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I'm trying to show multiple images in a component's tooltip, found createToolTip() and implemented a custom that adds the needed components like this:

setComponent(component);

JPanel images = new JPanel(null);
images.setLayout(new BoxLayout(images, BoxLayout.X_AXIS));
for(ImageIcon icon:myIcons) {
    images.add(new JLabel(icon));
}

JPanel content = new JPanel(new BorderLayout());
content.add(new JLabel(title), BorderLayout.NORTH);
content.add(new JLabel(description));
content.add(images, BorderLayout.SOUTH);

add(content);

However, all I see is a little dot, indicating that the tool tip is shown, but somehow the size is ignored. What do I miss implementing a custom tooltip?

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I'm posting this question after having it solved myself. I'm not sure how good or bad manner it is to post in such a situation, but since neither The Java Tutorial nor Stack Overflow currently explains this, I wanted to share my results. Whether this is good or bad of me, I'd be happy to be politely taught better ;) –  Silly Freak Mar 1 '12 at 19:18
2  
nice question with great track-down :-) Just some link-dropping which might be interesting: forums.oracle.com/forums/thread.jspa?threadID=2128796 - see my last comment as to why the ui delegate ignores the LayoutManager –  kleopatra Mar 2 '12 at 11:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The base "problems" are that JToolTip

  • is-not designed as a container, it's only accidentally a container because JComponent is. For a Swing "not-container" it's the responsibility of the ui-delegate to act as LayoutManager.
  • isn't rich enough, it can handle text-only (at least with the emergency door html, which is @Andrew's favourite :-)

By-passing those limitations basically is a driving that widget nearly over the edge. A clean solution would roll a new component .. On the other hand, the OP already found the screws to tweak. The only thingy that could be slightly improved is to neither call setXXSize, nor set a custom ui. Instead, make it behave like a container by overriding getXXSize() like:

@Override
public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
    if (getLayout() != null) {
        return getLayout().preferredLayoutSize(this);
    }
    return super.getPreferredSize();
}
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2  
Great! I added !isPreferredSizeSet() to the condition and are now using this variant! –  Silly Freak Mar 2 '12 at 19:48
    
And I see how the JToolTip is not really designed to do this, but don't quite understand why. As I see it, tooltips explain a component, but can even provide additional Info: I can see from the toolbar icon that the button print the document, but the tooltip additionally tells me that the acellerator is Ctrl+P. Facing that the tooltip may legitimately enhance a component's meaning, limiting it to text is surely historical? (Just wanted to get that out, no need to discuss a "philosophic" question here ;)) –  Silly Freak Mar 2 '12 at 19:55
    
+1, this answer took me back to Swing Tutorials, seems like I missed too much, by reading this answer :-) –  nIcE cOw Mar 5 '12 at 17:32

Tool tips can render HTML. If you can form URLs to the images (not practical if they are generated in memory but usually doable otherwise), it is an easy matter to write some HTML that will load the images, and use that HTML as the tool tip.


E.G.

MultiIconToolTip

import javax.swing.*;

class MultiIconToolTip {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        final String html =
            "<html><body>" +
            "<img src='" +
            "http://i.stack.imgur.com/OVOg3.jpg" +
            "' width=160 height=120> " +
            "<img src='" +
            "http://i.stack.imgur.com/lxthA.jpg" +
            "' width=160 height=120>" +
            "<p>Look Ma, no hands!";
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater( new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                JLabel hover = new JLabel("Point at me!");
                hover.setToolTipText(html);
                JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, hover);
            }
        });
    }
}
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This is a good idea! I haven't tried it, but I guess it should work with URLs from ClassLoader.getResource(), too –  Silly Freak Mar 1 '12 at 20:41
    
Yes, URLs pointing to the class-path work just fine. In fact, better than reaching out to my site, since the pop-up appears faster. –  Andrew Thompson Mar 2 '12 at 5:38

It might sound silly but, have you tried setting bounds for JPanel ?

setBounds(100, 100, 150, 50);

And you can try setting a gap between components in BorderLayout

JPanel content = new JPanel(new BorderLayout(1,1));
share|improve this answer
    
sorta; see my upcoming answer in a few minutes ;) unfortunately, there are some caveats that make custom tooltips strange to implement, even with swing experience –  Silly Freak Mar 1 '12 at 19:23
    
@SillyFreak Well, it's Swing. You can expect anything anytime. –  Cengiz Can Mar 1 '12 at 19:24
1  
+1 this could be right direction, not silly –  mKorbel Mar 1 '12 at 19:31
    
OK, turns out I can't answer my question within eight hours. I have added it to the question for now and will convert it into an answer tomorrow, then –  Silly Freak Mar 1 '12 at 19:37

I'd suggest to using JWindow or un_decorated JDialog, as popup window (used by default for JCalendar or JDatePicker) rather than JTooltip, for nicer output to the GUI implements Translucent and Shaped Windows

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There are essentially two things missing. First of all, JToolTip extends JComponent, and unlike JPanel, it doesn't have a default layout. To stretch the content across the tooltip, use a BorderLayout.

setLayout(new BorderLayout());

The second problem is the size. The ToolTipManager respects the preferred size of the tool tip. While the BorderLayout calculates the size, the ToolTipUI ignores it. So, there are two alternatives: Manually set the preferred size...

setPreferredSize(content.getPreferredSize());

Note that this does not make the layout obsolete; otherwise, you get an empty tool tip with the right size.

... or subclass ToolTipUI to respect the layout, which is what I went with. The resulting code is:

setComponent(StadtLabel.this);

JPanel images = new JPanel(null);
waren.setLayout(new BoxLayout(waren, BoxLayout.X_AXIS));
for(ImageIcon icon:myIcons) {
    JLabel lbl = new JLabel(icon);
}

JPanel content = new JPanel(new BorderLayout());
content.add(new JLabel(title), BorderLayout.NORTH);
content.add(new JLabel(description));
content.add(images, BorderLayout.SOUTH);

setLayout(new BorderLayout());
add(content);
setUI(new ToolTipUI() {
    @Override
    public Dimension getMinimumSize(JComponent c) {
        return c.getLayout().minimumLayoutSize(c);
    }

    @Override
    public Dimension getPreferredSize(JComponent c) {
        return c.getLayout().preferredLayoutSize(c);
    }

    @Override
    public Dimension getMaximumSize(JComponent c) {
        return getPreferredSize(c);
    }
});
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