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I am trying to write a multithreaded program where each thread would use a counter and then increment it.

for example:

lock(this)
{
   counter++;
   Console.WriteLine(counter); 
}

i know that for incrementation i can use:

System.Threading.Interlocked.Increment(counter);

but what about locking for both incrementing and doing something with the counter?

Thanks!

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1  
What specific problem are you having? –  M.Babcock Mar 1 '12 at 14:29
    
If you use lock, you don't need Interlock.Increment. What's your question exactly? –  dtb Mar 1 '12 at 14:30
1  
i am referring to this article: c-sharpcorner.com/UploadFile/mahesh/… –  kiki Mar 1 '12 at 14:31
    
As long as 'doing something with the counter' is using it read-only there is no issue here. –  Henk Holterman Mar 1 '12 at 14:33
1  
@HenkHolterman it depends, if 'read-only' means read-only across all threads then you are correct, however if the counter is a long running on a 32 bit machine you can not safely read it if other threads could update the value. That is the reason for Interlocked.Read –  Scott Chamberlain Mar 1 '12 at 14:46

4 Answers 4

Doing this is OK:

Thread A:

var incremented_counter = Interlocked.Increment(ref counter);
Console.WriteLine(incremented_counter);

Thread B:

Interlocked.Increment(ref counter);

And doing this is OK:

Thread A:

lock (the_lock) {
   ++counter;
   Console.WriteLine(counter); 
}

Thread B:

lock (the_lock) {
   ++counter;
}

Doing this is OK but redundant:

Thread A:

lock (the_lock) {
    var incremented_counter = Interlocked.Increment(ref counter);
    Console.WriteLine(incremented_counter);
}

Thread B:

lock (the_lock) {
    Interlocked.Increment(ref counter);
}

But doing this is not OK:

Thread A:

Interlocked.Increment(ref counter);
Console.WriteLine(counter);

Thread B:

Interlocked.Increment(ref counter);

Nor is it doing this:

Thread A:

lock (the_lock) {
   ++counter;
   Console.WriteLine(counter); 
}

Thread B:

Interlocked.Increment(ref counter);

Nor is it doing this:

Thread A:

var incremented_counter = Interlocked.Increment(ref counter);
Console.WriteLine(incremented_counter);

Thread B:

lock (the_lock) {
   ++counter;
}

(BTW, don't use lock on this.)

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1  
-1 Interlocked.Increment takes one reference parameter, and it reads, increments and stores it in a single atomic operation. var incremented_counter = Interlock.Increment(ref counter); is the correct version. –  Aidiakapi Mar 21 '12 at 10:22
    
@Aidiakapi How does that make any of what I wrote incorrect? BTW, I did make a typo: it should be Interlocked (not Interlock). –  Branko Dimitrijevic Mar 21 '12 at 10:30
    
Non of your examples will compile. –  Aidiakapi Mar 21 '12 at 11:03
    
@Aidiakapi Ahh... I forgot ref (edited). But others have made the same mistake and I don't see you downvoting them! In any case, this is just a syntax error and not really relevant for the greater point I was trying to make - wouldn't you agree that I've correctly illustrated both the proper and the improper use of various synchronization techniques? –  Branko Dimitrijevic Mar 21 '12 at 11:23
1  
Yes, but the other reason I downvoted was because you only give example, say what to do and what not to do, without telling them why it is right or wrong. Don't get me wrong, your examples are more than correct. But things like: var incremented_counter = Interlocked.Increment(ref counter); might imply to somebody who has no idea what it does that counter isn't incremented and just incremented_counter has been incremented. But I'll upvote you :P –  Aidiakapi Mar 21 '12 at 13:08

All of the Interlock functions return a copy of the value after modification, used that returned value during your thread.

var localCounter = System.Threading.Interlock.Increment(counter);
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2  
Interlocked.Exchange and Interlocked.CompareExchange return the value before modification (they'd be sorta useless if they returned the 'after' value). –  supercat Mar 1 '12 at 14:34
    
You are correct. I guess the lesson is always check the MSDN –  Scott Chamberlain Mar 1 '12 at 14:39
    
Incidentally, I've sometimes wished for Interlocked.PostIncrement or Interlocked.PostDecrement operations, especially in vb which does not a convenient "unchecked integer add/subtract" operation. Fundamentally, they'd be the same operation as the normal Interlocked.Increment/Decrement (with an unchecked subtract/add following), but if one wants the value the variable had before the adjustment, specifying that in the call would seem more logical than doing the adjustment and then unadjusting the result. –  supercat Mar 1 '12 at 15:54

You will need to protect both the reading and the writing using the lock. In that case, the lock statement works best, and is easiest to follow:

private int counter;
private readonly object locker = new object();

public void IncrementCounter()
{
    lock (this.locker)
    {
       this.counter++;
       Console.WriteLine(counter); 
    }
}

public int GetCounter()
{
    lock (this.locker)
    {
       return this.counter;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The Interlocked.Increment function both increments the counter and returns its value; the two operations are guaranteed to be atomic. Other interlocked functions exist for decrementing/reading a counter, or adding to/reading a variable. In general, one can perform almost any simple operation on an Int32 or Int64 via the pattern:

  Int64 oldValue, newValue;
  do
  {
    oldValue = theVariable;
    newValue = oldValue | 1;  // Sample operation
  } while (Interlocked.CompareExchange(theVariable, newValue, oldValue) != oldValue);

One has to be careful to get the pattern right (e.g. be certain that newValue is computed in terms of oldValue and not theVariable) but the pattern is pretty simple and versatile.

share|improve this answer
    
The returning of value is not guaranteed to be atomic, only the update of the passed in variable. If another thread was reading the value of the variable that had its value set from the return of the function while it was being assigned you would get tearing. The returned value is a non thread safe local copy. –  Scott Chamberlain Mar 1 '12 at 14:42
    
@ScottChamberlain: I'm 99.99999% certain that Foo = Interlocked.Increment(Bar) will perform an atomic sequence [temp = Bar, temp+=1, Bar=temp], followed non-atomically by the operation [Foo = temp]. The generation of the return value is guaranteed to be atomic with the increment, but there's no way the Interlocked function should be reasonably expected to guarantee anything about the atomicity of anything that happens after it returns. –  supercat Mar 1 '12 at 15:50
    
Yes but your answer says "both increments the counter and returns its value; the two operations are guaranteed to be atomic." to me, you where implying the assignment of Foo in Foo = Interlocked.Increment(Bar) would be atomic. –  Scott Chamberlain Mar 1 '12 at 19:38
1  
@ScottChamberlain: Sorry for any confusion. The original poster was suggesting a sequence which would be essentially "Atomic-increment variable; read variable; store it somewhere". The first two steps of that sequence can themselves be done atomically, even though the third step cannot. –  supercat Mar 1 '12 at 20:44

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