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An integer measures 4 bytes. In my example I have numbers measuring 1 MB. How can I convert them to a human readable decimal number fast?

The number is present in uint[] Array containing Size items.

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7  
I'm not sure how human readable it can be if it's a number that takes 1 MB of storage... –  Lester Mar 1 '12 at 18:22
3  
What human would want to read a million digits? –  J... Mar 1 '12 at 18:22
3  
I think you'd be hard pressed to say a number that size would be human readable. Does it have to be exact, or would 10 significant digits X 10^huge exponent be sufficient? –  Kendrick Mar 1 '12 at 18:23
3  
Not sure why this is getting so many downvotes? The idea of displaying a 1 million digit number may sound ridiculous, but I don't know the scenario. The question itself looks good to me, although it's missing some information. Here's one thing I'd like to know: What does the array actually contain? If the number is already present as individual digits, this becomes simple string concatenation. If the number is a 1 million digit number in bits, split every 4 bytes and put in an array of uint, this is different. –  Michael Stum Mar 1 '12 at 23:07
4  
It's called a divide-and-conquer base conversion algorithm. The idea is to recursively use a radix roughly equal to half the size of the input size. So instead of dividing by 10 each time. You divide by say, 10^100000 and you recursively continue until all the sub-conversions reduce to something trivial. To achieve sub-quadratic performance, you need sub-quadratic multiplication. To achieve O(n * log(n)^2), you need FFT-based multiplication. So it's non-trivial. –  Mysticial Mar 2 '12 at 21:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't know if this is any faster, but here is an example in delphi I wrote a long time ago to handle big ints as strings (VERY quick and dirty) - this was for 128bit uint but you could extend it indefinitely

Function HexToBinShort(hex:integer):string;
begin
  case hex of
    0:  result:='0000';  //convert each hex digit to binary string
    1:  result:='0001';  //could do this with high-nybble and low nybble
    2:  result:='0010';  //of each sequential byte in the array (mask and bit shift)
    3:  result:='0011';  //ie: binstring:=binstring + HexToBinShort(nybble[i])
    4:  result:='0100';  //but must count DOWN for i (start with MSB!)
    5:  result:='0101';
    6:  result:='0110';
    7:  result:='0111';
    8:  result:='1000';
    9:  result:='1001';
    10: result:='1010';
    11: result:='1011';
    12: result:='1100';
    13: result:='1101';
    14: result:='1110';
    15: result:='1111';
  end;
end;

Then take the concatenated binary string and add powers of two each time you see a '1'

Function BinToIntString(binstring:string):string;
var i, j : integer;
var calcHold, calc2 :string;
begin
  calc2:=binstring[Length(binstring)];   // first bit is easy 0 or 1
  for i := (Length(binstring) - 1) downto 1 do begin       
    if binstring[i] = '1' then begin   
       calcHold:=generateCard(Length(binstring)-i);
       calc2 := AddDecimalStrings(calcHold, calc2);
    end;
  end;
  result:=calc2;
end;

generateCard is used to create a decimal string representation of 2^i (for i>0)

Function generateCard(i:integer):string;
var j : integer;
var outVal : string;
begin
  outVal := '2';
  if i > 1 then begin
    for j := 2 to i do begin
      outVal:= MulByTwo(outVal);
    end;
  end;
  result := outVal;
end;

and MulByTwo multiplies a decimal string by two

Function MulByTwo(val:string):string;
var i : integer;
var carry, hold : integer;
var outHold : string;
var outString :string;
var outString2 : string;
begin
  outString:= StringOfChar('0', Length(val) + 1);
  outString2:= StringOfChar('0', Length(val));
  carry :=0;
  for i := Length(val) downto 1 do begin
    hold := StrToInt(val[i]) * 2 + carry;
    if hold >= 10 then begin
      carry := 1;
      hold := hold - 10;
    end else begin
      carry := 0;
    end;
    outHold := IntToStr(hold);
    outString[i+1] := outHold[1];
  end;
  if carry = 1 then begin
    outString[1] := '1';
    result := outString;
  end else begin
    for i := 1 to length(outString2) do outString2[i]:=outString[i+1];
    result := outString2;
  end;
end; 

And finally - AddDecimalStrings...well, it adds two decimal strings :

