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I am trying to develop a very simple client / server where the client converts a file to bytes, sends it to the server, and then converts the bytes back in to a file.

Currently the program just creates an empty file. I'm not a fantastic Java developer so any help much appreciated.

This is the server part that receives what the client sends.

ServerSocket serverSocket = null;

    serverSocket = new ServerSocket(4444);


    Socket socket = null;
    socket = serverSocket.accept();

    DataOutputStream out = new DataOutputStream(new BufferedOutputStream(socket.getOutputStream()));
    DataInputStream in = new DataInputStream(new BufferedInputStream(socket.getInputStream()));
    byte[] bytes = new byte[1024];

    in.read(bytes);
    System.out.println(bytes);

    FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream("C:\\test2.xml");
    fos.write(bytes);

And here is the client part

Socket socket = null;
    DataOutputStream out = null;
    DataInputStream in = null;
    String host = "127.0.0.1";     

    socket = new Socket(host, 4444);
    out = new DataOutputStream(new BufferedOutputStream(socket.getOutputStream()));
    in = new DataInputStream(new BufferedInputStream(socket.getInputStream()));

    File file = new File("C:\\test.xml");
    //InputStream is = new FileInputStream(file);
    // Get the size of the file
    long length = file.length();
    if (length > Integer.MAX_VALUE) {
        System.out.println("File is too large.");
    }
    byte[] bytes = new byte[(int) length];

    //out.write(bytes);
    System.out.println(bytes);

    out.close();
    in.close();
    socket.close();
share|improve this question
    
I bet you threw away all the exceptions... Please post the whole program. –  artbristol Mar 1 '12 at 17:27
5  
Your client doesn't write anything to its output stream, and your server ignores the result of the read method. Google for "Java IO tutorial". –  JB Nizet Mar 1 '12 at 17:30

4 Answers 4

The correct way to copy a stream in Java is as follows:

while ((count = in.read(buffer)) > 0)
{
  out.write(buffer, 0, count);
}

Wish I had a dollar for every time I've posted that in a forum.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I've looked at the read method - where you've written count, that'll be the length of the file is that correct? Also, how would you reverse that code when the bytes are received? –  Rookie Mar 3 '12 at 11:25
    
No, count is an int variable where the result of each read() method call is stored, as the code says. The code when receiving is identical, just different ins and outs. –  EJP Mar 3 '12 at 11:28

Rookie, if you want to write a file to server by socket, how about using fileoutputstream instead of dataoutputstream? dataoutputstream is more fit for protocol-level read-write. it is not very reasonable for your code in bytes reading and writing. loop to read and write is necessary in java io. and also, you use a buffer way. flush is necessary. here is a code sample: http://www.rgagnon.com/javadetails/java-0542.html

share|improve this answer
    
Ah this is useful thank you! Question - the receive code, the filesize to be received his set statically. How would you go about setting this dynamically? Is there a way of sending the file length before the bytes array maybe? –  Rookie Mar 3 '12 at 11:32
    
You can't use FileOutputStream to a socket, and there's nothing wrong with using DataOutputStream in this way. This answer doesn't make sense. –  EJP Jan 15 at 20:17
up vote 16 down vote accepted

Thanks for the help, I've managed to get it working now so thought I would post so that the others can use to help them.

Server

public class Server {

/**
 * @param args the command line arguments
 */
public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    ServerSocket serverSocket = null;

    try {
        serverSocket = new ServerSocket(4444);
    } catch (IOException ex) {
        System.out.println("Can't setup server on this port number. ");
    }

    Socket socket = null;
    InputStream is = null;
    FileOutputStream fos = null;
    BufferedOutputStream bos = null;
    int bufferSize = 0;

    try {
        socket = serverSocket.accept();
    } catch (IOException ex) {
        System.out.println("Can't accept client connection. ");
    }

    try {
        is = socket.getInputStream();

        bufferSize = socket.getReceiveBufferSize();
        System.out.println("Buffer size: " + bufferSize);
    } catch (IOException ex) {
        System.out.println("Can't get socket input stream. ");
    }

    try {
        fos = new FileOutputStream("M:\\test2.xml");
        bos = new BufferedOutputStream(fos);

    } catch (FileNotFoundException ex) {
        System.out.println("File not found. ");
    }

    byte[] bytes = new byte[bufferSize];

    int count;

    while ((count = is.read(bytes)) > 0) {
        bos.write(bytes, 0, count);
    }

    bos.flush();
    bos.close();
    is.close();
    socket.close();
    serverSocket.close();
}

