 16:28
    
You can rewrite my solution using Linq if you want... ;) –  Lucero Jun 4 '09 at 16:29
    
I didn't choose Linq because from the question it is only clear that generic are available, not what version of the C# compiler is being used. –  Lucero Jun 4 '09 at 16:37
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This passes your tests ...

public static bool IsGenericList( Type type )
{
  return type.Name == "IList`1" || type.GetInterface( "IList`1" ) != null;
}
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type doesn't have to be generic to implement a generic interface. You can have this: class IntList: object, IList<int> { .... } which doesn't make IntList generic. –  Lucero Jun 4 '09 at 16:27
    
The IsGeneric check is not neccessary at all –  tanascius Jun 4 '09 at 16:33
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Use the "is" operator:

The is operator is used to check whether the run-time type of an object is compatible with a given type.

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I don't have an instance. I have the Type. –  Joe White Jun 4 '09 at 16:18
    
This won't work with IList<>, only with IList<int>, etc. You need to have a concrete type for "is" to work... –  Reed Copsey Jun 4 '09 at 16:19
    
You need an instance for is. The OP asked how to do the check using a Type. –  Oliver Dec 4 '12 at 18:24
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