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I am currently checking if I have retrieved the data I saved in "data.txt" so that's the only code I have for accept function. Every time I'm in the end of file the program crashes. I can retrieve all the data properly only the crash is my problem.

here's my code:

#include<iostream>
#include<conio.h>    
#include<windows.h>
#include<fstream>

using namespace std;

void clrscr()
{
    system("cls");
}

struct node
{
    string data;
    struct node *yes;
    struct node *no;
};


node *pnode,*root;
int level=0;
struct node *add();
void accept();

int main()
{
    char ch,ch2;

    pnode=(node*)malloc(sizeof(node));
    pnode->yes=NULL;
    pnode->no=NULL;
    pnode->data="Do you love me?: ";

    root=(node*)malloc(sizeof(node));
    root=pnode;
    root->yes=NULL;
    root->no=NULL;
    root=pnode;
    accept();

    while(1)
    {
        clrscr();
        ch2='y';
        cout<<root->data;
        ch=getche();
        if(ch=='y')
        {
            root=root->yes;
            if(root==NULL)
            {
                cout<<"\nI got you !! ";
                root=pnode;

                cout<<"\n\nAnother Round?? [y/n]";
                ch2=getche();
                if(ch2=='n')
                break;
            }
        }

        else
        if(ch=='n')
        {

            if(root->no==NULL)
            {
                root->no=add();
                root=pnode;
                cout<<"\n\nAnother Round?? [y/n]";
                ch2=getche();
                if(ch2=='n')
                break;
            }
            else
             root=root->no;


        }

    }


}

struct node *add()
{
   clrscr();
   string str1,str2;
   node *nNode,*nNode2;
   cout<<"What's on your mind? : ";
   getline(cin,str1);
   cout<<"What question suits that thing? : ";
   getline(cin,str2);

   nNode=(node*)malloc(sizeof(node));
   nNode2=(node*)malloc(sizeof(node));

   nNode->data=str2;
   nNode2->data="Is it "+str1+"? ";

   nNode2->yes=NULL;
   nNode2->no=NULL;
   nNode->yes=nNode2;
   nNode->no=NULL;


    fstream File("data.txt", ios::out | ios::app);
    File<<nNode->data<<endl;
    File<<nNode2->data<<endl;

    File.close();

    fstream File1("level.txt", ios::out | ios::app);
    File1<<level<<endl;
    File1<<level+1<<endl;
    File1.close();

    fstream File2("branch.txt", ios::out | ios::app);
    File2<<level<<endl;
    File2<<level+1<<endl;
    File2.close();

    level++;

   return nNode;
}


void accept()
{
    string dat[256],dat1;
    int i=0,lvl[256],brnch[256],lvl1,brnch1;
    root=root->no;
    fstream file;
    file.open("data.txt", ios::in | ios::binary);
    while(file.good())
    {

       getline(file,dat1);
       cout<<dat1<<endl;
       getch();

    }
    file.close();

}
share|improve this question
2  
What is the crash? An exception? Post the exception. Need more info. I notice you are calling malloc but not freeing memory. – Stealth Rabbi Mar 1 '12 at 14:43
    
Also, allocating root and promptly overwriting it – vmpstr Mar 1 '12 at 14:46
1  
NO NEED FOR ALL CAPS IN YOUR TITLE, ALSO, POST THE ERROR MESSAGE YOU GET – Gordon Bailey Mar 1 '12 at 14:46
    
Why are you using malloc for a constant size allocation? You should declare that as just node whatever={"blah blah", NULL, NULL} – Linuxios Mar 1 '12 at 14:48
    
Thank you but now I found the root of my problem. Thanks for all of your comments – user1242812 Mar 1 '12 at 15:18

You dont check if the allocations succeed in your code, for example in:

pnode=(node*)malloc(sizeof(node));

Here you allocate space for root but then that space is wasted, because you make root point elsewhere:

root=(node*)malloc(sizeof(node));
root=pnode;

Then you re-assign root to pnode:

root=(node*)malloc(sizeof(node));
root=pnode;
root->yes=NULL;
root->no=NULL;
root=pnode;

And these are only the first lines. The code is wrong in many points, you should have a look at how pointers work.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I understand now when to allocate memory. I only wanted to assure that the node I created to be accessed and to prevent my program to crash due to nodes that are not null. But does this problem affects the reading of file in accept function? – user1242812 Mar 1 '12 at 14:54
    
This will not work because node is not POD. You would need: void * mem = malloc(sizeof(node) ); root = new(mem)node; (placement new).However here it is almost certainly wrong to be using placement new. – CashCow Mar 1 '12 at 15:33

Use new to allocate a node, not malloc. malloc will not call ctors, causing e.g. the strings to be uninitialized, which in turn causes quite some undefined behaviour when you try to assign to it.

share|improve this answer
    
The basics of the answer as I see it are exactly that: node isn't a POD and therefore can't use malloc unless a placement new follows. – CashCow Mar 1 '12 at 21:11

Whilst you can use malloc in C++ code too, this should be only reserved to writing allocators or overloading operator new, when all you want to do is allocate memory.

In this case the big issue is that node has a std::string in it, so it can not be written with C code as such. It needs construction. You can use malloc here to allocate its memory and then use placement-new but unless you are doing this to pre-allocate the memory for large numbers of nodes, it is not really advisable. If you are going to do that for performance, there's an alternative anyway, to use vector with reserve.

I guess for now, do not use malloc, and preferably also use some kind of C++ collection to manage your nodes, as you must manage the lifetime of those you allocate.

share|improve this answer

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