Function AddDecimalStrings(val1, val2:string):string;
var i,j :integer;
var carry, hold, largest: integer;
var outString, outString2, bigVal, smVal, outHold:string;
begin
  if Length(val1) > Length(val2) then begin
    largest:= Length(val1);
    bigVal := val1;
    smVal := StringOfChar('0', largest);
    j:=1;
    for i := (largest - length(val2) +1) to largest do begin
      smVal[i] := val2[j];
      j:=j+1;
    end;
  end else begin
    if length(val2) > Length(val1) then begin
      largest:=Length(val2);
      bigVal:=val2;
      smVal := StringOfChar('0', largest);
      j:=1;
      for i := (largest - length(val1) +1) to largest do begin
        smVal[i] := val1[j];
        j:=j+1;
      end;
    end else begin
      largest:=length(val1);
      bigVal:=val1;
      smVal:=val2;
    end;
  end;
  carry:=0;
  outString:=StringOfChar('0', largest +1);
  outString2:=StringOfChar('0', largest);

  for i := largest downto 1 do begin
    hold := StrToInt(bigVal[i]) + StrToInt(smVal[i]) + carry;
    if hold >=10 then begin
      carry:=1;
      hold := hold - 10;
    end else begin
      carry:=0;
    end;
    outHold:= IntToStr(hold);
    outString[i+1]:=outHold[1];
  end;

  if carry = 1 then begin
    outString[1] := '1';
    result := outString;
  end else begin
    for i := 1 to length(outString2) do outString2[i]:=outString[i+1];
    result := outString2;
  end;  
end;

These functions allow you to perform basic arithmetic on almost arbitrarily large integers as strings. You hit another wall when the number of digits is too big to index an array with, of course.

Here's a divide by two, btw (useful for going the other way...). I don't handle odd numbers here.

Function DivByTwo(val:string):string;
var i : integer;
var hold : integer;
var outHold : string;
var outString, outString2 :string;
begin
  outString:=StringOfChar('0',Length(val));

  for i := Length(val) downto 1 do begin
    if StrToInt(val[i]) mod 2 = 0 then begin
      hold:= Math.Floor(StrToInt(val[i]) / 2);
      outHold:= IntToStr(hold);
      outString[i]:=outHold[1];
    end else begin
      hold:= Math.Floor((StrToInt(val[i]) - 1) / 2);
      outHold:=IntToStr(hold);
      outString[i]:= outHold[1];
      if i <> Length(val) then begin
        hold:= StrToInt(outString[i+1]) + 5;
        outHold:= IntToStr(hold);
        outString[i+1] := outHold[1];
      end;
    end;
  end;
  outString2:=StringOfChar('0',Length(val)-1);
  if (outString[1] = '0') and (length(outString) > 1) then begin
    for i := 1 to length(outString2) do outString2[i]:=outString[i+1];
    result:=outString2;
  end else begin
    result:=outString;
  end;
end;

EDIT: I just tried this with a 9million bit long binary string and it is ludicrously slow! Not surprising, really. This is completely unoptimized code which has a lot of low hanging fruit to pick at for speeding things up. Still, I can't help but feel that this is the kind (or scale) of problem that you would probably want to write, at least partially, in fully optimized assembly. The individual operations are small but they must be done many times - that spells begging for assembly. Multithreading could certainly be leveraged here too.

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This is faster than my attempt. I implemented it (the idea, not copy&paste) and it's a lot faster, but when handling a milion decimal digits and multiply it by two - a milion times, it will also be slow. But for now it is the best way to go for. But I'm still open for ideas :) –  Devils Child Mar 2 '12 at 10:35
    
If you don't want to resort to assembly you could speed this up by doing all of the "generateCard" calls first in ascending order - assuming you have enough RAM to keep it all in memory you could re-use each one for the next calculation (or store them somewhere). I hit about 1GB of memory usage at about 50kbits - you'd probably need 20-30GB of system memory to make this work. I think there's probably a better way... Mystical's assertion of an n*log(n)^2 solution is intriguing. –  J... Mar 2 '12 at 13:32

I've been thinking about your problem. I don't have a solution coded up, but here is an approach:

First off, let's assume without loss of generality that you have a collection of 2n bits. (If you have fewer than exactly 2n bits, pad out the bit array with leading zeros until you do. Obviously doing so never more than doubles the size of the array.) In your case you say you have a million uints, so that's 225 bits.

Let's also assume that every collection of 2k + 1 bits can be split evenly into two collections of bits, the left and right collections, each with 2k bits.

Thus every bit collection, or sub-collection, has a "size" which is an exact power of two. The smallest possible collection contains a single bit and cannot be further subdivided.

Second, let's assume that you similarly have an immutable representation of a number in decimal form, and that again, without loss of generality, there are 2d decimal digits in the string. If there are fewer than exactly 2d, again, pad with leading zeros. Again, each decimal collection of size greater than one can be split into two collections each half the size.

Now we sketch out a recursive algorithm:

DigitCollection Convert(BitCollection bits)
{
    if (bits.Size == 1)
        return bits[0] ? DigitCollection.SingleOne : DigitCollection.SingleZero;
    DigitCollection left = Convert(bits.Left);        
    DigitCollection right = Convert(bits.Right);
    DigitCollection power = MakePowerOfTwo(bits.Right.Size);
    return Add(Multiply(left, power), right);
}

We now need methods Add, Multiply and MakePowerOfTwo. As we'll see in a moment, we'll also need Subtract, and two Shift operators, for rapidly multiplying by powers of ten.

