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Hopefully someone can explain some odd behavior I've encountered with jQuery. The following script is looking for relative links on my page and replacing them with absolute links.

$(document).ready(function() {
  $("a[href^='/']").each(function(){ 
    var cur_href = $(this).prop("href");
    $(this).prop("href", 'http://www.mysite.com'+cur_href);
  });
});

I'm using this script on a page that will be served up over https but I don't want all of my navigation to link to https pages. Since my navigation are global includes, this seemed like the easiest way to fix the problem.

The issue I'm encountering comes in the actual replacement. The second line of the script correctly matches all relative links on the page and then runs the replacement part of the script. It is in the replacement, line 4, where I get some weird results. After this part of the script runs, my URLs end up looking like this:

http://www.mysite.comhttps//www.mysite.com/mypage.htm

Obviously isn't doing what I want. It seems like the first part of the script is matching the relative URL but when the replacement part fires the browser has already tacked on the domain information.

The only thing I've found so far that actually does what I want is to write the replacement anticipating what the browser has tacked on:

this.href = this.href.replace(/^https:\/\/www\.mysite\.com\//, "http://www.mysite.com/");

Is there a better way to do this?


Edit: here is a jsfiddle of the problem.

share|improve this question
1  
Can u make a jsfiddle for this problem ? –  nightf0x Mar 1 '12 at 17:13
1  
I've noticed before that IE will tack on the domain info, but Firefox typically does not. It is weird and unexpected, so something that has to be taken into account in your JS. –  John Fable Mar 1 '12 at 17:14
2  
[href^='/'] is an attribute selector, so perhaps .attr gives the correct result. –  pimvdb Mar 1 '12 at 17:17
1  
This may be interesting to you: paulirish.com/2010/the-protocol-relative-url –  Dagg Nabbit Mar 1 '12 at 17:17

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

jQuery isn't causing a problem here. The issue is that the href property of HTMLAnchorElement (the type of object jQuery is returning), per the spec, always contains an absolute URI.

In HTML5 href is a composite attribute and you can just swap the protocol (the part before //) at will by modifying href.protocol, e.g.:

var link = $( '<a href="https://example.com/foo">bar</a>' )[0];
console.log( link.href );
// => https://example.com/foo

link.href.protocol = 'http:';
console.log( link.href );
// => http://example.com/foo

For older browsers without the composite href you'll just have to make do with a regex:

console.log( link.href );
// => https://example.com/foo

link.href = link.href.replace( /^https:/, 'http:' );
console.log( link.href );
// => http://example.com/foo

TLDR: Your code should look something like this:

$( "a[href^='/']" ).prop( "href",
  function( _idx, oldHref ) {
    return oldHref.replace( /^https:/, 'http:' );
  }
);

P.S. You'll notice that I elided your $.each call. That's because prop automatically acts on every element in the matched set, i.e. it already does what you were doing with each.


.prop( propertyName, function(index, oldPropertyValue) )

  • propertyName The name of the property to set.
  • function(index, oldPropertyValue) A function returning the value to set. Receives the index position of the element in the set and the old property value as arguments. Within the function, the keyword this refers to the current element.
share|improve this answer
    
The code works but I'm trying to figure out how it does what it's doing. What is _idx? –  Cloudkiller Mar 1 '12 at 18:10
    
I've quoted (and linked to) the relevant section of the documentation above. _idx doesn't have any special meaning in JavaScript, it's just a variable name (it's conventional in some languages to name unused variables just "_" but I used it as a prefix instead). All prop does in this case is take the value of the given property (href) on each matched element, pass it to the anonymous function (as oldHref in my code), and then change the property to whatever the function returns. It's similar to map. –  Jordan Mar 1 '12 at 18:43
    
Thanks for the explanation and the fix. I should have checked out the .prop documentation but I was thinking _idx was referencing some type of global variable. This is a nice and elegant fix and I'm going to use it. –  Cloudkiller Mar 1 '12 at 18:49

My site is down at the moment but here's a cached link to my solution to this problem: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:AKuVvSDz5nAJ:aknosis.com/2011/07/17/using-jquery-to-rewrite-relative-urls-to-absolute-urls-revisited/+&cd=2&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us

See this jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/aknosis/kWrjr/

share|improve this answer
    
That solution works and adds in some checks that I didn't consider in my first version. –  Cloudkiller Mar 1 '12 at 18:02
    
It's an odd use case but I knew exactly what you were talking about when I read the question. Glad you found it useful :) –  Aknosis Mar 1 '12 at 18:42

This is not pretty, but it should work across browsers:

$(document).ready(function() {
  $("a[href^='/']").each(function(){ 
    var cur_href = $(this).attr("href");
    if( cur_href.indexOf( "http" ) !== -1 ) {
        $(this).attr("href", cur_href);
    } else {
        $(this).attr("href", 'http://www.mysite.com'+cur_href);
    }  
  });
});
share|improve this answer
    
This solution works. I think I like Aknosis's solution a bit more but yours is a working revision of my original script. –  Cloudkiller Mar 1 '12 at 17:59

Try something like this:

if(! /http/.test( cur_href) ){
   $(this).attr("href", 'http://www.mysite.com'+cur_href);

}
share|improve this answer

.prop() grabs the property value as opposed to the attribute value. While similar, there are some subtle, important differences -- one of which applies here. The href property on an element is always the full path. For example:

<a id="myAnchor" href="/foo.html"></a>

<script>
elem = document.getElementById('myAnchor');
$elem = $(elem);
alert(elem.href); //alerts the full path, http://www.example.com/foo.html
alert($elem.prop('href')); //same as above
alert($elem.attr('href')); //alerts just "/foo.html"
</script>

In other words, you're appending the domain to a value that is already an absolute path. Just use .attr() rather than .prop() and you'll be fine.

To see an example, open your console and go to this page: http://jsfiddle.net/JUcHU/

share|improve this answer
    
I want to agree with you but I don't think this is quite that simple. I rarely ever use prop() and always use attr() and I have seen some browsers return the full path. Specifically IE8. –  John Fable Mar 1 '12 at 17:28
    
Perhaps you're right. I tend to always just use the .href property, so I always get the full path. I imagine the OP will test this one out for us. –  maxedison Mar 1 '12 at 17:30
    
I'm testing it but it does not appear to work. –  Cloudkiller Mar 1 '12 at 17:39

try simply with

$(document).ready(function() {
  $("a[href^='/']").each(function(){ 
    var cur_href = this.href;  /* <-- access to the href attribute 
                                      through the DOM reference */  
    $(this).prop("href", 'http://www.mysite.com'+cur_href);
  });
});
share|improve this answer
    
This does not appear to change anything. –  Cloudkiller Mar 1 '12 at 17:40
    
It's identical to the OP's original problem. –  shaunsantacruz Mar 1 '12 at 17:42

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