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I have an application in C# .net which has a MainForm and a few classes.
One of these classes receives incoming data messages from a network.
I need to get these message's text appended into a multi-line textbox on the MainForm.
I can send the message to a method in the MainForm by making the method static, but then the static method cannot access the MainForm's controls.

TheIncomingDataClass.cs

namespace TheApplicationName
{
     class TheIncomingDataClass
     {

     public void IncomingMessage(IncomingMessageType message)
     {
          TheApplicationName.MainForm.ReceiveMSG(message);
     }

MainForm.cs

public static void ReceiveMSG(string message)
{
     txtDisplayMessages.AppendText(message); //This line causes compile error
}

The compile error:
An object reference is required for the nonstatic field, method, or property 'TheApplicationName.MainForm.txtDisplayMessages'

Any help is appreciated.

I am still quite a C# beginner so please be descriptive.

Thanks in advance.

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9 Answers 9

up vote 9 down vote accepted

A static method doesn't have access to members like txtDisplayMessages because it is not a part of that instance. I suggest you do some reading on the concepts of static methods and whatnot, because that is a fairly language agnostic concept. That method would best be served by removing the static modifier, because it doesn't need to be static - it appears that it would need to be called by that particular instance of that object.

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Once I remove the static keyword from the method I can no longer call it from the IncomingData Class. I don't understand what you mean by "called by that particular instance of that object" could you explain further? keep in mind that I need these messages to be sent to textbox immediately upon receiving them, so the event would be the receiving of a message. Thanks. –  timmyg Jun 4 '09 at 17:51
    
I assume since it is static that you were calling it with MainForm. ReceiveMSG()[or just ReceiveMSG()]. It would have to be called from a specific instance of MainForm, (MainForm mf = new MainForm(); or similar, to create an instnance). Then, you could call it as mf. ReceiveMSG(), replacing mf with whatever you named your instance of MainForm. No offense, but I think you need to read some language-agnostic literature on object orientation, learn what all this means, and then see how C# syntax relates to it. –  Annath Jun 4 '09 at 17:58
    
Seriously, you should grab CLR Via C#. Its an easy read (SKIP THE FIRST COUPLE OF CHAPTERS) and goes into good detail about this and more! –  Will Jun 4 '09 at 18:00
    
OK I think I understand now. No offense taken, I know I need to read/learn more I'm still in the process of doing so. This project of mine is mostly for the purpose of learning. Thanks again. And I'll look for that book Will, thx. –  timmyg Jun 4 '09 at 18:09

To continue the way you've been doing it, your "TheIncomingDataClass" should have a reference to the MainForm object with which it should interface. When you create an instance of this class (presumably from an instance method of MainForm), you will need to pass in a reference to this MainForm object.

class TheIncomingDataClass{
    MainForm form;

    public TheIncomingDataClass(MainForm form){
        this.form = form;
    }
}

class MainForm : Form{
    MainForm(){
        new TheIncomingDataClass(this);
    }
}

However, as suggested by Bugs, you probably would be better off making this an event on TheIncomingDataClass and subscribing to it from MainForm.

class IncomingMessageEventArgs : EventArgs{
    IncomingMessageType message;

    public IncomingMessageType Message{get{return message;}}

    public IncomingMessageEventArgs(IncomingMessageType message){
        this.message = message;
    }
}

class TheIncomingDataClass{
    public event EventHandler<IncomingMessageEventArgs> MessageReceived;

    protected virtual void OnMessageReceived(IncomingMessageEventArgs e){
        if(MessageReceived != null)
            MessageReceived(this, e);
    }

    public void IncomingMessage(IncomingMessageType message){
        OnMessageReceived(new IncomingMessageEventArgs(message));
    }
}

class MainForm : Form{
    MainForm(){
        new TheIncomingDataClass().MessageReceived +=
            (s, e)=>txtDisplayMessages.AppendText(e.Message.ToString());
    }
}
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I am trying to use your method and all goes well except the last part in the MainForm. "(s, e)=>txtDisplayMessages.AppendText(e.Message.ToString());" This line of code returns many compile errors. Specifically the (s, e) part. –  timmyg Jun 5 '09 at 17:21

raise an event from class which the form can subscribe to.

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Its possible to pass in a reference to the current form like this:

public static void ReceiveMSG(string message, MainForm mainform)
{
     mainform.txtDisplayMessages.AppendText(message); 
}

Although as suggested an event is probably a better way of doing it.

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Just remove the static modifier, you don't need it for your purposes. Read about statics here.

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You can solve this problem by removing the static keyword.

When you see "static", think: without an instance of this type.

When you call a non-static method, you must explicitly use some instance. The method can access that instance using the "this" keyword.

When you call a static method, there is no instance - you have abandoned the boundaries of OO and are now in a structural or functional programming context. If you want an instance of something, you need to bring it in as a parameter.

