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My first question, sorry if i've made a mistake or this has been answered before, I couldn't find it anyway.

Here's a generic version of my code:

count = 0
classlist = []
for i in xrange(0,100):
    if random.random() < 0.5:
        var_1 = 1
    else:
        var_1 = 2
    count += 5

    classlist.append(Class(var_1,count))

My problem is that after this loop has run, every instance of class has the final value of count (5*100 = 500 in this example).

How can I create a list of class instances with different values of count?

EDIT: indentation was correct.

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looks like you need to edit the code, or you're only adding to the list once –  macduff Mar 1 '12 at 21:55
    
Your indentation is off. You need to append inside the loop. Indent classlist.append one more level –  Praveen Gollakota Mar 1 '12 at 21:55

4 Answers 4

Maybe this is what you want?

count = 0
classlist = []
for i in xrange(0,100):
    if random.random() < 0.5:
        var_1 = 1
    else:
        var_1 = 2
    count += 5
    classlist.append(Class(var_1,count))
share|improve this answer

At the minimum you'd need to move classlist.append(Class(var_1,count)) inside of the for loop.

Assuming the code is a follows:

import random

class Class(object):
    """Trivial demo class"""
    def __init__(self, var, count):
        """Construct an instance"""
        super(Class, self).__init__()
        self.var = var
        self.count = count

    def __str__(self):
        """Produce a string representation"""
        return "(var = {0}, count = {1})".format(self.var, self.count)

count = 0
classlist = []
for i in xrange(0,10):
    if random.random() < 0.5:
        var_1 = 1
    else:
        var_1 = 2
    count += 5

    classlist.append(Class(var_1,count))

print "\n".join([str(x) for x in classlist])

Produces:

(var = 2, count = 5)
(var = 2, count = 10)
(var = 1, count = 15)
(var = 1, count = 20)
(var = 2, count = 25)
(var = 2, count = 30)
(var = 2, count = 35)
(var = 2, count = 40)
(var = 2, count = 45)
(var = 2, count = 50)

It works. The issue may be that the field you store count in is a class (static) field. In your class definition make sure that you didn't make count a static. See my code for an example.

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Sorry, the indentation should have been like that from the start. Other than the indentation, this should work, right? I'm struggling to trace this... –  therainingmonkey Mar 2 '12 at 16:01

I guess your class init code sets class attributes, notinstance attributes:

class Class: # bad name
    def __init__(self, v, c):
        Class.v = v # should be self.v = v
        Class.c = c # should be self.c = c 
share|improve this answer
    
No, it's setting self.x –  therainingmonkey Mar 2 '12 at 16:10

Found it, I think I'm passing the class an instance of count rather than it's value (in my code, count is a list).

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