Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an object, let's call it o, and a reference to o.

Within the scope of o, I set a member, let's call it m.

So in o, I call:

o.m = "blah"

Outside of o, I access m:

console.log(o.m)

Which gives me something that isn't "blah". I did:

console.log(this == this.parent.o)

which returns true. How is this possible? I'm using Chrome 17.0.963.56 m

EDIT

Also, I've tried within object o:

this.m = "blah"
console.log(this.m) // prints "blah"

but after exiting that scope and do:

console.log(o.m)

it prints something different.

Relevant code (see this.addEvent("playPauseButtonClicked")):

    // Controller code (singleton)
    function controller() {
        if (window.c) { return window.c; }
        window.c = this;
    ...
        // Event handling
        this.addEvent = function(eventName, callback) {
            if (!this.events[eventName]) this.events[eventName] = [];

            this.events[eventName].push(callback);
        }
        this.raiseEvent = function(eventName) {
            self = getController();
            if (self.events[eventName]) {
                var callbacks = self.events[eventName];
                var i = 0;
                for (i = 0; i<callbacks.length; ++i) {
                    callbacks[i]();
                }
            }
        }

        this.musicplayer = new zeitgeistPlayer(this, this.songStatus);
    ...
        this.addEvent("playPauseButtonClicked", function() {
            var controller = getController();
            var musicplayer = controller.musicplayer;
            switch (musicplayer.state) {
                case "paused":
                    musicplayer.resume();
                    controller.view.setButtonProperty("playPauseButton", "pause", true);
                    break;
                case "playing":
                    musicplayer.pause();
                    controller.view.setButtonProperty("playPauseButton", "pause", false);
                    break;
                case "stopped":
                    controller.playSong();
                    controller.view.setButtonProperty("playPauseButton", "pause", true);
                    break;
            }
        });

        if (this.playQueue.length == 0) this.view.setButtonProperty("playPauseButton", "disabled", true);

        this.raiseEvent("controllerLoaded");
    }

    // Functional classes
    function basePlayer(songStatus) {
        this.state = "stopped";    // states are: stopped, playing, paused
    ...
    }

    // implementation of basePlayer using the zeitgeist flash player
    function zeitgeistPlayer(controller, songStatus) {
        $.extend(this, new basePlayer(songStatus));
    ...
        this.controller = controller;

    ...

        this.pause = function () {
            if (this.controller.debug) console.log("player pausing");
            this.state = "paused";
            this.swf.pauseSong();
            if (this.controller.debug) console.log("player "+this.state);
            console.log(this);
            console.log(getController().musicplayer);
            console.log(this==getController().musicplayer);
        }
    ...
    }
share|improve this question
2  
console is not realtime –  Joe Mar 1 '12 at 23:31
    
I could give you an answer if your question was phrased better with a realistic test case. In so far, var a = {a:'h'}, b = {a:'h'}; console.log(a.a==b.a); returns true to me. –  Christian Mar 1 '12 at 23:37
    
You have to initialize the variable. var o = new obj; console.log(o.m); –  Relic Mar 1 '12 at 23:38
    
p.changeState(); There is no p variable. What is your actual code? –  squint Mar 1 '12 at 23:46
1  
What happened to the code you just posted?!?! I wrote a long answer based on that, and now you've got something completely different up there –  Adam Rackis Mar 2 '12 at 0:00

3 Answers 3

If you're inside of o, and you want to set m, you would say:

this.m = "blah";

it's possible that inside o, o is scoped to be something else, which is why things are not behaving as expected.


EDIT 2 -- it looks like OP just changed his question, so the code below probably isn't relevant anymore -- sigh


EDIT

It looks like there are a few problems. For one:

this.p = new player();

Where your player constructor looks like

function player(controller) {
    this.controller = controller;

You're not passing anything in for controller, which is why you're getting the error about undefined p. Try this:

this.p = new player(this);

Also, in your controller constructor, once you define p to be a property of the return object—this.p = new player(this)—you need to refer to it as this.p from then on; p by itself is undeclared. So

function controller() {
    this.p = new player(this);
    p.changeState();
    console.log(p.state);

needs to be

function controller() {
    this.p = new player(this);
    this.p.changeState();
    console.log(this.p.state);
share|improve this answer
    
I've tried that too. –  dookehster Mar 1 '12 at 23:34
    
@dookehster - can you post your full code please –  Adam Rackis Mar 1 '12 at 23:34
    
@dookehster - I see your edit, but can you please post your entire definition of o? –  Adam Rackis Mar 1 '12 at 23:37

You have to initialize the variable.

var x = new o; console.log(o.m);

share|improve this answer
2  
Huh?! If the (weaker) equal operator failed, what makes you think the (stricter) identity operator will work? –  Christian Mar 1 '12 at 23:35
    
because he wants it to return false... maybe I'm missing what he's actually trying to do here and what his actual question is... –  Relic Mar 1 '12 at 23:37

I'd change

this.p = new player();
p.changeState();
console.log(p.state);

to

this.p = new player(this);
this.p.changeState();
console.log(this.p.state);

Two changes:

  1. p doesn't exist as a local variable in that context -- you need to use this.p
  2. the player constructor needs a controller reference
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.