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I want to access the vector in the "manipulatevector" function below the same way as i access an array with vector[i] and not vector->at(i) in the code below. I have tried to pass the vector directly, and not a pointer as can be done with arrays. But this seem to corrupt the program. Any ideas how this can be achieved? Im new to using the std library, as i mostly have experience from C.

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#define vectorsize 5
struct st_test {
    int ii;
    float dd;
};

void manipulatevector(std::vector<struct st_test> *test) {
    test->resize(vectorsize);

    for(int i=0;i<vectorsize;i++) {
        test->at(i).dd = i*0.4f;
        test->at(i).ii = i;
    }
}

void manipulatearray(struct st_test test[vectorsize]) {
    for(int i=0;i<vectorsize;i++) {
        test[i].dd = i*0.4f;
        test[i].ii = i;
    }
}

void main() {
    std::vector<struct st_test> test1;
    manipulatevector(&test1);

    struct st_test test2[vectorsize];
    manipulatearray(test2);

    std::cout << "Vector" << std::endl;
    for(int i=0;i<vectorsize;i++) {
        std::cout << test1.at(i).dd << std::endl;
    }

    std::cout << "Array" << std::endl;
    for(int i=0;i<vectorsize;i++) {
        std::cout << test2[i].dd << std::endl;
    }
}
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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Have you tried passing the vector as a reference?

void manipulatevector(std::vector<struct st_test> &test) {
    test.resize(vectorsize);

    for(int i=0;i<vectorsize;i++) {
        test[i].dd = i*0.4f;
        test[i].ii = i;
    }
}

and

std::vector<struct st_test> test1;
manipulatevector(test1);
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You can simply use (*test)[i] instead of test->at(i).

This is not actually the same behavior (at vs operator[]), but you are probably already aware of that.

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Pass it as a reference instead of a pointer.

void manipulatevector(std::vector<struct st_test> &test) {

You then use . instead of ->, and things like the overloaded [] operator are usable.

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Change the signature of void manipulatevector(std::vector<struct st_test> *test) to void manipulatevector(std::vector<struct st_test>& test). Then you can use the operator[] on the vector.

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You can pass the vector by reference and use the [] operator:

void manipulatevector(std::vector<struct st_test>& test) {
    test.resize(vectorsize);

    for(int i=0;i<vectorsize;i++) {
        test[i].dd = i*0.4f;
        test[i].ii = i;
    }
}

When you passed the vector directly, I presume you passed it by value:

void manipulatevector(std::vector<struct st_test> test) {

which meant any changes made inside manipulatevector() would not be seen by the caller. This would mean:

for(int i=0;i<vectorsize;i++) {
    std::cout << test1.at(i).dd << std::endl;
}

would throw a std::out_of_range error, from test.at(i), as test1 would not have vectorsize elements, but zero elements. As there is no exception handling in main() this would have caused the program to crash.

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test->resize(vectorsize); change to test.resize(vectorsize); –  neciu Mar 1 '12 at 12:08
    
@neciu, thanks and done. –  hmjd Mar 1 '12 at 12:10

There are different options here. You can pass the vector by reference, which is the simplest and cleaner in code:

 void function( std::vector<type>& v )

Now, in some shops the style guide requires that if you are going to modify an argument you pass it by pointer as that makes it explicit at the place of call. In that case there are different options to call operator[]:

 void function( std::vector<type> *v ){
    (*v)[0] = ....                     // dereference first
    v->operator[](0) = ....            // explicitly cal the operator
    std::vector<type>& vr =*v;
    vr[0] = ....                       // create reference and use that

The first two are equivalent, with the first being arguably easier to read. The second is equivalent to the first one in that it dereferences the pointer and then accesses the operator, but you are explicitly giving a name to the reference, so it can be reused in the function without having to dereference in all uses. While this technically creates an extra variable, the compiler will most probably optimize the reference away.

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