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I have a class and two methods. One method gets input from the user and stores it in two variables, x and y. I want another method that accepts an input so adds that input to x and y. When I run calculate(z) for some number z, it gives me errors saying the global variables x and y aren't defined. Obviously this means that the calculate method isn't getting access to x and y from getinput(). What am I doing wrong?

class simpleclass (object):
    def getinput (self):
            x = input("input value for x: ")
            y = input("input value for y: ")
    def calculate (self, z):
            print x+y+z
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1  
use raw_input –  Karoly Horvath Mar 1 '12 at 16:33
    
@yi_H : could you please explain why raw_input() would be preferred over input()? –  Li-aung Yip Mar 2 '12 at 6:06

4 Answers 4

These need to be instance variables:

class simpleclass(object):
   def __init__(self):
      self.x = None
      self.y = None

   def getinput (self):
        self.x = input("input value for x: ")
        self.y = input("input value for y: ")

   def calculate (self, z):
        print self.x+self.y+z
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+1 for most correct answer illustrating use of the __init__() method. –  Li-aung Yip Mar 1 '12 at 16:38

You want to use self.x and self.y. Like so:

class simpleclass (object):
    def getinput (self):
            self.x = input("input value for x: ")
            self.y = input("input value for y: ")
    def calculate (self, z):
            print self.x+self.y+z
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@DSM: D'oh! Good catch. Edited to fix. –  Li-aung Yip Mar 1 '12 at 16:37

Inside classes, there's a variable called self you can use:

class Example(object):
    def getinput(self):
        self.x = input("input value for x: ")
    def calculate(self, z):
        print self.x + z
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x and y are local variables. they get destroyed when you move out from the scope of that function.

class simpleclass (object):
    def getinput (self):
            self.x = raw_input("input value for x: ")
            self.y = raw_input("input value for y: ")
    def calculate (self, z):
            print int(self.x)+int(self.y)+z
share|improve this answer
    
Probably want to get a number from the string at some point if you're switching to raw_input. –  DSM Mar 1 '12 at 16:36
    
@DSM: right. thx –  Karoly Horvath Mar 1 '12 at 16:40

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