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I try to add margin values on a div inside another div. All works fine except the top value, it seems to be ignored. But why?

What I expected:
What I expected with margin:50px 50px 50px 50px;

What I get:
What I get with margin:50px 50px 50px 50px;

CSS:

#outer {
    width:500px; 
    height:200px; 
    background:#FFCCCC;
    margin:50px auto 0 auto;
    display:block;
}
#inner {
    background:#FFCC33;
    margin:50px 50px 50px 50px;
    padding:10px;
    display:block;
}

HTML:

<div id="outer">
    <div id="inner">
        Hello world!
    </div>
</div>

W3Schools have no explanation to why margin behave this way.

share|improve this question
1  
did you try floating the inner one? –  Rooster Mar 1 '12 at 16:20
2  
hum.. With float:left; it works... but why is this needed. I do not want it to float. And why does margin for left/right work? –  jamietelin Mar 1 '12 at 16:22
7  
Welcome to the fun world of the CSS margin collapse algorithm! –  GordonM Mar 1 '12 at 16:27
5  
W3Schools vs. W3CDocs... I think we have a winner. :D –  enderskill Mar 1 '12 at 17:41
2  
jsFiddle of it, to save the next guy 25 seconds jsfiddle.net/kLeu9 –  Imray Dec 10 '13 at 13:13

10 Answers 10

up vote 162 down vote accepted

You're actually seeing the top margin of the #inner element collapse into the top edge of the #outer element, leaving only the #outer margin intact (albeit not shown in your images). The top edges of both boxes are flush against each other because their margins are equal.

Here are the relevant points from the W3C spec:

8.3.1 Collapsing margins

In CSS, the adjoining margins of two or more boxes (which might or might not be siblings) can combine to form a single margin. Margins that combine this way are said to collapse, and the resulting combined margin is called a collapsed margin.

Adjoining vertical margins collapse [...]

Two margins are adjoining if and only if:

  • both belong to in-flow block-level boxes that participate in the same block formatting context
  • no line boxes, no clearance, no padding and no border separate them
  • both belong to vertically-adjacent box edges, i.e. form one of the following pairs:
    • top margin of a box and top margin of its first in-flow child

The reason why doing any of the following prevents the margin collapse:

Is because:

  • Margins between a floated box and any other box do not collapse (not even between a float and its in-flow children).
  • Margins of elements that establish new block formatting contexts (such as floats and elements with 'overflow' other than 'visible') do not collapse with their in-flow children.
  • Margins of inline-block boxes do not collapse (not even with their in-flow children).

The left and right margins behave as you expect because:

Horizontal margins never collapse.

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12  
Aaaah, thanks just the information I was looking for. Still it is pretty stupid and not logical. –  jamietelin Mar 1 '12 at 16:29
5  
I'll just say that it takes a little getting used to :) –  BoltClock Mar 1 '12 at 16:37
3  
Apparently, you're not the only one to think it's stupid... –  BoltClock Mar 11 '12 at 5:02
    
This answer rocks! Just something to add. Your quote of w3c says it but I only realized now. So just to be clear for others you could also give #outer a border. –  driechel Feb 23 at 22:55

Try using display: inline-block; on the inner div.

#outer {
    width:500px; 
    height:200px; 
    background:#FFCCCC;
    margin:50px auto 0 auto;
    display:block;
}
#inner {
    background:#FFCC33;
    margin:50px 50px 50px 50px;
    padding:10px;
    display:inline-block;
}
share|improve this answer
4  
Good answer. Would be better if it explained why this change fixes the problem. –  JohnFx Mar 1 '12 at 16:23
    
Ok, that is freaky! Why does that work? What is the logical explanation to why it doesn't work as one would expect. Margin left / right works without display:inline-block;. Also set back for when using display:inline-block; is that you lose the width of 100% on the div. –  jamietelin Mar 1 '12 at 16:25
1  
switching it to inline-block forces the browser to reevaluate the size of the div after its placed and other rules are applied. –  Rooster Mar 1 '12 at 16:26

If you add any padding to #outer, it works.

Demo

#outer {
    width:500px; 
    height:200px; 
    background:#FFCCCC;
    margin:50px auto 0 auto;
    display:block;
    padding-top:1px;
}
share|improve this answer

Not exactly sure why, but changing the inner CSS to

display:inline-block;

seems to work;

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Not sure why what you have doesn't work, but you can add

overflow: auto;

to the outer div.

share|improve this answer
    
Loads of different solutions to this problem. Thanks! This answer combined with @BoltClock´s answer provides good information on why this solution does work. –  jamietelin Mar 1 '12 at 16:31

Doesn't answer the "why" (has to be something w/ collapsing margin), but seems like the easiest/most logical way to do what you're trying to do would be to just add padding-top to the outer div:

http://jsfiddle.net/hpU5d/1/

Minor note - it shouldn't be necessary to set a div to display:block; unless there's something else in your code telling it not to be block.

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try this:

#outer {
    width:500px; 
    height:200px; 
    background:#FFCCCC;
    margin:50px auto 0 auto;
    display:table;
}
#inner {
    background:#FFCC33;
    margin:50px 50px 50px 50px;
    padding:10px;
    display:block;
}​

http://jsfiddle.net/7AXTf/

Good luck

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Use padding-top:50pxfor outer div. Something like this:

#outer {
    width:500px; 
    height:200px; 
    background:#FFCCCC;
    margin:50px auto 0 auto;
    display:table;}

Note: padding will increase the size of your div. In this case if the size of your div is important, I mean if it must have a specific height. decrease the height by 50px.:

#outer {
    width:500px; 
    height:150px; 
    background:#FFCCCC;
    margin:50px auto 0 auto;
    display:table;}
share|improve this answer

I guess setting the position property of the #inner div to relative may also help achieve the effect. But anyways I tried the original code pasted in the Question on IE9 and latest Google Chrome and they already give the desirable effect without any modifications.

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Have you tried !important before all, it will force everything:

margin:50px 50px 50px 50px !important;
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