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I'm working on an automatic summarization system in my C++ class and have a question regarding one of the ASCII comparisons I'm doing. Here's the code:

    char ch;
    string sentence;
    pair<char, char> sentenceCheck;
    int counter = 0;
    while (!ifs2.eof())
    {
        ch = ifs2.get();
        ch = tolower(ch);

        if (ch == 13)
            ch = ifs2.get();

        if (ch != 10 && ch != '?' && ch != '!' && ch != '.')
            sentence += ch;

        sentenceCheck.first = sentenceCheck.second;
        sentenceCheck.second = ch;

        cout << sentenceCheck.first << "-" << (int)sentenceCheck.first << " ---- " << sentenceCheck.second << "-" << (int)sentenceCheck.second << endl;

        if(sentenceCheck.second == ' ' || sentenceCheck.second == 10 || sentenceCheck.second == -1)
        {
            if(sentenceCheck.first == '?' || sentenceCheck.first == '!' || sentenceCheck.first == '.')
            {
                istringstream s(sentence);
                while(s >> wordInSentence)
                {
                    sentenceWordMap.insert(pair<string, int>(wordInSentence, 0));
                }
                //sentenceList.push_back(pair<string, int>(sentence, 0));
                sentence.clear();
            }
        }
    }

What is being done here (with the two if statements) is checking whether a new sentence has begun in the text that is to be analyzed and dealt with later. The conditionals work but only because we discovered that we have to check for that -1 as well. Any ideas what that represents?

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ASCII non-extended is only 7 bits asciitable.com –  kenny Mar 1 '12 at 13:56
3  
You should use if(!ifs2), which checks for fail modes and EOF. –  Cory Nelson Mar 1 '12 at 13:58
    
Also, for the future, most calculators have a programmers mode (at least Windows, Mac, GNOME and KDE). I think that they all have some sort of Show in ASCII button. –  Linuxios Mar 1 '12 at 14:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As an ASCII character -1 doesn't represent anything (which is to say -1 is not a valid ASCII value). As the return value from get() it means that the read operation failed - most likely due to the end of file being reached.

Note that the eof() function doesn't return true if the next call to get will fail because of the end of file being reached - it returns true if the previous call to get failed because of the end of file being reached.

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-1 doesn't represent anything in ASCII. All ASCII codes are in the range [0, 127]. It's not even guaranteed by C++ that -1 is a valid value for a char.

The problem is that you're not checking the return value from ifs2.get(), which returns an int (not a char!) that may be -1 on end of file. The proper way to check for this is

int ch = ifs2.get();
if (!ifs2)
    // break the loop

because the EOF value is not guaranteed to be -1 (it's actually std::char_traits<char>::eof()).

(Btw., you shouldn't write ASCII codes as magic numbers; use \n for linefeed, \r for carriage return.)

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A common shorthand for this is while(ifs2 >> ch) { /* process char */ } –  Cory Nelson Mar 1 '12 at 15:05

It's not ASCII, it's an error returned by istream::get

ch = ifs2.get();

It's probably EOF, i.e. you've run out of input.

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1  
+1, indeed. And the OP should be collect the return value in an int, not a `char. –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 1 '12 at 14:00

The while is incorrectly structured: you need to check eof() immediately after get():

for (;;)
{
    ch = ifs2.get();
    if (ifs2.eof()) break;
    ch = tolower(ch);

    if (ch == 13)
    {
        ch = ifs2.get();
        if (ifs2.eof()) break;
    }

    ...
}

The -1 is probably the EOF indicator.

Note (as has already been stated) get() returns an int, not a char.

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The fact that checking for -1 works is an accident, and has nothing to do with ASCII values (which only use 0 to 127). Your code will fail if either plain char is unsigned (compile with /J with VC++, I think), or EOF isn't -1 (rare, but all that's guaranteed is that it is negative). You're code will also fail if the input happens to be Latin-1, and it contains a 'ÿ'.

The basic problem in your code is that you're not checking for end of file correctly. Putting the test at the top of the loop doesn't work; you need to test for failure (not eof()) after input, before using the value read. There are several ways of doing this; in your case, the simplest is probably to use:

if ( !ifs2.get(ch) ) {
    //  Input failed...
}

Alternatively, you can make ch an int, and do:

ch = ifs2.get();
if ( ch == EOF ) {
    //  Input failed...
}

This has the advantage that the following call to tolower is no longer undefined behavior (tolower takes an int, which must be in the range [0...UCHAR_MAX] or EOF—if plain char is signed, you aren't guaranteeing this). On the other hand, it doesn't allow chaining, i.e. you can't write the equivalent of:

while ( ifs2.get( sentenceCheck.first )
        && ifs2.get( sentenceCheck.second ) ) {
    //  ...
}

(which could be useful in some cases).

FWIW: the technique you're using is something called a sliding window into a stream, and it's worth pushing it off into a separate class to handle the logic of keeping the window filled and up to date. Alternatively, a simple state machine could be used for your problem.

And I'd definitely avoid using magic constants: if you want to check for a carriage return, compare with '\r'. Similarly, newline is '\n', and in the outer if, it looks like you want to check for whitespace (isspace( static_cast<unsigned char>( sentenceCheck.second ) )), rather than comparing for the values.

I might also add that your code fails to correctly handle sentences that end with a quote, like This is the "text in your input."; it also fails for abbreviations like Mr. Jones is here.. But those problems may be beyond the scope of your assignment. (The abbreviations one is probably not fully solvable: sometimes "etc." is the end of a sentence, and sometimes it's not.)

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