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I’m getting some interesting behaviour in SQL Server 2012 when using the RANGE option with window aggregate functions, and am not sure if this is a bug or a ‘feature’ of SQL Server 2012. I have a table defined as follows:

CREATE TABLE [Test].[Trades](
    [ID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [Member] [varchar](20) NOT NULL,
    [TradeDate] [date] NOT NULL,
    [Fund] [varchar](4) NOT NULL,
    [Units] [decimal](28, 8) NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
    (
        [ID] ASC
    )
);

This table stores the trades that a member makes in a fund on a particular trade date. A member is able to make >1 trade in a given fund on a given date. In addition to the clustered index I have a non-clustered index defined as follows:

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [Ix_TradesIndex] ON [Test].[Trades]
(
    [Member] ASC,
    [Fund] ASC,
    [TradeDate] ASC
)
INCLUDE ([Units]);

If I wish to query the data set to give me the running total of units that each member has in each fund then using the extensions to the window aggregates in SQL Server 2012 I can answer the question as follows:

SELECT T.Member, T.Fund, T.TradeDate, 
SUM(T.Units) OVER(PARTITION BY T.Member, T.Fund
            ORDER BY T.TradeDate
            RANGE BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING 
            AND CURRENT ROW) AS TotalShares
FROM Test.Trades AS T;

This will give me a data set similar to below (example shows a member who made >1 trade in Fund2 on 2005-02-03):

....

Member1, Fund1, 2005-03-31, 0.00

Member1, Fund2, 2005-02-03, 3256.50

Member1, Fund2, 2005-02-03, 3256.50

....

The RANGE option has ensured that where the ordering clause is not unique (i.e. a given member has made more than one trade in a given fund on a particular trade date) that the window is includes all duplicate rows at the top of the range. This is working correctly as expected. However, if I wish to say ‘now give me only the distinct rows from this set’ (i.e. get rid of the duplicate entries) one way to ask this question is as follows:

SELECT DISTINCT T.Member, T.Fund, T.TradeDate, T.TotalShares
FROM
(
    SELECT T.Member, T.Fund, T.TradeDate, 
        SUM(T.Units) OVER(PARTITION BY T.Member, T.Fund
                ORDER BY T.TradeDate
                RANGE BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING 
                AND CURRENT ROW) AS TotalShares
    FROM Test.Trades AS T 
) AS T;

Here things get interesting: what I am seeing is that with large data sets if the plan goes parallel then the resulting set is non-deterministic (i.e. the query gives the wrong answer and the number of rows that the query returns can change on subsequent runs of the query). If the plan does not go parallel (which I can obviously force by specifying OPTION(MAXDOP 1)) then the query always returns the same number of rows, and the result set if the ‘correct’ result set. To me this feels like a bug in SQL Server 2012.

My question is ‘does anyone have an alternative explanation for this behaviour, or is this a bug?

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The Connect item has been updated to reflect that this bug has been fixed for SQL Server 2012 Cumulative Update 2 (which should publish in <= 60 days): connect.microsoft.com/SQLServer/feedback/details/728932/… –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 30 '12 at 22:11
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

So RANGE uses an on-disk work table for spooling, while ROWS uses in-memory (if possible). I would try swapping out RANGE and put ROWS instead to see if:

  1. The semantics are still the same (e.g. you get the expected results)
  2. The plan doesn't change in the same way (e.g. you always get the expected results)

For some queries these can give the same semantics, and for others it can actually change the underlying meaning, so I'll stress again that you should test this change. If the semantics are the same, I can almost guarantee that the performance will improve (and your likelihood of plan skew will go down).

I'm not contesting whether the behavior you spotted is a bug, just suggesting a way you might be able to work around it. It may prevent the plan from going parallel just because of the different interaction with on-disk vs. in-memory.

I'd be curious to look into this further, can you post a data population script or a backup somewhere (obviously without any proprietary / private data) to investgate this closer?

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Aaron. Thanks for this. I can work around the problem by forcing the plan to not go parallel (and keeping the RANGE option so that the window includes all rows with multiple entries for the same date) by using the following: –  Paul McLoughlin Mar 1 '12 at 22:58
    
WITH myCTE AS ( SELECT T.Member, T.Fund, T.TradeDate, SUM(T.Units) OVER(PARTITION BY T.Member, T.Fund ORDER BY T.TradeDate RANGE BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND CURRENT ROW) AS TotalShares, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY T.Member, T.Fund, T.TradeDate ORDER BY T.TradeDate) AS rn FROM Test.Trades AS T ) SELECT * FROM myCTE AS M WHERE M.rn=1; –  Paul McLoughlin Mar 1 '12 at 22:58
    
However, in this case the symantics change: I need to include all rows in the partition with the same fund and trade date in the aggregate. I've got a reproduction script but it is very large (to get the data set needed). Do you have somewhere I could send it to? –  Paul McLoughlin Mar 1 '12 at 23:00
    
I have put a reproduction script at: mediafire.com/?0dl11db38bdav6j –  Paul McLoughlin Mar 1 '12 at 23:19
    
Thanks, I will check it out shortly. I'm at a conference in Seattle but will download the data and play with it this weekend on the flight home perhaps. –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 1 '12 at 23:51
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