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Here's a puzzle. Basic page, one element:

http://jsfiddle.net/PZj6t/

HTML:

<div id="container"></div>​

CSS:

body, html {
    height: 100%;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    background-color: black;
}
#container {
    position: relative;
    margin: 0 auto;
    width: 400px;
    height: 100%;
    background-color: #666;
}
​

That one looks how I want, with the #container neatly flush to the top. But when I add a nested element:

http://jsfiddle.net/PZj6t/1/

HTML:

<div id="container">
    <nav id="topnav"></nav>
</div>​

CSS (new):

#topnav {
    width: 100%;
    height: 40px;
    margin: 30px 0;
    background-color: red;
}
​

The container jumps down. It seems that the margin-top from #topnav is somehow being passed to the container, and now the page has a scrollbar I don't want. (I'm testing in Chrome.) How do I prevent this?

(As a further mystery, if I add border: 1px solid white; to the #container's CSS, the jump disappears. Which would be fine, except that also adds two pixels worth of undesirable scroll to the page.)

share|improve this question
1  
You're adding a margin to something that is already 100% high. Use padding instead. –  Diodeus Mar 1 '12 at 15:40
    
@Diodeus The nav isn't 100% height, the container is. The container has no vertical margin declared. –  Blazemonger Mar 1 '12 at 15:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is due to a feature of CSS called margin collapsing. If there is no padding or border on a parent element, the parent and its child's margins "collapse" to the greater value of the two and is essentially applied to the parent.

For your situation, I would suggest simply adding an additional inner wrap within the container, and throwing some padding on it to simulate the margin effect you're looking for: http://jsfiddle.net/PZj6t/3/

Anything within the #inner div or below should behave as you expect, as margins only collapse when they are at the edge of their parent (and no padding or borders are present).

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Interesting feature -- I knew margins collapsed for adjacent elements, but I never noticed it also applied to nested elements. In all my years as a developer it never affected my work until now. –  Blazemonger Mar 1 '12 at 16:16
display:inline-block;

On Your nav element appears will fix this. Its to do with margin-collapsing see here for more detail.

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This certainly seems like the simplest solution, although I have to adjust my margins on other elements after the #topnav. –  Blazemonger Mar 1 '12 at 15:54

Jblasco is correct, this is a neater solution though: http://jsfiddle.net/PZj6t/4/

#container {
    position: relative;
    margin: -1px auto 0;
    width: 400px;
    height: 100%;
    padding-top:1px;
    background-color: #666;
}
#topnav {
    width: 100%;
    height: 40px;
    margin: 29px 0 30px;
    background-color: red;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Adding any kind of padding with height: 100% will result in a vertical scrollbar on the page. Maybe if he used display: border-box on #container this would be an okay solution. –  jblasco Mar 1 '12 at 15:46
    
Negative margin would do it. Bit inelegant though.... :( –  daveyfaherty Mar 1 '12 at 15:50
    
Also by display: border-box I meant box-sizing: border-box. I still feel like messing with box-sizing or using negative margins is kind of sketchy though. –  jblasco Mar 1 '12 at 15:55
    
I'm trying to avoid CSS3 solutions. –  Blazemonger Mar 1 '12 at 16:10
#container {
    margin: 0 auto;
    width: 400px;
    height: 100%;
    background-color: #666;
    border:1px solid;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/PZj6t/12/

Update:

http://jsfiddle.net/PZj6t/1/
apply display:inline-block; on both container and topnav

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Please read the last paragraph of my question. –  Blazemonger Mar 1 '12 at 16:15

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