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I need to create a function pointer file. I am using perl for the same. My input is a list of function declarations. Below are some examples:

1.

char * cc_Hightor_ind(Closed* p_Closed);
  to 
char * (*cc_Hightor_ind)(Closed* p_Closed);

2.

char cc_Hightor_ind(Closed* p_Closed);
   to 
char (*cc_Hightor_ind)(Closed* p_Closed);

These are 2 usual cases where the function returns a pointer and value. I am unable to resolve on how to convert the function name to be preceded by (*.

My logic is on finding '_ind', I back-track to the start of the word and add (* . I am finding it hard to translate this to code. Please suggest the same. Currently I am using the regex to each datatype and adding adding (* to it which is a very lengthy process.

Thanks in advance

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Update according to updated question:

while(<DATA>) {
    chomp;
    s/(\*?\s+)(\w+\s*\()/$1(*$2)/;
    say;
}
__DATA__
char * cc_Hightor_ind(Closed* p_Closed);
char cc_Hightor_ind(Closed* p_Closed);

output:

char * (*cc_Hightor_ind)(Closed* p_Closed);
char (*cc_Hightor_ind)(Closed* p_Closed);
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Thanks! But I am not sure if this will work if my $str = 'char cc_Hightor_ind(Closed* p_Closed);'; –  Aad Mar 1 '12 at 13:40
1  
@Aad: Sure, it'll not work. But what do you want in this case? Please add some more test cases (by editing your question) that covered your needs. –  M42 Mar 1 '12 at 13:49
    
@Aad: See my updated answer. –  M42 Mar 2 '12 at 9:16
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Akin to processing XML with regular expressions, this will never be 100% correct unless you involve a proper C parser. But you can write something that will be correct for most common situations, and perhaps always correct for a given sample of C code - especially if that code is auto-generated.

Try this for an initial attempt, which includes both code samples that you have posted. If you want us to help you more then please post a comprehensive example of what you are processing

use strict;
use warnings;

while (<DATA>) {
  chomp;
  (my $ptr = $_) =~ s/( \w+ \s* )\(/(*$1)(/x ;
  print $ptr, "\n";
}

__DATA__
char * cc_Hightor_ind(Closed* p_Closed);
char cc_Hightor_ind(Closed* p_Closed);

OUTPUT

char * (*cc_Hightor_ind)(Closed* p_Closed);
char (*cc_Hightor_ind)(Closed* p_Closed);
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Sorry, I don't have time for a full answer, but here is some discussion about parsing C in Perl. http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=746341 Perhaps it can give you some ideas.

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I have arrived at the following round-about solution :-(

my $line  = "char * cc_Hightor_ind(Closed* p_Closed);";
# split with white-space as delimiter
my @splt = split (/\s/, $line);
$count = split(/\s/, $line);
#traverse through tokens
for ($i = 0; $i < $count; $i++) {
  # If token has '_ind', then prepend '(*' and append ')' to it
  if ((@splt[$i] =~ s/_ind/_ind\)/)) {

    @splt[$i] = "\(* @splt[$i]\) ";

  }
}

    $line = join (" ", @splt);
    print "$line\n";

 #sample output
 #D:\gsa\mytries\prl>getFptr.pl
 #char * (* cc_Hightor_ind(Closed* p_Closed);
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