Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Ok, so I am trying to pass a pointer rgb that is initialized with memset to 0 and then looped through to place a 32 bit integer only in the bounds that I create with height and width input (h and w) as well as offset from the top left corner of the 2d array (x and y). after compiling, I seem to have the value with printf of the pointer just after it was made which gives the correct value (in my case 0xFFFFFF with and input of 255 255 255 for r g b) but after it is passed through to rgb2yuv function, it is set to 0 when I printf there.

Any suggestions would be awesome!

#include <stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<unistd.h>
#include<fcntl.h>
#include<errno.h>
#include<string.h>

/*global definitions*/
#define WIDTH 480
#define HEIGHT 240

/*global declarations*/
int w,h,scrn, bytewrite;
unsigned char  red, green, blue;
static unsigned long rgb[WIDTH][HEIGHT];


/*function declarations*/
void colorq();
void rgb_rectdraw(int x, int y, int w, int h, unsigned char red , 
    unsigned char green, unsigned char blue, unsigned long *rgb);
void rgb2yuv(unsigned long *rgb);


/*
   Function Name: main
   Purpose: main function
*/

int main(int argc, char** argv) 
 {
printf("\n");
int x, y;


/*call colorq to create a 32bit number of RGB*/
colorq();


/ *call rgb_rectdraw to draw a rectangle RGB array*/
rgb_rectdraw(x, y, w, h, red, green, blue, rgb);

/*call rgb2yuv to take the RGB array and covert it to a YUV array*/
rgb2yuv(rgb);

return 0;
 }

/*
  Funtion name: color q
  Purpose: asks user to input colors from 0 to 255 in RGB format
*/

void colorq(){

printf("Please enter a color for Red Green and Blue from 0 to 255:\n");
scanf("%hu", &red);
scanf("%hu", &green);
scanf("%hu", &blue);
printf("\n");

return;
}



/*
   Function name: rectdraw
   Purpose: Draws a rectangle array
*/

void rgb_rectdraw(int x, int y, int w, int h,unsigned char red, 
    unsigned char green,  unsigned char blue,unsigned long  *rgb)
{
unsigned long rgbpixel;

/* testing only take out when 
   finished debugging why red is always 0 after scanf */
red = 255;
printf("red set to 255 for debugging\n");

/*creates a 32-bit number of RGB*/
rgbpixel = (red<<16)|(green<<8)|blue;
printf("%#x\n",rgbpixel);

/*create array of width w height h*/ 
/*initialize array*/

memset (rgb, 0,sizeof(HEIGHT*WIDTH));
int i, j, startx, stopx, starty, stopy;


printf("enter width and height of rectangle in pixels\n");
scanf("%d %d", &w, &h);

printf("enter offset x pixels and y pixels of rectangle:\n");
scanf("%d %d", &x, &y);

startx=x;
starty=y;
stopx=x+w;
stopy=y+w;

/* creates array of w and h of int rgh */ 
for(i=startx; i <= stopx; i++){
   for(j=starty; j <= stopy; j++){
      rgb = rgbpixel;
      }
   j = 0;
   }
printf("original rgb %#x\n",rgb);
return ;
}

/*
 *Function Name: rgb2yuv
 *Purpose: convert the RGB array to a YUV array
 */

void rgb2yuv(unsigned long  *rgb){

int i,j;
printf("ptrpassed = %#x\n",*rgb);
for(i=0; i<=WIDTH;i++){
   for(j=0; j<=HEIGHT; j++){
   }
}
printf("\n");
return;
}
share|improve this question
    
Code formatting is messed up –  Nikolai N Fetissov Jun 4 '09 at 18:11
    
Will someone please reformat the question? –  kbyrd Jun 4 '09 at 18:11
    
It's so painful to read this code! Could you please edit it and paste the code as Code Sample. Cheers. –  Artur Jun 4 '09 at 18:12
1  
@bryce: Stop editing this. I've fixed it 5 times. –  Eric Jun 4 '09 at 18:19
    
sorry about that, new to the site and not used to posting code on here. thanks! –  bryce Jun 4 '09 at 18:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I went through and basically sorted out all the warts, and explained why. A lot of it amounts to the fact that if your compiler spits out warnings, you have to listen to them.

