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Here is a question. Can someone figure out the answer?

Maximum two "if" tests are allowed!

Given numbers from 1 to 100
If this number is divisble by 21 print "foobar"
If this number is divisble by 7 print "bar"
If this number is divisble by 3 print "foo"
If none of the above, print the number

Only one number should be printed. For example, number 21 should only print "foobar", not all "foobar", "bar", "foo".

Can be done in any language.

Many thanks.

share|improve this question
8  
Further reading: Search for FizzBuzz. –  George Duckett Mar 1 '12 at 12:11
2  
Where does the question come from? Is it an interview question? Homework? –  Fredrik Mörk Mar 1 '12 at 12:12
    
Is the restriction only on if's, or on all branching flow control (like switch/case) or the conditional operator? –  George Duckett Mar 1 '12 at 12:14
    
@George Duckett: given the question is language-agnostic, I think you need to restrict any kind of branching/conditional control flow. Otherwise I can just invent a language "French C++", in which I can use the keyword si as many times as I like because it's not if ;-) Then you can have an argument about what a "branch" really is, comparing the logical structure of the code, the actual opcodes emitted by a given compiler, etc, etc. It's an artificial restriction invented by an interviewer in order to provoke a particular answer, which you gave. –  Steve Jessop Mar 1 '12 at 14:26
    
@SteveJessop: Exactly my point :) –  George Duckett Mar 1 '12 at 15:31

8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The trick is that realising of the 4 ifs in your question, we can infer the top and bottom ones based on the middle 2.

for(int i=1;i<=100;i++)
{
    string numberstr = i.ToString();
    if(i % 3 == 0)
    {
        Console.Write("foo");
        numberstr = "";
    }
    if(i % 7 == 0)
    {
        Console.Write("bar");
        numberstr = "";
    }
    Console.WriteLine(numberstr);

}
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If you want to try it out =) jsfiddle.net/TYC9j/19 –  Niklas Mar 1 '12 at 12:50

Ohai, FizzBuzz.

#include <iostream>

int main(){
  for(int i=1; i <= 100; ++i){
    bool foo = !(i % 3), bar = !(i % 7);
    bool num = !(foo || bar);
    foo && std::cout << "foo";
    bar && std::cout << "bar";
    num && std::cout << i;
    std::cout << "\n";
  }
}

Live example on Ideone.

share|improve this answer
    
Oooh, nice one, another with zero if statements. Although it's borderline. No doubt you could do something similar with while (foo) {cout << "foo"; break;} or a ternary :-) They're also technically not if statements. –  paxdiablo Mar 1 '12 at 12:33
    
Actually, I'm pretty sure that whoever invented the question had in mind a for loop containing two "ifs". So, "for" loops definitely don't count as "ifs", and we can have for(int tmp = i; tmp % 3 == 0; ++tmp) std::cout << "foo";. Assuming we think the interviewer will enjoy that kind of thing. –  Steve Jessop Mar 1 '12 at 14:45

I can do this with zero if statements:

array[1..100] = {"1", "2", "foo", "4", "5", "6", "bar", ... "bar", "foo", "100"}
for i = 1 to 100:
    print array[i]

I'll leave it up to you to fill in the ... bit and convert it to a real language. I'd do it myself but I doubt the usefulness of such a task :-)

Or, perhaps even better:

print "1\n2\nfoo\n4\n...97\nbar\nfoo\n100"
share|improve this answer
    
Now this is called cheating ;) –  ScorpiAS Mar 1 '12 at 12:17
4  
To which my response would be "Kobayashi Maru" :-) –  paxdiablo Mar 1 '12 at 12:19
    
In Haskell, you wouldn't need to fill in the ..., nor convert it to a real language. The compiler would devise a language for you and then compile it using that ;) –  Vladislav Zorov Mar 1 '12 at 12:56

A zero if using linq (but cheating really by using the conditional operator).

using System;
using System.Linq;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var lines = from i in Enumerable.Range(1, 100)
                        let foopart = i % 3 == 0 ? "foo" : ""
                        let barpart = i % 7 == 0 ? "bar" : ""
                        let numberpart = i % 3 != 0 && i % 7 != 0 ? i.ToString() : ""
                        select foopart + barpart + numberpart;

            foreach (var line in lines)
                Console.WriteLine();
        }
    }
}
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Code in C

char* x = "\n"; 
int i;
for(i=1;i<=75;i++)
{   
    int y = ((i%5 == 0) && printf("%s","Foo")); 
    y=y+((i%7 == 0) && printf("%s","Bar"));
    ((!y==1) && printf("%d",i));
    printf("%s",x);
}
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Of course, there are 3 conditions, but no IF :) C#

var list = Enumerable.Range(1, 100).Select(n =>
            n % 21 == 0 ? "foobar" :
            n % 7 == 0 ? "bar" :
            n % 3 == 0 ? "foo" : n.ToString());
foreach(var n in list)
{
    Console.WriteLine(n);
}
share|improve this answer

Instead save the result in a string.

Example:

String str = number.toString();

if(number % 7 == 0) str = "FOO";

if(number % 5 == 0) str = i % 7 == 0 ? str + "BAR" : "BAR";

return str;

share|improve this answer
pseudcode:
if (num/3)
{
    print foo
}
elseif (num/7)
{
    print bar
}
else
{
        print num
}

basically foobar will get concatenated when a number divisible by 21 is encountered.

share|improve this answer
1  
Doesn't print foobar if the number is divisible by 21. –  M42 Mar 1 '12 at 12:30

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