}

and the Client

public class Client {

/**
 * @param args the command line arguments
 */
public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    Socket socket = null;
    String host = "127.0.0.1";

    socket = new Socket(host, 4444);

    File file = new File("M:\\test.xml");
    // Get the size of the file
    long length = file.length();
    if (length > Integer.MAX_VALUE) {
        System.out.println("File is too large.");
    }
    byte[] bytes = new byte[(int) length];
    FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(file);
    BufferedInputStream bis = new BufferedInputStream(fis);
    BufferedOutputStream out = new BufferedOutputStream(socket.getOutputStream());

    int count;

    while ((count = bis.read(bytes)) > 0) {
        out.write(bytes, 0, count);
    }

    out.flush();
    out.close();
    fis.close();
    bis.close();
    socket.close();

}

}

share|improve this answer
    
There is no reason to waste space by allocating a buffer the size of the entire file: this doesn't scale to large files, or work at all for files over 2GB. A buffer of 8192 is adequate for most purposes. It doesn't have to have anything to do with the socket receive buffer size either. You don't need any of the flush() calls and you only need to close 'out' and 'bis'. Too much unnecessary and wasteful code here. –  EJP Jul 4 at 14:55

Here is the server Open a stream to the file and send it overnetwork

import java.io.BufferedInputStream;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileInputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.OutputStream;
import java.net.ServerSocket;
import java.net.Socket;

public class SimpleFileServer {

  public final static int SOCKET_PORT = 5501;
  public final static String FILE_TO_SEND = "file.txt";

  public static void main (String [] args ) throws IOException {
    FileInputStream fis = null;
    BufferedInputStream bis = null;
    OutputStream os = null;
    ServerSocket servsock = null;
    Socket sock = null;
    try {
      servsock = new ServerSocket(SOCKET_PORT);
      while (true) {
        System.out.println("Waiting...");
        try {
          sock = servsock.accept();
          System.out.println("Accepted connection : " + sock);
          // send file
          File myFile = new File (FILE_TO_SEND);
          byte [] mybytearray  = new byte [(int)myFile.length()];
          fis = new FileInputStream(myFile);
          bis = new BufferedInputStream(fis);
          bis.read(mybytearray,0,mybytearray.length);
          os = sock.getOutputStream();
          System.out.println("Sending " + FILE_TO_SEND + "(" + mybytearray.length + " bytes)");
          os.write(mybytearray,0,mybytearray.length);
          os.flush();
          System.out.println("Done.");
        } catch (IOException ex) {
          System.out.println(ex.getMessage()+": An Inbound Connection Was Not Resolved");
        }
        }finally {
          if (bis != null) bis.close();
          if (os != null) os.close();
          if (sock!=null) sock.close();
        }
      }
    }
    finally {
      if (servsock != null)
        servsock.close();
    }
  }
}

Here is the client Recive the file being sent overnetwork

import java.io.BufferedOutputStream;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.net.Socket;

public class SimpleFileClient {

  public final static int SOCKET_PORT = 5501;
  public final static String SERVER = "127.0.0.1";
  public final static String
       FILE_TO_RECEIVED = "file-rec.txt";

  public final static int FILE_SIZE = Integer.MAX_VALUE;

  public static void main (String [] args ) throws IOException {
    int bytesRead;
    int current = 0;
    FileOutputStream fos = null;
    BufferedOutputStream bos = null;
    Socket sock = null;
    try {
      sock = new Socket(SERVER, SOCKET_PORT);
      System.out.println("Connecting...");

      // receive file
      byte [] mybytearray  = new byte [FILE_SIZE];
      InputStream is = sock.getInputStream();
      fos = new FileOutputStream(FILE_TO_RECEIVED);
      bos = new BufferedOutputStream(fos);
      bytesRead = is.read(mybytearray,0,mybytearray.length);
      current = bytesRead;

      do {
         bytesRead =
            is.read(mybytearray, current, (mybytearray.length-current));
         if(bytesRead >= 0) current += bytesRead;
      } while(bytesRead > -1);

      bos.write(mybytearray, 0 , current);
      bos.flush();
      System.out.println("File " + FILE_TO_RECEIVED
          + " downloaded (" + current + " bytes read)");
    }
    finally {
      if (fos != null) fos.close();
      if (bos != null) bos.close();
      if (sock != null) sock.close();
    }
  }    
}
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