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Hello i want to join these two queries to end up with one that has the name of the table, the number of columns in the table and and number of columns with foreign keys.

This query produces the table name and column count

select t.table_name,  count(t.table_name)
from all_constraints  t 
where owner = 'PARRANDEROS' group by t.table_name;

The other query the foreign key count.

select table_name,  count(constraint_type)
from all_constraints  
where owner = 'PARRANDEROS' and constraint_type ='R'group by table_name;

How do i join this two queries? Im using a oracle DB.

EDIT: Some told me i wasn't selecting the number of columns in each table. So how do I count the number for each table in the DB?

share|improve this question
1  
I'm not sure that I follow. Neither query returns the results you say it does. Both queries return the number of constraints on the table. Neither is specific to foreign keys and neither has anything to do with the number of columns in the table or the number of columns with foreign key constraints. Are you assuming that all foreign key constraints are on single columns rather than being composite keys? – Justin Cave Mar 1 '12 at 22:38
    
Sorry i just update the second query, now it selects all the columns with the foreign key constraint. – serpiente Mar 1 '12 at 22:46
1  
Did you mean to get the column count from all_tab_columns? – Joey Mar 1 '12 at 22:47
    
@serpiente - It still isn't selecting the number of columns with foreign key constraints. It is selecting the number of foreign key constraints defined on the table. – Justin Cave Mar 1 '12 at 22:50
    
@serpiente - Updated my answer to count the number of columns in the table and the number of foreign key constraints rather than combining the two queries. – Justin Cave Mar 2 '12 at 0:58

You can combine the queries

SELECT table_name, 
       COUNT(*) number_of_constraints,
       SUM( CASE WHEN constraint_type = 'R' 
                 THEN 1
                 ELSE 0
              END) number_of_fk_constraints
  FROM all_constraints
 WHERE owner = 'PARRANDEROS'
 GROUP BY table_name

This does not retrieve the number of columns in the table but neither do either of your existing queries. It does return the number of constraints defined on the table. This does not retrieve the number of columns in the table that are part of a foreign key constraint but neither does your second query unless we assume that all foreign key constraints are defined on a single column rather than potentially being defined on composite keys.

If you want to count the number of columns in the table and the number of foreign key constraints in the table (note that may be different than the number of columns that are involved in foreign key constraints)

SELECT t.table_name,
       (SELECT COUNT(*)
          FROM all_tab_cols cols
         WHERE cols.owner = t.owner
           AND cols.table_name = t.table_name) number_of_columns,
       (SELECT COUNT(*)
          FROM all_constraints cons
         WHERE constraint_type = 'R'
           AND cons.owner = t.owner
           AND cons.table_name = t.table_name) number_of_constraints
  FROM all_tables t
 WHERE t.owner = 'PARRANDEROS'
 GROUP BY t.table_name
share|improve this answer

OK, the key is that you want to grab column names from ALL_TAB_COLUMNS:

SELECT table_name, COUNT(column_name)
  FROM all_tab_columns
 WHERE owner = 'PARRANDEROS'
 GROUP BY table_name

In order to get the number of columns that also have foreign key constraints on them, you'll have to join to ALL_CONS_COLUMNS and ALL_CONSTRAINTS as well. These should be outer joins because a column might well not have any constraint at all on it, and the DISTINCTs are used because a column could have more than one constraint on it.

SELECT a.table_name, COUNT(DISTINCT a.column_name) AS column_cnt
     , COUNT( DISTINCT DECODE(c.constraint_type, 'R', a.column_name || '|' || c.constraint_name, null) ) AS fk_cnt
  FROM all_tab_columns a, all_cons_columns b, all_constraints c
 WHERE a.owner = 'PARRANDEROS'
   AND a.owner = b.owner(+)
   AND a.table_name = b.table_name(+)
   AND a.column_name = b.column_name(+)
   AND b.owner = c.owner(+)
   AND b.table_name = c.table_name(+)
   AND b.constraint_name = c.constraint_name(+)
 GROUP BY a.table_name

Hope this helps.

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