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My professor, (for some unexplained reason) wants to change all input-output files of our gas-simulation (written in C++) to the XML file format from the plain-old .txt files that we have been using so far.

All I have been told is that XML file format is "good" and it helps to better "organize data". Googling about the adnavtages of XML throws up a huge pile of information on how it is used "data-bases" and "web-development" and other areas of which I have zero-knowledge and I am just not interested in.

To add to my frustration, all documentation about C++ XML parsers like Xerces, or RapidXML seem to be extremely poor on documentation. Whatever documentation is there uses lots of fancy XML lingo ("DOM?" "SAX?" "schema?") in their introductory examples.

Overall, just switching my input-output file format from .txt to "XML" seems to be a huge pain

So my questions are 3 fold.

  1. What are the real advantages of XML document format if I use it as my initial-settings / data file format?

  2. One example of an input and output file I typically use is

Pressure Temperature   Volume     Radius
    0.2       7.8        4.5     6.7
    0.5       4.5        7.8     8.9
    0.6       7.8        4.5     1.2
    0.7       4.5        8.9     2.3

Would there be any advantage in switching to XML here? How would I do that? The text file like the above usually has 50000 lines of numbers of which I have shown only 4. Are there advantages in speed at which XML files can be read / outputted as comopared to ASCII text-file format?

3 . Can someone tell me how to rewrite the above columnar data in XML file format? Also, if someone can give me a complete C++ code sample of how to parse this file and out the data into arrays pressure[N] 'temperature[N]' etc. that would be great.

I am aware that SO users frown upon helping out with code unless the OP makes some attempt of his own to code-out the problem. So for question 3 if someone can set me on the right track with useful newbie links that would be helpful so I can keep updating this post with my attempts at parsing a simple XML file containing colmnar data like the above using C++.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

I know it's difficult to understand it's advantages in the beggining, specially if you are working with little information or very small data sets. Sometimes parsing them manually seems like a better option indeed.

However, when working with moderated to large data sets, when data entries are connected or have some relationship with themselves it's best to describe them in XML. Why? It allows me to structure the data in a universal format that is largely used by the IT industry. There are several different techonologies (databases, programming libraries, etc) that allows me to store and quickly find the data I'm looking for.

Just an example, last week I was working in a project that (for some shady reason) needed to record a snapshot of the filesystem tree along with the md5 of the files. To achieve this, I decided to developed a small C++ application (using RapidXML) to retrieve the entire filesystem tree and record the md5 sum of each file in a XML.

That made it easier to describe the relationship between directories, subdirectories and files.

For instance, the following tree:

.
├── dir1
│   └── subdir1_1
│       └── subdir1_2
│           └── subfile1_2
├── dir2
│   └── subdir2_1
│       └── subfile2_1
├── dir3
│   └── subdir3_1
│       └── subdir3_2
│           └── subdir3_3
│               └── subdir3_4
│                   └── subfile3_4
├── nodeid

ended up being translated into this structure:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<directory name="dir1">
    <directory name="subdir1_1">
        <directory name="subdir1_2">
            <file name="subfile1_2" md5="d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e"/>
            <directory name="dir3">
                <directory name="subdir3_1">
                    <file name="subfile3_4" md5="d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e"/>
                </directory>
            </directory>
        </directory>
    </directory>
</directory>
<file name="nodeid" md5="045f8e15c66c91bcd503377c4b0bd565"/>
<directory name="dir2">
    <directory name="subdir2_1">
        <file name="subfile2_1" md5="d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e"/>
    </directory>
</directory>

Searching in a XML formatted file is better than non-formatted files because you don't have to read every single piece of data in the file to be able to find what you are looking for. Instead, you can jump over entire data sections and go straight ahead, providing a faster search mechanism.

Now, back to your problem. I would describe your data set in the following format: Pressure, Temperature, Volume and Radius seem to be properties that are connected somehow to describe a single element. So, group them together to describe the element:

<element Pressure="0.2" Temperature="7.8" Volume="4.5" Radius="6.7"/>
<element Pressure="0.5" Temperature="4.5" Volume="7.8" Radius="8.9"/>

and so on.

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+1 for the nice example – ma cılay Mar 1 '12 at 18:47

If you really want to take advantage you have to swallow the ugly frog and learn some new vocabulary. See the nice example of karlphillip

What are the real advantages of XML document format if I use it as my initial-settings / data file format?

XML offers the advantage if you define a schema for your xml file, you can check the input for correctness. You can define an XML Schema and say e.g. Pressure should always have the format 0.[0-9] or something like that. Your file gets easier to read for humans while being parseable for machines.

Would there be any advantage in switching to XML here? How would I do that? The text file like the above usually has 50000 lines of numbers of which I have shown only 4. Are there advantages in speed at which XML files can be read / outputted as comopared to ASCII text-file format?

Are the samples entered into the txt file automatically or by hand? for the latter case the advantage would be that there is no screw up when new data is added (like changing order or wrong format). Your XML could look like:

 <sample id="1">
     <pressure>0.2</pressure>
     <temperature>7.8</temperature>
     <volume>4.5</volume>
     <radius>6.7</radius>
 </sample>
 <sample id="2">....</sample>

or it could look like

<sample id="1" Pressure="0.2" Temperature="7.8" Volume="4.5" Radius="6.7"/>

I think speedwise the xml solution would be slower, because of the xml processing overhead, but you'd gain in usability of the format.

Point 3: I'm not a C++ programmer (not an experienced one at least), how about this link: http://www.applied-mathematics.net/tools/xmlParser.html (Seems the author felt some of the same pain you experienced, although beware: it seems to be a non-validating parser)

For converting you're old data into xml i'd first think about how i want to structure the xml file. Then i'd use perl/python/ruby/favoritescriptlanguage that would read in my old format and spit it out in xml.

Edit: Pro: Basically you get a format which is easily readable by humans and still parseable by machines. You can define a schema for your format (using XML Schema or DTD), so your format can be validated. You'll get tons of libraries and apps for working with xml. I think most developers would have no problem understanding the structure of a xml file in comparison to to a custom format (though your format is relatively simple).

Con: You'll have to learn new vocabulary. You'll have to convert old data into xml. You'll have to learn some libraries to read and write xml. Speedwise you'll lose some performance but I think most of the mature libraries are fast enough.

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+1 well explained! – karlphillip Mar 2 '12 at 3:20

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