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I need to split a string into words, but also get the starting and ending offset of the words. So, for example, if the input string is:

input_string = "ONE  ONE ONE   \t TWO TWO ONE TWO TWO THREE"

I want to get:

[('ONE', 0, 2), ('ONE', 5, 7), ('ONE', 9, 11), ('TWO', 17, 19), ('TWO', 21, 23),
 ('ONE', 25, 27), ('TWO', 29, 31), ('TWO', 33, 35), ('THREE', 37, 41)]

I've got some working code that does this using input_string.split and calls to .index, but it's slow. I tried to code it by manually iterating through the string, but that was slower still. Does anyone have a fast algorithm for this?

Here are my two versions:

def using_split(line):
    words = line.split()
    offsets = []
    running_offset = 0
    for word in words:
        word_offset = line.index(word, running_offset)
        word_len = len(word)
        running_offset = word_offset + word_len
        offsets.append((word, word_offset, running_offset - 1))

    return offsets

def manual_iteration(line):
    start = 0
    offsets = []
    word = ''
    for off, char in enumerate(line + ' '):
        if char in ' \t\r\n':
            if off > start:
                offsets.append((word, start, off - 1))
            start = off + 1
            word = ''
        else:
            word += char

    return offsets

By using timeit, "using_split" is the fastest, followed by "manual_iteration", then the slowest so far is using re.finditer as suggested below.

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1  
Can we see your code? –  Dogbert Mar 1 '12 at 15:25
    
I've edited the question. –  xorsyst Mar 1 '12 at 17:12
1  
If you have any long words with repeated characters, line.index(word[0], running_offset) is faster than line.index(word, running_offset) (unless you have a lot of white space). you could go (i for i,c in enumerate(word) of c==word[0]).next() –  robert king Mar 12 '12 at 4:26
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10 Answers 10

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+50

The following runs slightly faster - it saves about 30%. All I did was define the functions in advance:

def using_split2(line, _len=len):
    words = line.split()
    index = line.index
    offsets = []
    append = offsets.append
    running_offset = 0
    for word in words:
        word_offset = index(word, running_offset)
        word_len = _len(word)
        running_offset = word_offset + word_len
        append((word, word_offset, running_offset - 1))
    return offsets
share|improve this answer
    
Wow - I'm surprised by that! For me, CPython gets only 15% off, and with PyPy it made it slightly worse. I'll hold the bounty for a little, to give others some time for something more impressive :) –  xorsyst Mar 8 '12 at 14:21
    
It could well be implementation specific, and pypy isn't designed for speed. I got 0.020s for your example and 0.013s for mine. –  aquavitae Mar 8 '12 at 14:24
    
This biggest expense is the for loop, and that is a short as it can be at the moment. Depending on how you're using it, you may get an overall increase in performance by turning it into a generator, but if you do actually want a list out of it that only slows it down. –  aquavitae Mar 8 '12 at 14:59
    
I like the idea of using a generator instead, and their may be some saving in that as the calling code may not use all of the results, but it will take me longer to test. –  xorsyst Mar 8 '12 at 15:12
    
If this is just part of a larger problem I would suggest using a profiler and trying to pinpoint where the problem is. Making the function faster will help, but so will reducing the number of calls to it. If there is any chance that it won't use all the results then I would definitely suggest a generator! –  aquavitae Mar 8 '12 at 15:20
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The following will do it:

import re
s = 'ONE  ONE ONE   \t TWO TWO ONE TWO TWO THREE'
ret = [(m.group(0), m.start(), m.end() - 1) for m in re.finditer(r'\S+', s)]
print(ret)

This produces:

[('ONE', 0, 2), ('ONE', 5, 7), ('ONE', 9, 11), ('TWO', 17, 19), ('TWO', 21, 23),
 ('ONE', 25, 27), ('TWO', 29, 31), ('TWO', 33, 35), ('THREE', 37, 41)]
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2  
Nice, elegant answer. Turns out to be slower though :( –  xorsyst Mar 1 '12 at 17:13
    
@xorsyst, how big is the speed difference between this solution and using_split? –  utapyngo Mar 8 '12 at 14:44
    
This one comes in at about 1.6 times a long as using_split –  xorsyst Mar 8 '12 at 15:05
    
@xorsyst: did you try it with a compiled re expression? –  Joel Cornett Mar 11 '12 at 22:57
    
@JoelCornett: that certainly speeds it up in testing, but it's till slower - now about 1.3 times as long as using_split() –  xorsyst Mar 12 '12 at 8:58
show 3 more comments
def split_span(s):
    for match in re.finditer(r"\S+", s):
        span = match.span()
        yield match.group(0), span[0], span[1] - 1
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I was able to get about a 35% speedup in a few minutes by outright cheating: I converted your using_split() function into a C-based python module using cython. This was the first excuse I've ever had to try cython, and I see that it's pretty easy and rewarding -- see below.

Punting into C was a last resort: First I spent a few hours messing around trying to find a faster algorithm than your using_split() version. The thing is, the native python str.split() is surprisingly fast, faster than anything I tried using numpy or re, for instance. So even though you're scanning the string twice, str.split() is fast enough that it doesn't seem to matter, at least not for this particular test data.

