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The problem is that I need to know if it's version 3.5 SP 1. Environment.Version() only returns 2.0.50727.3053.

I found this solution, but I think it will take much more time than it's worth, so I'm looking for a simpler one. Is it possible?

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I used the approach mentioned in stackoverflow.com/questions/15128426/… –  Lijo Mar 1 '13 at 12:12
    
How to: Determine Which .NET Framework Versions Are Installed (includes also programmatic solution) –  informatik01 Sep 3 '13 at 16:01
    
Update 2015: The accepted answer can't distinguish between 4.0, 4.5, 4.5.1, 4.5.2 and 4.6. Let's update the answers. –  Colonel Panic Jul 28 at 8:29
    
@ColonelPanic I added an answer to address your bounty below. –  Semicolons and Duct Tape Jul 28 at 12:49
    
I've updated the accepted answer with a solution for .net 4+ –  Factor Mystic Jul 28 at 14:42

10 Answers 10

up vote 38 down vote accepted
+50

Something like this should do it. Just grab the value from the registry

For .NET 1-4:

Framework is the highest installed version, SP is the service pack for that version.

RegistryKey installed_versions = Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey(@"SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\NDP");
string[] version_names = installed_versions.GetSubKeyNames();
//version names start with 'v', eg, 'v3.5' which needs to be trimmed off before conversion
double Framework = Convert.ToDouble(version_names[version_names.Length - 1].Remove(0, 1), CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
int SP = Convert.ToInt32(installed_versions.OpenSubKey(version_names[version_names.Length - 1]).GetValue("SP", 0));

For .NET 4.5+ (from official documentation):

using System;
using Microsoft.Win32;


...


private static void Get45or451FromRegistry()
{
    using (RegistryKey ndpKey = RegistryKey.OpenBaseKey(RegistryHive.LocalMachine, RegistryView.Registry32).OpenSubKey("SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\NET Framework Setup\\NDP\\v4\\Full\\")) {
        int releaseKey = Convert.ToInt32(ndpKey.GetValue("Release"));
        if (true) {
            Console.WriteLine("Version: " + CheckFor45DotVersion(releaseKey));
        }
    }
}


...


// Checking the version using >= will enable forward compatibility,  
// however you should always compile your code on newer versions of 
// the framework to ensure your app works the same. 
private static string CheckFor45DotVersion(int releaseKey)
{
    if (releaseKey >= 393273) {
       return "4.6 RC or later";
    }
    if ((releaseKey >= 379893)) {
        return "4.5.2 or later";
    }
    if ((releaseKey >= 378675)) {
        return "4.5.1 or later";
    }
    if ((releaseKey >= 378389)) {
        return "4.5 or later";
    }
    // This line should never execute. A non-null release key should mean 
    // that 4.5 or later is installed. 
    return "No 4.5 or later version detected";
}
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Thanks! This works, but I still need the service pack. Any idea? –  Carlo Jun 4 '09 at 17:24
    
The long version string as well as SP subkey for each SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\NDP\<.net version> should provide this, which you can grab with the GetValue method. –  Factor Mystic Jun 4 '09 at 17:30
    
at the v3.5 level there is a key called SP. The value is the service pack level –  Christopher Klein Jun 4 '09 at 17:36
4  
Wouldn't this just get the highest INSTALLED version of .NET on the machine - not the version that the app is running under? –  Grinn Aug 8 '12 at 13:50
2  
@FactorMystic : Hi, I have used your code to check latest version, but it not lists version 4.5 even it is installed in my PC. Please guide me –  Upendra Chaudhari Jan 3 '14 at 6:57

Environment.Version() is giving the correct answer for a different question. The same version of the CLR is used in .NET 2.0, 3, and 3.5. I suppose you could check the GAC for libraries that were added in each of those subsequent releases.

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2  
Environment.Version() is giving 2.0 even if it is running with 3.5 –  Lijo Feb 28 '13 at 5:41
2  
Environment.Version() is giving you the name of the CLR. 3.5 isn't a new version of the CLR. It's 2.0 plus some extra libraries with a marketing-driven 1.5 increment. –  quillbreaker Jul 9 '13 at 22:47
2  
The answer is misleading. CLR 2.0 is used for .NET 2.0, 3.0 and 3.5. The CLR has changed with version 4. CLR 4.0 is used for .NET 4.0. –  bouvierr Mar 6 '14 at 17:57
    
Bouvierr is correct. –  quillbreaker Apr 29 '14 at 15:09

Not sure why nobody suggested following the official advice from Microsoft right here.