/* Changed: Code formatted for my sanity */

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>

/*global definitions*/
#define WIDTH 480
#define HEIGHT 240

/*global declarations*/
int w,h,scrn, bytewrite;
/* Changed: to a short because I don't like the fact that I might be overwriting
   memory on accident (in colorq). */
unsigned short red, green, blue;
static unsigned long rgb[WIDTH][HEIGHT];

/* Changed: Some format strings have been changed to get rid of compiler
   warnings. */

/*function declarations*/
void colorq();
/* Changed: Specify the second dimension when you're passing an array. */
void rgb_rectdraw(int x, int y, int w, int h, unsigned char red,
                  unsigned char green, unsigned char blue,
                  unsigned long rgb[][HEIGHT]);
/* Changed: always pass an array of arrays. */
void rgb2yuv(unsigned long rgb[][HEIGHT]);


/*
   Function Name: main
   Purpose: main function
 */

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    printf("\n");
    int x, y;


    /*call colorq to create a 32bit number of RGB*/
    colorq();


    /* call rgb_rectdraw to draw a rectangle RGB array */
    rgb_rectdraw(x, y, w, h, red, green, blue, rgb);

    /* call rgb2yuv to take the RGB array and covert it to a YUV array */
    rgb2yuv(rgb);

    return 0;
}

/*
   Funtion name: color q
   Purpose: asks user to input colors from 0 to 255 in RGB format
 */

void colorq(){
    /* Suggestion: restructure this method to just take in all its input
       locally, then return a rgbpixel. */

    printf("Please enter a color for Red Green and Blue from 0 to 255:\n");
    scanf("%hu", &red);
    scanf("%hu", &green);
    scanf("%hu", &blue);
    printf("\n");

    return;
}



/*
   Function name: rectdraw
   Purpose: Draws a rectangle array
 */

void rgb_rectdraw(int x, int y, int w, int h,unsigned char red,
                  unsigned char green, unsigned char blue,
                  unsigned long rgb[][HEIGHT])
{
    unsigned long rgbpixel;

    /* testing only take out when
       finished debugging why red is always 0 after scanf */
    red = 255;
    printf("red set to 255 for debugging\n");

    /*creates a 32-bit number of RGB*/
    /* Changed: Added the extra 0xFF masking because of shortness rather than
       charness. */
    rgbpixel = ((red & 0xFF) << 16) | ((green & 0xFF) << 8) | (blue & 0xFF);
    printf("%#lx\n",rgbpixel);

    /*create array of width w height h*/
    /*initialize array*/

    /* Changed: fill the size of one element times the number of elements */
    memset(rgb, 0, sizeof(unsigned long) * HEIGHT * WIDTH);
    int i, j, startx, stopx, starty, stopy;


    printf("enter width and height of rectangle in pixels\n");
    scanf("%d %d", &w, &h);

    printf("enter offset x pixels and y pixels of rectangle:\n");
    scanf("%d %d", &x, &y);

    startx=x;
    starty=y;
    stopx=x+w;
    stopy=y+w;

    /* creates array of w and h of int rgh */
    for(i=startx; i <= stopx; i++){
        for(j=starty; j <= stopy; j++){
            rgb[i][j] = rgbpixel;
        }
        j = 0;
    }
    printf("original rgb %#lx\n", (long unsigned int) rgb);
    return ;
}

/*
 *Function Name: rgb2yuv
 *Purpose: convert the RGB array to a YUV array
 */

void rgb2yuv(unsigned long  rgb[][HEIGHT]){

    int i,j;
    /* Changed: You can't just dereference rgb twice -- you have to use array
       notation here. */
    printf("ptrpassed = %#lx\n", rgb[0][0]);
    for(i=0; i<=WIDTH; i++){
        for(j=0; j<=HEIGHT; j++){
        }
    }
    printf("\n");
    return;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Paul and everyone who helped! –  bryce Jun 5 '09 at 12:57
    
@Paul: Wow, you've got a lot of time on your hands. I need my garage painted if your looking for some non-code related work ... –  Jamie Jun 9 '09 at 17:38

This actually has a number of bugs, but your first issue is assigning the pixel value to the array:

   for(i=startx; i <= stopx; i++){
   for(j=starty; j <= stopy; j++){
      rgb = rgbpixel;
      }
   j = 0;
   }

You probably meant something like this:

rgb[i][j] = rgbpixel;

You don't need to reset j to 0 -- the inner for-loop will immediately reset j to starty anyhow.

Also, you're misusing sizeof(). You probably want sizeof(rgb) instead.

share|improve this answer

Why not use a structure? If the code has no intention of being portable you could easily get away with:

struct rgb_bits {
    int red   : 8;
    int green : 8;
    int blue  : 8;
};
union rgb {
    rgb_bits colour;
    long     array;
}

Blanking out the pixel then simply becomes:

union rgb pixel;
pixel.array = 0;

and setting individual colours becomes:

union rgb pixel;
pixel.colour.red   = ...;
pixel.colour.green = ...;
pixel.colour.blue  = ...;
share|improve this answer

Looks like you're storing your single pixel value in the pointer to your data to me:

rgb = rgbpixel;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.