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I have a need that is a bit similar to this question, except that it requires a deeper exploration of the source object.

Here is a code sample:

public class Target {};

public class Analyzed
{
    public Target EasyOne { get; set; }
    public IList<Target> ABitMoreTricky { get; set; }
    public IList<Tuple<string, Target>> Nightmare { get; set; }
}

From an instance of Analyzed, I want to extract all the Target instances.

In order to ease the exploration, we can assume the following:

  1. Explore only properties.
  2. There is no infinite reference loop.

For now, EasyOne is... easy, but I am looking for some strategy to get all the Target instances lost in more tricky structures.

share|improve this question
    
Generic parameters themselves do not have instances. –  M.Babcock Mar 1 '12 at 15:09
2  
To @M.Babcock's point- I assume you meant the instance of Target stored in each of the Tuples stored in the IList Nightmare? –  Chris Shain Mar 1 '12 at 15:10
    
I don't understand, whats the question with your example. –  BlueM Mar 1 '12 at 15:12
2  
Make the class serializable, serialize it into a xml, extract the Target nodes, deserialize them. It's a joke :P –  Adrian Iftode Mar 1 '12 at 15:20
1  
@Adrian Iftode, I liked a lot your solution too :D –  remio Mar 1 '12 at 16:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

How about something along these lines:

    public List<T> FindAllInstances<T>(object value) where T : class
    {

        HashSet<object> exploredObjects = new HashSet<object>();
        List<T> found = new List<T>();

        FindAllInstances(value, exploredObjects, found);

        return found;
    }

    private void FindAllInstances<T>(object value, HashSet<object> exploredObjects, List<T> found) where T : class
    {
        if (value == null)
            return;

        if (exploredObjects.Contains(value))
            return;

        exploredObjects.Add(value);

        IEnumerable enumerable = value as IEnumerable;

        if (enumerable != null)
        {
            foreach(object item in enumerable)
            {
                FindAllInstances<T>(item, exploredObjects, found);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            T possibleMatch = value as T;

            if (possibleMatch != null)
            {
                found.Add(possibleMatch);
            }

            Type type = value.GetType();

            PropertyInfo[] properties = type.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.GetProperty);

            foreach(PropertyInfo property in properties)
            {
                object propertyValue = property.GetValue(value, null);

                FindAllInstances<T>(propertyValue, exploredObjects, found);
            }

        }

    private void TestIt()
    {
        Analyzed analyzed = new Analyzed()
        {
            EasyOne = new Target(),
            ABitMoreTricky = new List<Target>() { new Target() },
            Nightmare = new List<Tuple<string, Target>>() { new Tuple<string, Target>("", new Target()) }
        };

        List<Target> found = FindAllInstances<Target>(analyzed);

        MessageBox.Show(found.Count.ToString());
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, RQDQ, this answers perfectly my question. I was not expecting so much... You even managed the infinite reference loop. –  remio Mar 1 '12 at 16:17
1  
The line object propertyValue = property.GetValue(value, null); fails if you have an indexed property (this[int index]), easy to check, but then you're skipping stuff. I rewrote it to use FieldInfo which is just as easy as properties. –  Jaap Apr 29 '13 at 11:41

You could go the reflection way, and have special treatment for all the containers you know (IEnumerable, IDictionary, all Tuples, and who knows what else), or you can actually implement what @Adrian Iftode jokingly said in a comment.

I don't think you really want to serialize to XML and then parse it. It will work, but it will require all your objects to be XML serializable, which, if I am not mistaken, requires all serialized data to be public.

You should use the ordinary serialization, but define your own custom formatter that does nothing but track the objects you're looking for. Here's an example of a simple custom formatter.

share|improve this answer

You can do this using reflection. There are two tasks to solve:

  1. Get all properties of a type. Type.GetProperties() will do that.

  2. Determine if a property type is of type Target or is generic type with Target as a type argument. You can use Type.IsGenericType to test if a type is generic and Type.GetGenericArguments to get the actual type arguments. If a match is found you should recurse this generic type starting at 1 and perform the match described in 2.

So by using reflection and recursion on generic types should be able to do what you want.

share|improve this answer

Dim tTargets() = {New List(Of Target) From {New Target("Joe"), New Target("Bob")}, New Target("Veronica"), New Tuple(Of String, Target, DateTime, Target)("A Tuple", New Target("Henry"), DateTime.Now, New Target("Deacon"))}

Sub ShowMeTheTargets(ByVal tRoot As Object, ByVal tLevel As Int32)

        Dim tCount As Int64 = 0
        Dim tCountName As String = "Length"

        If Nothing Is tRoot Then
            Exit Sub
        End If

        If tRoot.GetType Is GetType(Target) Then
            RTB.AppendText("Found: " & CType(tRoot, Target).Name & vbCrLf)
            '
            '   Assume Target is not a Target container.
            '
            Exit Sub
        End If

        If LEVEL_MAX = tLevel Then
            '
            '   We don't want to scan this object graph any deeper
            '
            Exit Sub
        End If

        If (Nothing Is tRoot.GetType.GetInterface("IEnumerable")) Then
            For Each tProperty As PropertyInfo In tRoot.GetType.GetProperties
                ShowMeTheTargets(tProperty.GetValue(tRoot, Nothing), tLevel + 1)
            Next
        Else
            For Each tObject As Object In tRoot
                ShowMeTheTargets(tObject, tLevel + 1)
            Next
            RTB.AppendText(tCount & vbCrLf)
        End If
    End Sub
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, Boo. It looks like RQDQ's (even if I am not really used to read VB). –  remio Mar 1 '12 at 16:21
    
Yeah, RQDQ beat me to it.. but since I did the work I posted it anyhow. –  Dan-o Mar 1 '12 at 16:25

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