This is the code they recommend. Sure it's ugly, but it works.

private static void GetVersionFromRegistry()
{
     // Opens the registry key for the .NET Framework entry. 
        using (RegistryKey ndpKey = 
            RegistryKey.OpenRemoteBaseKey(RegistryHive.LocalMachine, "").
            OpenSubKey(@"SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\NDP\"))
        {
            // As an alternative, if you know the computers you will query are running .NET Framework 4.5  
            // or later, you can use: 
            // using (RegistryKey ndpKey = RegistryKey.OpenBaseKey(RegistryHive.LocalMachine,  
            // RegistryView.Registry32).OpenSubKey(@"SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\NDP\"))
        foreach (string versionKeyName in ndpKey.GetSubKeyNames())
        {
            if (versionKeyName.StartsWith("v"))
            {

                RegistryKey versionKey = ndpKey.OpenSubKey(versionKeyName);
                string name = (string)versionKey.GetValue("Version", "");
                string sp = versionKey.GetValue("SP", "").ToString();
                string install = versionKey.GetValue("Install", "").ToString();
                if (install == "") //no install info, must be later.
                    Console.WriteLine(versionKeyName + "  " + name);
                else
                {
                    if (sp != "" && install == "1")
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(versionKeyName + "  " + name + "  SP" + sp);
                    }

                }
                if (name != "")
                {
                    continue;
                }
                foreach (string subKeyName in versionKey.GetSubKeyNames())
                {
                    RegistryKey subKey = versionKey.OpenSubKey(subKeyName);
                    name = (string)subKey.GetValue("Version", "");
                    if (name != "")
                        sp = subKey.GetValue("SP", "").ToString();
                    install = subKey.GetValue("Install", "").ToString();
                    if (install == "") //no install info, must be later.
                        Console.WriteLine(versionKeyName + "  " + name);
                    else
                    {
                        if (sp != "" && install == "1")
                        {
                            Console.WriteLine("  " + subKeyName + "  " + name + "  SP" + sp);
                        }
                        else if (install == "1")
                        {
                            Console.WriteLine("  " + subKeyName + "  " + name);
                        }

                    }

                }

            }
        }
    }

}
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AFAIK there's no built in method in the framework that will allow you to do this. You could check this post for a suggestion on determining framework version by reading windows registry values.

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Without further investigation, Environment.Version() probably just returns the version of the CLR.

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1  
Environment.Version() is giving 2.0 even if it is running with 3.5 –  Lijo Feb 28 '13 at 5:42
3  
@Lijo, for .NET 3.5, the CLR version is in fact 2.0. –  Mathias Lykkegaard Lorenzen Oct 19 '14 at 21:26

Thank you for this post which was quite useful. I had to tweak it a little in order to check for framework 2.0 because the registry key cannot be converted straightaway to a double. Here is the code:

string[] version_names = rk.GetSubKeyNames();
//version names start with 'v', eg, 'v3.5'
//we also need to take care of strings like v2.0.50727...
string sCurrent = version_names[version_names.Length - 1].Remove(0, 1);
if (sCurrent.LastIndexOf(".") > 1)
{
    string[] sSplit = sCurrent.Split('.');
    sCurrent = sSplit[0] + "." + sSplit[1] + sSplit[2];
}
double dCurrent = Convert.ToDouble(sCurrent, System.Globalization.CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
double dExpected = Convert.ToDouble(sExpectedVersion);
if (dCurrent >= dExpected)
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3  
You really shouldn't store version numbers in doubles. They are prone to round-off. Use decimal. –  Instance Hunter Jan 4 '11 at 14:44

Here are some additional possibilities including the useragent, but it eventually links back to the blog post you mentioned.

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Try this one:

string GetFrameWorkVersion()
    {
        return System.Runtime.InteropServices.RuntimeEnvironment.GetSystemVersion();
    }
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2  
This is giving 2.0 even if it is running with 3.5 –  Lijo Feb 28 '13 at 5:43
    
RuntimeEnvironment.GetSystemVersion() seems to return the CLR version, not the .NET version. MSDN Page –  marchica May 23 '14 at 18:13

Little large, but looks like it is up-to-date to Microsoft oddities:

    public static class Versions
    {
        static Version 
            _NET;

        static SortedList<String,Version>
            _NETInstalled;