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I think you might be taking the wrong approach on this. It sounds like you are trying to push messages to a client from an external process. There are ways to do this, but it will get complicated. My suggestion would be to have the client poll whatever process has the data periodically - maybe every 10 seconds depending on your needs. This is going to be a heck of a lot easier than pushing from server to client.

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Jonathan - why would polling be worse if he's using remoting? As far as threading, I'm not sure what approach you are suggesting, but most of the suggestions below seem to involve events - if you use events, you are going to have the same threading issues. Since he said he's a beginner, I'm only suggesting the simplest approach that will work - slap a timer on there and check for new messages every x seconds. If you are going to update ui, call invoke - you'll have to do same thing if you go the event route. –  Rob Jun 4 '09 at 18:20
    
-Um, no, a timer runs on a different thread. -You are assuming that the data source on the same machine, the author never defined that. He simply said the source was "incoming data messages from a network" - this could be a lot of different things, but implies that at the very least, the source is not in the same appdomain. Now - given that the author has limited experience and that he's dealing w/ communicating w/ multiple processes - do you think he's going to understand how to consume remoted events? Just trying to throw out an option he may not have thought of that would be easy to do. –  Rob Jun 4 '09 at 21:25
    
I stand corrected, I have retracted my other comments. I did make the assumption that his network code would be in the same AppDomain. In any case: <msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…;: "This Windows timer is designed for a single-threaded environment[...]" His UI will block. It's even easier to test <pastebin.com/m61c0884c>;. –  Jonathan C Dickinson Jun 4 '09 at 21:38
    
Thanks for keeping an open mind. That's a nice find on the timer, I assumed that the events were processed on a background thread. In that case, I guess that the polling operation would have to be pretty quick or the author would have to look into running the polling operation on a different thread if he's worried about hanging the UI for the duration of the call. –  Rob Jun 5 '09 at 1:06

Ok here goes. Static methods can access only static members. Your ReceiveMSG method is static. txtDisplayMessages is not and hence you cant access it. Why does your method need to be static? Needless to say, if you remove the static keyword that will fix your problem.

Just make ReceiveMSG part of a class, create an instance of the class and then call the method on the instance.

I think you should post the kind the solution you are expecting.

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Seeing as you are new to C# I will keep this as simple as possible. You should have a Program.cs file that has a single method Main (this would have been generated by Visual Studio). You will need to make it look like the following:

class Program
{
    public static readonly MainForm MainForm;

    static void Main()
    {
        Application.EnableVisualStyles();
        MainForm = new MainForm(); // These two lines
        Application.Run(MainForm); // are the important ones.
    }
}

Now in your incoming message you will have a way to access that form.

 public void IncomingMessage(IncomingMessageType message)
 {
      Program.MainForm.RecieveMSG(message);
 }

That method in the form would then be a instance (not static) method. E.g.

 public void RecieveMSG(IncomingMessageType message) // NB: No static
 {
     txtDisplayMessages.Text = message.Text; // Or whatever.
 }

There are better ways to do it - but as a beginner I think this would be the best approach.

The difference between static and instance (instance is when you don't say static) is huge. To get to an instance method, field or property (which are collectively called members in C#) you need to have the containing instance. So:

 Person p = new Person(); // You now have an instance.
 p.Name = "Fred"; // You are using an instance property.

Static are the opposite, they are the same anywhere in your application (more technically within the same AppDomain - but if you are a beginner you won't need to worry about that for a while). You don't need an instance to get to them (props to codewidgets "Static methods can access only static members"). For example:

 // Where Planet is a class and People is a static property.
 // Somewhat confusingly the Add method is an instance - best left for the student :).
 Planet.People.Add(new Person("Fred"));

Hopefully that gives you a good indication of what static and instance is and where to use them. The most important thing though is to try and avoid static members as best as you can - they can cause maintenance nightmares.

Microsoft has a whole write-up on the important concepts in regard to this.

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How does having a static member create a maintenance nightmare? –  Rob Jun 4 '09 at 18:34
    
It makes refactoring harder. Time and time again I have dug myself into a hole with it - especially in terms of threading. It's best to learn how to work without too many static members early on. –  Jonathan C Dickinson Jun 4 '09 at 20:41
    
I guess you could create a nightmare for yourself if you don't understand OOD or how to write maintainable code, but that would be the developers fault. As far as threading is concerned, developers just need to understand how to write thread safe code. .Net has a lot of nice classes to assist with this. Static members have their place and understanding them is critical to some very important software design patterns. I would never tell anyone to stay away from them. –  Rob Jun 4 '09 at 21:06
    
Indeed. I just find it easier to use context classes and service provision these days. Maintainability and what I would call 'morphability' are not the same thing - I could teach a chimp OOD and how to write maintainable code. If the requirements (or host) for your application changes rapidly and vastly; static members will be, guaranteed, your nemesis. I have only one static field (Dictionary<string,string>) in that legacy code and it kicked my ass. Why? Because it started off as standalone app, and now it's integrated and called multiple times async. Should have been a context class. –  Jonathan C Dickinson Jun 4 '09 at 21:20

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