Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

When I execute the following code in Chrome 18 beta I get the error:

console.log.apply(this, ['message']);

TypeError: Illegal invocation.

In Firefox 10 it works as expected.

In IE9 I get the error: Object doesn't support property or method 'apply'.

I'm guessing this has to do with how the browser has implemented console.log.

Why does it work in Firefox but not in Chrome and IE? I'm hoping someone can shed some light on the cause of this and its ramifications.

Here is an executable sample on JS Bin.

share|improve this question
add comment

marked as duplicate by casperOne Mar 13 '13 at 14:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers

up vote 38 down vote accepted

console and log are host objects. Their behavior is implementation dependent, and to a large degree are not required to implement the semantics of ECMAScript.

FWIW, your jsBin fails in Chrome as well unless you change it to...

console.log.apply(console, ['message']);

but that seems to be that log simply anticipates a calling context of console.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Here's an alternate solution. I'm not sure the case where there are no args works as expected.

function logr(){
    var i = -1, l = arguments.length, args = [], fn = 'console.log(args)';
    while(++i<l){
        args.push('args['+i+']');
    };
    fn = new Function('args',fn.replace(/args/,args.join(',')));
    fn(arguments);
};
logr(1,2,3);
logr();
logr({},this,'done')
share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.