#if NET40
#else
        public static bool VersionTry(String S, out Version V)
        {
            try
            { 
                V=new Version(S); 
                return true;
            }
            catch
            {
                V=null;
                return false;
            }
        }
#endif
        const string _NetFrameWorkKey = "SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\NET Framework Setup\\NDP";
        static void FillNetInstalled()
        {
            if (_NETInstalled == null)
            {
                _NETInstalled = new SortedList<String, Version>(StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase);
                RegistryKey
                    frmks = Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey(_NetFrameWorkKey);
                string[]
                    names = frmks.GetSubKeyNames();
                foreach (string name in names)
                {
                    if (name.StartsWith("v", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) && name.Length > 1)
                    {
                        string
                            f, vs;
                        Version
                            v;
                        vs = name.Substring(1);
                        if (vs.IndexOf('.') < 0)
                            vs += ".0";
#if NET40
                        if (Version.TryParse(vs, out v))
#else
                        if (VersionTry(vs, out v))
#endif
                        {
                            f = String.Format("{0}.{1}", v.Major, v.Minor);
#if NET40
                            if (Version.TryParse((string)frmks.OpenSubKey(name).GetValue("Version"), out v))
#else
                            if (VersionTry((string)frmks.OpenSubKey(name).GetValue("Version"), out v))
#endif
                            {
                                if (!_NETInstalled.ContainsKey(f) || v.CompareTo(_NETInstalled[f]) > 0)
                                    _NETInstalled[f] = v;
                            }
                            else
                            { // parse variants
                                Version
                                    best = null;
                                if (_NETInstalled.ContainsKey(f))
                                    best = _NETInstalled[f];
                                string[]
                                    varieties = frmks.OpenSubKey(name).GetSubKeyNames();
                                foreach (string variety in varieties)
#if NET40
                                    if (Version.TryParse((string)frmks.OpenSubKey(name + '\\' + variety).GetValue("Version"), out v))
#else
                                    if (VersionTry((string)frmks.OpenSubKey(name + '\\' + variety).GetValue("Version"), out v))
#endif
                                    {
                                        if (best == null || v.CompareTo(best) > 0)
                                        {
                                            _NETInstalled[f] = v;
                                            best = v;
                                        }
                                        vs = f + '.' + variety;
                                        if (!_NETInstalled.ContainsKey(vs) || v.CompareTo(_NETInstalled[vs]) > 0)
                                            _NETInstalled[vs] = v;
                                    }
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        } // static void FillNetInstalled()

        public static Version NETInstalled
        {
            get
            {
                FillNetInstalled();
                return _NETInstalled[_NETInstalled.Keys[_NETInstalled.Count-1]];
            }
        } // NETInstalled

        public static Version NET
        {
            get
            {
                FillNetInstalled();
                string
                    clr = String.Format("{0}.{1}", Environment.Version.Major, Environment.Version.Minor);
                Version
                    found = _NETInstalled[_NETInstalled.Keys[_NETInstalled.Count-1]];
                if(_NETInstalled.ContainsKey(clr))
                    return _NETInstalled[clr];

                for (int i = _NETInstalled.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
                    if (_NETInstalled.Keys[i].CompareTo(clr) < 0)
                        return found;
                    else
                        found = _NETInstalled[_NETInstalled.Keys[i]];
                return found;
            }
        } // NET
    }
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As of version 4.5 Microsoft changed the way it stores the .NET Framework indicator in the registry. There official guidance on how to retrieve the .NET framework and the CLR versions can be found here: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh925568(v=vs.110).aspx

I am including modified version of their code to address the bounty question of how you determine the .NET framework for 4.5 and higher here:

using System;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using Microsoft.Win32;

namespace stackoverflowtesting
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Dictionary<int, String> mappings = new Dictionary<int, string>();

            mappings[378389] = "4.5";
            mappings[378675] = "4.5.1 on Windows 8.1";
            mappings[378758] = "4.5.1 on Windows 8, Windows 7 SP1, and Vista";
            mappings[379893] = "4.5.2";
            mappings[393295] = "4.6 on Windows 10";
            mappings[393297] = "4.6 on Windows not 10";

            using (RegistryKey ndpKey = RegistryKey.OpenBaseKey(RegistryHive.LocalMachine, RegistryView.Registry32).OpenSubKey("SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\NET Framework Setup\\NDP\\v4\\Full\\"))
            {
                int releaseKey = Convert.ToInt32(ndpKey.GetValue("Release"));
                if (true)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Version: " + mappings[releaseKey]);
                }
            }
            int a = Console.Read();
        }
    }
}
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