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#define SOUND_SPEED 0.034;    
int rtt; //round trip time in microsecond
double distance;
distance = (double)(rtt*SOUND_SPEED)/2;

It complains error: expected expression before '/' token. Was is it bacause I can't use macro to define decimals or what?

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3  
+1 A silly mistake--which I still make once every few years :( –  Joseph Quinsey Mar 1 '12 at 22:08
    
possible duplicate of strange error with #define in c –  Gilles Jul 9 '12 at 20:33
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3 Answers 3

You're using C, but you're trying to use a C++ style // comment. Depending on your compiler, that may not be allowed.

Edit: In fact, gcc -c89 -ansi gives that exact error message for a // comment and a totally different one for the extraneous ; in the define.

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I didn't downvote but // are also C comments –  ouah Mar 1 '12 at 22:03
    
@ouah From C99 they are, but older compilers may definitely fail on this code. Since the question didn't mention what compiler is used, I thought it worth a mention. –  Joachim Isaksson Mar 1 '12 at 22:05
    
Honestly I even don't know any C89 compiler that doesn't support it as a default extension. –  ouah Mar 1 '12 at 22:06
    
@ouah Sun's C compiler used to fail on it in the 90's, not sure if any current compilers in C89 mode do. But as I said, no mention of whether the compiler was even C89. –  Joachim Isaksson Mar 1 '12 at 22:09
1  
@ouah A // comment with gcc -c89 -ansi gives the error in the question error: expected expression before ‘/’ token while the semicolon in the define gives error: expected ‘)’ before ‘;’ token in any mode. The question refers to the / token one. –  Joachim Isaksson Mar 1 '12 at 22:18
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#define SOUND_SPEED 0.034;
                         ^

Do not use the trailing ;

Actually you should never terminate a macro with a ;:

PRE11-C. Do not conclude macro definitions with a semicolon https://www.securecoding.cert.org/confluence/display/seccode/PRE11-C.+Do+not+conclude+macro+definitions+with+a+semicolon

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Drop the semicolon:

#define SOUND_SPEED 0.034; 
                         ^

If you keep it the generated code will look like this:

distance = (double)(rtt*SOUND_SPEED;)/2;
                                   ^
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Its get more convincing to look at the pre-processor output, e.g. gcc -E foo.c –  Arun Mar 1 '12 at 22:18
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