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I may be missing something but what is the difference between doing:

public void MyMethod()
{
  Task t = new Task.Factory.StartNew(DoSomethingThatTakesTime);
  t.Wait();
  UpdateLabelToSayItsComplete();
}

public async void MyMethod()
{
  var result = Task.Factory.StartNew(DoSomethingThatTakesTime);
  await result;
  UpdateLabelToSayItsComplete();
}

private void DoSomethingThatTakesTime()
{
  Thread.Sleep(10000);
}
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6  
Question, why do you use "new Task.Factory.StartNew..." instead of Task.Factory.StartNew...? –  julio.g Oct 23 '13 at 17:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 110 down vote accepted

I may be missing something

You are.

what is the difference between doing Task.Wait and await task?

You order your lunch from the waiter at the restaurant. A moment after giving your order, a friend walks in and sits down next to you and starts a conversation. Now you have two choices. You can ignore your friend until the task is complete -- you can wait until your soup arrives and do nothing else while you are waiting. Or you can respond to your friend, and when your friend stops talking, the waiter will bring you your soup.

Task.Wait blocks until the task is complete -- you ignore your friend until the task is complete. await keeps processing messages in the message queue, and when the task is complete, it enqueues a message that says "pick up where you left off after that await". You talk to your friend, and when there is a break in the conversation the soup arrives.

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16  
And now I'm hungry :) Any chance of some demo code? –  Jon Mar 1 '12 at 16:08
1  
Isn't Task.Wait a cooperative block? i.e. it will not block the thread just pick a another task from the task pool and execute that while the timeout is still active. –  ronag Oct 30 '12 at 13:44
4  
Nice example! Soup has arrived ! –  Toan Nguyen Dec 17 '12 at 23:07
1  
awesome simple analogy! –  Alex Peta Mar 20 '13 at 21:06
1  
@ronag No, it's not. How would you like it if waiting for a Task that takes 10 ms would actually execute a 10 hour-long Task on your thread, thus blocking you for the whole 10 hours? –  svick Apr 20 '13 at 11:10

In this example, not much, practically. If you are awaiting a Task that returns on a different thread (like a WCF call) or relinquishes control to the operating system (like File IO), await will use less system resources by not blocking a thread.

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To demonstrate Eric's answer here is some code:

public void ButtonClick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  Task t = new Task.Factory.StartNew(DoSomethingThatTakesTime);
  t.Wait();  
  //If you press Button2 now you won't see anything in the console 
  //until this task is complete and then the label will be updated!
  UpdateLabelToSayItsComplete();
}

public async void ButtonClick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  var result = Task.Factory.StartNew(DoSomethingThatTakesTime);
  await result;
  //If you press Button2 now you will see stuff in the console and 
  //when the long method returns it will update the label!
  UpdateLabelToSayItsComplete();
}

public void Button_2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  Console.WriteLine("Button 2 Clicked");
}

private void DoSomethingThatTakesTime()
{
  Thread.Sleep(10000);
}
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12  
+1 for the code (it is better to run once than to read hundred times). But the phrase "//If you press Button2 now you won't see anything in the console until this task is complete and then the label will be updated!" is misleading. Upon pressing the button with t.Wait(); in button click event handler ButtonClick() it is not possible to press anything and then see something in console and update of label "until this task is complete" since the GUI is frozen and unresponsive, that is any clicks or interactions with GUI are being LOST until the completion of task waiting –  Gennady Vanin Геннадий Ванин May 5 '13 at 4:43

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