To use cython, I put your parser in a file named parser.pyx:

===================== parser.pyx ==============================
def using_split(line):
    words = line.split()
    offsets = []
    running_offset = 0
    for word in words:
        word_offset = line.index(word, running_offset)
        word_len = len(word)
        running_offset = word_offset + word_len
        offsets.append((word, word_offset, running_offset - 1))
    return offsets
===============================================================

Then I ran this to install cython (assuming a debian-ish Linux box):

sudo apt-get install cython

Then I called the parser from this python script:

================== using_cython.py ============================

#!/usr/bin/python

import pyximport; pyximport.install()
import parser

input_string = "ONE  ONE ONE   \t TWO TWO ONE TWO TWO THREE"

def parse():
    return parser.using_split(input_string)

===============================================================

To test, I ran this:

python -m timeit "import using_cython; using_cython.parse();"

On my machine, your pure-python using_split() function averages around 8.5 usec runtime, while my cython version averages around 5.5 usec.

More details at http://docs.cython.org/src/userguide/source_files_and_compilation.html

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Have you tried cythonizing the code? docs.cython.org/src/quickstart/cythonize.html –  WolframH Mar 13 '12 at 19:31
    
I will, when cython.org recovers from whatever Bad Thing is happening to it right now. :-} –  stevegt Mar 13 '12 at 23:16
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Warning, the speed of this solution is limited by the speed of light:

def get_word_context(input_string):
    start = 0
    for word in input_string.split():
        c = word[0] #first character
        start = input_string.find(c,start)
        end = start + len(word) - 1
        yield (word,start,end)
        start = end + 2

print list(get_word_context("ONE  ONE ONE   \t TWO TWO ONE TWO TWO THREE"))

[('ONE', 0, 2), ('ONE', 5, 7), ('ONE', 9, 11), ('TWO', 17, 19), ('TWO', 21, 23), ('ONE', 25, 27), ('TWO', 29, 31), ('TWO', 33, 35), ('THREE', 37, 41)]

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I'm afraid this tests slightly slower than my using_split() –  xorsyst Mar 12 '12 at 8:55
    
Could I please see your test data? –  robert king Mar 12 '12 at 9:26
    
I'm using the string given, and using Timer to test it. –  xorsyst Mar 12 '12 at 14:08
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The following ideas may result in speed-ups:

  1. Use a deque rather than a list to store the offsets and converting to a list only on return. Deque appends do not result in memory moves like a list append does.
  2. If the words are known to be shorter than some length, provide this in the index function.
  3. Define your functions in the local dictionary.

Note: I haven't tested these but here is an example

from collections import deque

def using_split(line):
    MAX_WORD_LENGTH = 10
    line_index = line.index

    words = line.split()

    offsets = deque()
    offsets_append = offsets.append

    running_offset = 0

    for word in words:
        word_offset = line_index(word, running_offset, running_offset+MAX_WORD_LENGTH)
        running_offset = word_offset + len(word)
        offsets_append((word, word_offset, running_offset - 1))

    return list(offsets)
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Nice ideas, but they didn't help I'm afraid –  xorsyst Mar 8 '12 at 15:09
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Here you have some c-oriented approach, that only iterates once over the complete string. You can also define your own seperators. Tested and works, but could probably be cleaner.

def mySplit(myString, mySeperators):
    w = []
    o = 0
    iW = False
    word = [None, None,None]
    for i,c in enumerate(myString):
        if not c in mySeperators:
            if not iW:
                word[1]=i
                iW = True
        if iW == True and c in mySeperators:
            word[2]=i-1
            word[0] = myString[word[1]:i]
            w.append(tuple(word))
            word=[None,None,None]
            iW = False
    return w

mySeperators = [" ", "\t"]
myString = "ONE  ONE ONE   \t TWO TWO ONE TWO TWO THREE"
splitted = mySplit(myString, mySeperators)
print splitted
share|improve this answer
    
This is similar to my manual_iteration approach above, only much slower for some reason. But thanks for the attempt. –  xorsyst Mar 9 '12 at 9:08
    
probably because I used a list for the seperators. Thinking about it, it's probably not a good idea to iterate in python, because the higher level string functions are implemented in efficient C-Code. –  Markus Mar 12 '12 at 12:41
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This seems to work pretty quickly:

tuple_list = [(match.group(), match.start(), match.end()) for match in re.compile("\S+").finditer(input_string)]
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Here are a couple of ideas which you could profile to see if they are fast enough:

input_string = "".join([" ","ONE  ONE ONE   \t TWO TWO ONE TWO TWO THREE"," "])

#pre processing
from itertools import chain
stuff = list(chain(*zip(range(len(input_string)),range(len(input_string)))))
print stuff
stuff = iter(stuff)
next(stuff)

#calculate
switches = (i for i in range(0,len(input_string)-1) if (input_string[next(stuff)] in " \t\r\n") ^ (input_string[next(stuff)] in " \t\r\n"))
print [(word,next(switches),next(switches)-1) for word in input_string.split()]


#pre processing
from itertools import chain
stuff = list(chain(*zip(range(len(input_string)),range(len(input_string)))))
print stuff
stuff = iter(stuff)
next(stuff)


#calculate
switches = (i for i in range(0,len(input_string)-1) if (input_string[next(stuff)] in " \t\r\n") ^ (input_string[next(stuff)] in " \t\r\n"))
print [(input_string[i:j+1],i,j-1) for i,j in zip(switches,switches)]
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Much slower I'm afraid –  xorsyst Mar 12 '12 at 14:19
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It occurs to me the python loop is the slow operation here, thus I started on bitmaps, I got this far and it's still fast, but I can't figure out a loop-free way to get start/stop indices out it:

import string
table = "".join([chr(i).isspace() and "0" or "1" for i in range(256)])
def indexed6(line):
    binline = string.translate(line, table)
    return int(binline, 2) ^ int(binline+"0", 2)

The returned integer has bits set for each start position and each stop+1 position.

P.S. zip() is relatively slow: fast enough to be used once, too slow to be used 3 times.

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