Addition and subtraction are easy. Clearly if the longer collection contains n digits then addition and subtraction methods can be implemented to take O(n) time.

FullShift and HalfShift operators make new digit collections out of old ones to facilitate rapid multiplication by powers of ten. If a digit collection of size 2d+1 consists of sub-collections (X1, X2) each of size 2d then the "half-shifted" collection contains 2d+2 items and consists of ( (2d leading zeros, X1), (X2, 2d trailing zeros)). The full-shift collection consists of ((X1, X2), (2d+1 trailing zeros)).

These are obviously very cheap to construct.

Multiplication is where we run into big problems. Suppose without loss of generality that we are multiplying together two DigitCollections each with exactly 2d digits. We can use Karatsuba's Algorithm:

DigitCollection Multiply(DigitCollection x, DigitCollection y)
{
    // Assume x and y are the same digit size.
    if (x and y are both single digits)
        return the trivial solution;
    // Assume that z2, z1 and z0 are all the same digit size as x and y.
    DigitCollection z2 = Multiply(x.Left, y.Left);
    DigitCollection z0 = Multiply(x.Right, y.Right);
    DigitCollection z1 = Subtract(
        Multiply(Add(x.Left, x.Right), Add(y.Left, y.Right)),
        Add(z2, z0));
    return Add(Add(FullShift(z2), HalfShift(z1)), z0);
}

What is the order of this algorithm? Suppose there are n = 2d digits. What is O(Multiply(n))? We recurse three times, each with a problem with half as many digits. The rest of the add, subtract and shift operations are each no more than O(n). So we have a recurrance:

T(n) = 3 T(n/2) + O(n)

Which has an easy solution via the Master Theorem: this algorithm is O(n1/lg 3) which is about O(n1.58).

What about MakePowerOfTwo? That's easy given what we already have. We use the identity:

22n + 1 = 2n x 2n + 2n x 2n

and write the algorithm:

DigitCollection MakePowerOfTwo(int p)
{
    if (p == 0) return DigitCollection.SingleOne;
    DigitCollection power = MakePowerOfTwo(p / 2);
    power = Multiply(power, power);
    if (p % 2 != 0)
        power = Add(power, power);
    return power;
}

It is dominated by the computation of the multiplication, and so is O(n1.58) as well.

And now we can see that the original call to Convert is also dominated by the multiplication.

So with this algorithm if you have 2d binary digits to convert, you can expect it will take about O(21.58 d) steps to do so. In your case you have 225 bits to convert, so that should take about 777 billion calculations.

The key fact here is that this algorithm is utterly dominated by the cost of the multiplication. If you can reduce the cost of the multiplication to less than O(n1.58) then you get huge wins. If I were you I would be studying improvements to decimal multiplication algorithms over Karatsuba.

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1  
Taken to the extreme, this is the O(n * log(n)^2) divide-and-conquer conversion algorithm implemented by the GMP C library. GMP uses a near O(n * log(n)) FFT-based multiplication algorithm. I know Java's BigInteger lacks sub-quadratic multiplication. Just curious: Does C#'s BigInteger have sub-quadratic multiplication? Does it have O(n * log(n)) multiplication? –  Mysticial Mar 2 '12 at 21:45
    
@Mysticial: I do not know! It would be interesting to find out. –  Eric Lippert Mar 2 '12 at 21:49

You might be able to save some time by doing more than one digit at a time. if you do it, say, 100,000 at a time, it'll likely go at least a little faster than 10 at a time.

Mind you, it's still likely to be pretty painfully slow, but it'll save you some time.

It's conceivable that you could make it recursive, and speed it up that much more - get the rough square root of the number, rounded down to the nearest exponent of 10. div and mod by that number, and send the results back to the same function. Mind you, I'm not sure how you'd go about efficiently running a div or mod of that size, but if you can figure it out (and don't run out of memory) it's still bound to be more time-efficient than dividing it out a digit at a time.

Alternate version: give up on decimals - since the number's going to be way too large to make sense to any actual human readers anyway - and render the thing in hex. Still technically human-readable, but you can render it a byte at a time and save yourself a whole lot of heartache.

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2  
Doing a lot of them at once will likely save some time, yes. Recursion will quite likely cause a stack overflow. –  Zéychin Mar 1 '12 at 22:31

Thanks to you all, I figured out a way mainly based upon the idea of J..., who suggested converting the number to 10 based numbers by adding up the power of 2 each time there is a 1. But instead of a 10 based (human decimal system) I use a 1000000000000000000 (10^18) based system. So each digit has not only 10 posibilities (0...9), but actually 10^18! This fits into a 64bit number which we then convert .ToString()

It is the most efficient way yet.

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