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in my app I am displaying number strings and noticed that "7.000444" displays as "7.00044". In addition, "0.567567" displays as "0.56757". Finally, adding any non number part(ie a letter) makes them display with the full number followed by the other key. Is there a way to stop the behaviour of the first two? I am displaying them by adding that to a database which is then displayed in a ListView. The code for creating the string is a set of buttons, for the buttons 0-9 it is:

Button one;
one = (Button)findViewById(R.id.one);
one.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(View v) {
            working = BigDecimal.valueOf(1);
            now = working.toString();
            total1 = total.concat(now);
            equation1 = equation.concat(now);
            equation = equation1;
            total = total1;
            if(b){mnDbHelper.updateNote(equation, mnDbHelper.testCount());}
            else{mnDbHelper.createNote(equation);
            b=true;}
            fillData();
        }
});

With the 1 being changed as necessary. The decimal point button is as follows:

Button decimal;
decimal = (Button)findViewById(R.id.decimal);
decimal.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {

        public void onClick(View v) {
            now = ".";
            equation1 = equation.concat(now);
            total1 = total.concat(now);
            equation = equation1;
            total = total1;
            if(b){mnDbHelper.updateNote(equation, mnDbHelper.testCount());}
            else{mnDbHelper.createNote(equation);
            b=true;}
            fillData();
        }

});

Here is the code for FillData:

private void fillData() {
    // Get all of the notes from the database and create the item list
    Cursor c = mnDbHelper.fetchAllNotes();

    startManagingCursor(c);

   String[] columns = new String[] {EquationsDbAdapter.KEY_VALUE};

   int to[] = new int[] {android.R.id.text1};

   SimpleCursorAdapter adapter = new SimpleCursorAdapter(this,android.R.layout.simple_list_item_1 ,c , columns , to);

   setListAdapter(adapter);

}

Here is sample code for one of the other buttons:

  Button times;
        times = (Button)findViewById(R.id.times);
        times.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {

            public void onClick(View v) {
                now = "*";
                equation1 = equation.concat(now);r = equation;
                equation = equation1;z = equation;
                if(total!="")
                {try{
                    formatter.parse(total);
                }
                catch(Throwable t){
                    really = false;
                }
                if(really){
                    try {
                        mDbHelper.createNote((BigDecimal) formatter.parse(total), fa, fa, fa, fa, fa, fa, jkl, fa, fa);
                    } catch (ParseException e) {
                        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                        e.printStackTrace();
                    }
                total = "";
                total1 = "";}
                else{really = true;}}
                mDbHelper.createNote(jkl, fa, fa, t, fa, fa, fa, jkl, fa, fa);
                if(b){mnDbHelper.updateNote(equation, mnDbHelper.testCount());}
                else{mnDbHelper.createNote(equation);
                b=true;}
                fillData();
            }
    });

formatter is as follows:

 DecimalFormat formatter = new DecimalFormat("##################################################################################.################################");

Edit: oddly enough "0.33333333" displayed doesn't display right, but when * is added it does, however when * is subtracted from it again it doesn't. As always, help is greatly appreciated.

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2  
You must be doing something odd with your String. How do you display it? System.out.println() doesn't trim Strings, no matter their content. –  kba Mar 1 '12 at 22:44
3  
How exactly are you displaying the numbers (or converting them to strings)? –  Taymon Mar 1 '12 at 22:46
    
I am displaying them by adding that to a database which is then displayed in a ListView, adding this to OP. –  jersam515 Mar 1 '12 at 22:50
1  
Could you please post the actual code which converts the number to something other than a Java double? (If it goes directly into a database, then that's when that happens.) –  Taymon Mar 1 '12 at 22:54
    
Added code requests. –  jersam515 Mar 1 '12 at 23:09

3 Answers 3

This is so interesting, because the obvious, double instead of BigDecimal, is not the case. You mentioned the database. Maybe you reload the field from the database, and the record field is a DOUBLE and not DECIMAL, or DECIMAL with wrong precision.

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The database saves the string as a string. The other one that does calculations uses a blob. What I find odd about it is that "0.6758431" doesn't display correctly but after I add a * to it it displays as "0.6758431*" –  jersam515 Mar 2 '12 at 0:09

Edit:

Huh. Well the problem does not seem to be in the formatter object. It returns a Double unless the setParseBigDecimal(true) has been called but you'd get a cast error if you tried to cast a Double to a BigDecimal. I don't think you need the formatter and should be calling the following but I don't see where that causes the truncation:

new BigDecimal(total)

Is suspect that somewhere you are going from a String to a double or float which is truncating the precision of the BigDecimal. For example, are you sure you aren't doing:

working = BigDecimal.valueOf((double)value);

Make sure that you are using the String constructor for BigDecimal:

working = new BigDecimal(valueStr);

This does a character-by-character processing of the string to create the BigDecimal without a loss in precision.

If you provide more details (like many comments have asked) and show the code that is actually creating the BigDecimal than I'll edit my answer to provide more information.


The code:

if(total!="")

is not right. You rarely want to compare strings with == or !=. I suspect that should be:

if (!("".equals(total)))

or maybe

if (total.length() > 0)
share|improve this answer
    
I don't display working, I display equation which never uses double or float to construct itself. –  jersam515 Mar 1 '12 at 23:25
    
Please edit your question to show that code which @jersam515. –  Gray Mar 1 '12 at 23:26
    
Ok, I did. Thanks for looking into my question. –  jersam515 Mar 1 '12 at 23:29
up vote 0 down vote accepted

What I ended up doing was just adding a space to the beginning of the string, and that worked.

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