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I have the following situation:
Client -> router -> Internet -> Dedicated server

Client: On startup, connects to server and keeps connection open. Occasionally receives notifications from the server that files are changed . Starts a sync process, and afterwards notifies the server if this was successfull. May lose its connection at times, so a new connection must be made then.

Server (internet): Contains files which sometimes are changed. Accepts incoming clients, and keeps the tcpclient object for that client. It can never connect directly with a client, because the client sits behind several routers; that's the reason why the connection must be kept open. Notifies the client(s) when a change is made. And also checks for each client for a sync successful message.

Questions:

  1. How do I effectively keep my connection open on the client and server side?

  2. What happens when the client wants to notify the server that the sync process was a success, but at the meantime the server notifies for client for a new update..?

  3. Is it a good practice to just create a Tcpclient (client-side) and keep this object throughout the whole program? And when some network operation failed, try to connect with this tcpclient object again?

I did a lot research but couldn't really find something that keeps using the same tcpclient..

Btw: This is a new thread based on my previous post, were this solution (reuse tcpclient) was proposed(udp packet not coming through)

Greets Daan & thanks in advance for your attention

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

How do I effectively keep my connection open on the client and server side?

TCP sendscan send keep alive messages per default if you activate SO_KEEPALIVE. But it can be a good idea to send your own keep alive messages (to prevent idle connection disconnect in routers etc)

What happens when the client wants to notify the server that the sync process was a success, but at the meantime the server notifies for client for a new update..?

Design your protocol so that is has a Request id and can differ between notifications and replies.

Design your API to be synchronous, but use asynchronous socket handling.

Is it a good practice to just create a Tcpclient (client-side) and keep this object throughout the whole program? And when some network operation failed, try to connect with this tcpclient object again?

Are you sure that it's possible to connect with the same client again? IIRC it's not possible with Socket and the same should apply to TcpClient

I would use the same client as long as it's not getting disconnected.

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If you refer to the SO_KEEPALIVE socket option, it's not enabled by default. If enabled, the default timeout is usually in the order of one keep-alive message every two hour. TCP have no other keep-alive mechanism. –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 1 '12 at 11:58
    
@JoachimPileborg: Thanks. I thought it were on by default. –  jgauffin Mar 1 '12 at 12:01
    
So... HOW do you activate that socket option? –  Nyerguds Jun 25 '13 at 10:30
1  
socket.SetSocketOption(SocketOptionLevel.Tcp,SocketOptionName.KeepAlive,1); –  jgauffin Jun 25 '13 at 11:10
  1. To make sure the connection stays open, and that there is no network failure between client and server, you can add two messages to your protocol: Keep-alive, and keep-alive-reply. Either the client or the server (it's up to you) send a keep-alive message on regular intervals (once a minute maybe) and the other side replies with a keep-alive-reply. If the sender of the keep-alive message has not received a reply when it's time to send the next keep-alive message, then the connection can be considered stale and close the connection. The other end, the one who sends the replies, needs a timer. If a keep-alive request has not been received in the designated time, then it should close the connection.
  2. The client just lets the notifications from the server queue up, and handle them when it can. Either you increase the receive buffer in the client (setsockopt and SO_RCVBUF), or you keep your own queue. To keep track of which "sync-done" message fits with which "do-sync" message, you have to add some kind of message identifier to your messages. This can be a simple integer value, which starts a zero and then the server increases it by one for every "do-sync" message.
  3. As long as you have a working connection, keep the connection object. When the time comes to reconnect I would create a new connection object, just to be safe. But it might work reusing the old one, I don't know C# and the .NET library well enough.
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Heyup Daan. This problem has already been solved in the most recent commit of networkComms.net. It keeps the connection alive by sending a single byte every couple of seconds if it detects no other traffic is being sent. If you take a look at this open source C# network communication library, starting with the 11 line example here, you might be able to get up and running a little faster than creating everything from scratch yourself.

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