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I have a quick question regarding candidate keys and superkeys. Say you have two keys (a, b) where 'a' is a primary key and b is a candidate key. Would the combination of these two keys be a superkey ie. would (a,b) be a superkey? Or would it be a candidate key. My assumption is that it would be a superkey because the definition of a candidate key states that it is a irreducible superkey and the combination of the two fields a and b could be reduced to either a or b. Is this logic correct? Or am I missing something here? Thanks!

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Because a and b are keys, a + some attribute or b + some attribute are a superkeys. Then a + b is also superkey. – danihp Mar 1 '12 at 18:29
    
But the superkey itself would not be considered a candidate key because its not minimal, correct? – Ben Nelson Mar 1 '12 at 18:34
    
@BenNelson Candidate keys are always superkeys, not vice versa. – JNK Mar 1 '12 at 18:45
    
Cool, thank you for clarifying that!!! – Ben Nelson Mar 1 '12 at 18:50
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Would the combination of these two keys be a superkey ie. would (a,b) be a superkey?

Yes, it would still uniquely identify rows.

Or would it be a candidate key.

No, it would no longer be minimal.

My assumption is that it would be a superkey because the definition of a candidate key states that it is a irreducible superkey and the combination of the two fields a and b could be reduced to either a or b. Is this logic correct?

Almost. Yes it would be a superkey, but not because it can be reduced. It would be a superkey because it is unique.

Every candidate key is superkey, but not every superkey is candidate key. So {a} is both candidate and superkey, {b} is both candidate and superkey and {a, b} is just superkey.

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