Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on a debugging/logging program and was wondering if it would be possible to create a macro that I can paste inside each function and it will print the function name and parameter values each time the function's called. Function name can be resovled at compile time, the problem is figuring out how to print parameter values?

UPDATE: I remember reading an article to get parameters but that invovled assembly code and working manipulating stack pointers, which is not cross-platform compatible - something that I need.

share|improve this question
2  
C or C++? Different languages. –  Puppy Mar 1 '12 at 19:51
    
but macros should be the same for both, I selected both to broaden the audience –  tunafish24 Mar 1 '12 at 19:53

4 Answers 4

You can use the __FUNCTION__ or __func__ macro for the function name. For the parameters, I don't think there's a built-in macro to achieve this.

Other helpful macros are __LINE__ and __FILE__.

EDIT:

__FUNCTION__ and __func__ are not part of the standard, but they are widely supported.

16.8 deals with predefined macros:

__cplusplus
__DATE__
__FILE__
__LINE__
__STDC_HOSTED__
__TIME__

and macros defined by the implementation:

__STDC__
__STDC_VERSION__
__STDC_ISO_10646__
share|improve this answer
    
__func__ is part of the standard, but it is not a macro. Perhaps that is why you didn't find it at that place. –  Jens Gustedt Mar 1 '12 at 20:24
    
@JensGustedt we talking about the c++ standard? –  Luchian Grigore Mar 1 '12 at 20:27
    
no I was talking about C. In C11 it is 6.4.2.2, a predefined identifier, not a macro. AFAIR it was already in C99, so it should be in C++, too. –  Jens Gustedt Mar 1 '12 at 20:41
    
@JensGustedt it's not in C++. I don't know if C++11 has it, but before that, no. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 1 '12 at 20:47
    
The questioner stated they already knew how to get the function name from a macro -- the stated question was how to use a macro to retrieve na print the function parameters. –  Perry Mar 1 '12 at 20:48

For the function name, you can use the standard (since C99) identifier __func__.

In C++, the GNU extension identifier __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ will also print the parameter types.

share|improve this answer
    
The questioner stated he knew how to get the function name from a macro -- his concern was printing the function parameters. –  Perry Mar 1 '12 at 20:47

There is no portable way to get all the parameter values and print them -- you certainly can't do it from a macro. You may have to use another method to achieve what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
what's the other method? I could certainly use a macro to substitute C code. –  tunafish24 Mar 1 '12 at 19:59
    
You could do something ugly in which you did all your function declarations using a macro that blatted out code for the function declaration and then printed out their values at the head of the function itself. This is not pretty -- I wouldn't go down that path. That way lies madness. In the real world, just use gdb, or print what you need when you need it. –  Perry Mar 1 '12 at 20:06
    
@Perry how would you go about doing that? +1 from me if you can provide a working example. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 1 '12 at 20:13
    
It would be really grotesque. The way you would approach it would be to abuse the varadic macro facility and a multi-line macro. I am sure that getting it right (which means dealing properly with the types of the outputs) is going to be a bitch if it can be done with generality at all -- this is worth more than just a +1, this would be a potential contribution to the Obfuscated C Programming contest. (The similar hacks I've seen in the past, for example for a lisp interpreter in C, could depend on all parameters being one type.) –  Perry Mar 1 '12 at 21:00

Here are some examples and tricks with debugging with macroses. Lists of MS specific and GNU's

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.