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Let says that I do

CASE WHEN apples.fruits = 'Macintosh' THEN 'Green' END AS FruitBasket

How could I make changes using fruit basket now? within this very query?

I'd like to say

CASE WHEN FruitBasket = 'Green' THEN 'Awesome' END AS IsItGood

Keep in mind I'd like those 2 lines of code to run in the same query.

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This is in Postgres I notice now that I did not mention that. –  user519753 Mar 1 '12 at 20:51
1  
Why not: CASE WHEN apples.fruits = 'Macintosh' THEN 'Awesome' END AS IsItGood??? You can do this on the same query. –  Eric Mar 1 '12 at 21:00
    
The idea here is that FruitBasket and IsItGood need to be 2 seperate columns. –  user519753 Mar 2 '12 at 1:45

2 Answers 2

ouldn't you Insert that first query into a temp table and then update that temp table?

Select into #temp CASE WHEN apples.fruits = 'Macintosh' THEN 'Green' END AS FruitBasket,    othercolumn1,othercolumn2 

select CASE WHEN FruitBasket = 'Green' THEN 'Awesome' END AS IsItGood from #temp
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Nope, it's for building a report Sad Face –  user519753 Mar 1 '12 at 20:39
    
Why not: CASE WHEN apples.fruits = 'Macintosh' THEN 'Awesome' END AS IsItGood??? You can do this on the same query. –  Eric Mar 1 '12 at 20:54
    
Just move Eric's temp table into a subquery: select CASE WHEN FruitBasket = 'Green' THEN 'Awesome' END AS IsItGood from (select CASE WHEN apples.fruits = 'Macintosh' THEN 'Green' END AS FruitBasket) x –  Glenn Mar 1 '12 at 21:32

Best approach is a table method.

 CREATE FUNCTION fruit_basket(apples) RETURNS text LANGUAGE SQL AS $$
    CASE WHEN $1.fruits = 'Macintosh' THEN 'Green' END; $$;

Then you can use this like a column except that you must qualify it, because class.method syntax is supported.

 SELECT CASE WHEN a.fruit_basket = 'Green' THEN 'Awesome' end as is_it_good
   FROM apples a;

Note this turns a.fruit_basket into fruit_basket(a) so you cannot omit the a. before fruit_basket.

Note this will perform well because it operates on the tuple from the table, and doesn't hit the table directly. It can be inlined as an SQL macro by the planner.

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