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I am writing an application to check the status of some internal web applications. Some of these applications use Windows authentication. When I use this code to check the status, it throws The remote server returned an error: (401) Unauthorized.. Which is understandable because I haven't provided any credentials to the webiste so I am not authorized.

WebResponse objResponse = null;
WebRequest objRequest = HttpWebRequest.Create(website);
objResponse = objRequest.GetResponse();


Is there a way to ignore the 401 error without doing something like this?

WebRequest objRequest = HttpWebRequest.Create(website);

try
{
    objResponse = objRequest.GetResponse();
}
catch (WebException ex)
{
    //Catch and ignore 401 Unauthorized errors because this means the site is up, the app just doesn't have authorization to use it.
    if (!ex.Message.Contains("The remote server returned an error: (401) Unauthorized."))
    {
        throw;
    }                    
}
share|improve this question
    
What do you mean with 'ignore' here, move on to the next page? –  Henk Holterman Mar 1 '12 at 13:55
1  
It probably won't help with the exception at all, but you should be doing a HEAD request as it is lighter and handles this situation well. –  M.Babcock Mar 1 '12 at 13:55
    
@HenkHolterman Either a property that makes the webrequest not throw an exception or to just swallow the exception like I have above. –  guanome Mar 1 '12 at 13:58
    
@M.Babcock Do you have a link to an example or how to use that? –  guanome Mar 1 '12 at 13:59
    
@guanome - First hit from google, though the only line that matters is request.Method = "HEAD"; –  M.Babcock Mar 1 '12 at 14:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When the server is down or unreachable you will get a timeout exception. I know that the only way to handle that is with a try/catch.

I'm quite sure this is the case for most errors (401/404/501), so: No, you can't ignore (prevent) the exceptions but you will have to handle them. They are the only way to get most of the StatusCodes your App is looking for.

share|improve this answer

I would suggest to try this:

        try
        {
            objResponse = objRequest.GetResponse() as HttpWebResponse;
        }
        catch (WebException ex)
        {
            objResponse = ex.Response as HttpWebResponse;
        }
        finally

The WebException has the response all information you want.

share|improve this answer

The short of it is you'll want to check the myHttpWebResponse.StatusCode for the status code and act accordingly.

Sample code from reference:

public static void GetPage(String url) 
    {
        try 
          { 
                // Creates an HttpWebRequest for the specified URL. 
                HttpWebRequest myHttpWebRequest = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(url); 
                // Sends the HttpWebRequest and waits for a response.
                HttpWebResponse myHttpWebResponse = (HttpWebResponse)myHttpWebRequest.GetResponse(); 
                if (myHttpWebResponse.StatusCode == HttpStatusCode.OK)
                   Console.WriteLine("\r\nResponse Status Code is OK and StatusDescription is: {0}",
                                        myHttpWebResponse.StatusDescription);
                // Releases the resources of the response.
                myHttpWebResponse.Close(); 

            } 
        catch(WebException e) 
           {
                Console.WriteLine("\r\nWebException Raised. The following error occured : {0}",e.Status); 
           }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("\nThe following Exception was raised : {0}",e.Message);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
The exception is thrown at objResponse = objRequest.GetResponse();, so I can't check the response because the response never gets set. If you mean in the exception, it will give me a ProtocolError, so I'll still have to sift through the exception message to see what the status code actually was. –  guanome Mar 1 '12 at 14:16

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