Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've just started working with Dapper and I don't seem to find something very simple like mapping an entity to a table in my database:

I have a stored procedure:

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].GetUserById (@UserId int)
AS  
begin               
        SELECT UserId,LastName,FirstName,EmailAddress
        FROM users
        WHERE UserID = @UserId

end
go

Then an entity:

public class User
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
}

And a dapper query in my code:

int userid=1;
    User User = connection.Query<User>("#GetUserById", new {userid=userid}, commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure).FirstOrDefault();

My question is: How can I tell my entity User that Id is Userid on my database?

In EF I would do something like this:

MapSingleType(c => new
            {
                UserId = c.Id,
                Firstname = c.Firstname,
                Lastname = c.Lastname,
                EmailAddress = c.Email
            }).ToTable("users");

How can the above be achieved in dapper?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Dapper deliberately doesn't have a mapping layer; it is the absolute minimum that can work, and frankly covers the majority of real scenarios in the process. However, if I understand correctly that you don't want to alias in the TSQL, and don't want any pass-thru properties - then use the non-generic Query API:

User user = connection.Query("...", ...).Select(obj => new User {
           Id = (int) obj.UserId,
           FirstName = (string) obj.FirstName,
           LastName = (string) obj.LastName,
           Email = (string) obj.EmailAddress
        }).FirstOrDefault();

or perhaps more simply in the case of a single record:

var obj = connection.Query("...", ...).FirstOrDefault();
User user = new User {
      Id = (int) obj.UserId,
      FirstName = (string) obj.FirstName,
      LastName = (string) obj.LastName,
      Email = (string) obj.EmailAddress
};

The trick here is that the non-generic Query(...) API uses dynamic, offering up members per column name.

share|improve this answer
    
Does affect performance doing it this way? –  David Aleu Mar 1 '12 at 14:55
2  
@david not in a material way, maybe 2% slower –  Sam Saffron Mar 2 '12 at 10:17

It can't, your user class must be defined to match the result coming back from the query.

Once you've got the result back you must map it manually to another class (or use AutoMapper)

share|improve this answer

You could try something like this:

public class User
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }

    #region Remappings

    public int UserId
    {
        get { return Id; }
        set { Id = value; }
    }

    #endregion
}

It might be overkill for your example, but I've found it useful in some situations to avoid cluttering every Query<> call with the remapping code.

share|improve this answer
    
Would prefer to handle this mapping in the the Query<> code than to clutter my objects and tie them to the data layer –  Karl Glennon Oct 21 '12 at 21:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.