Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When programming generic classes, I end up with methods cluttered with casts (otherwise I get warnings, which are treated as errors for our projects):

template <typename floatType>
class foo
{
public:
  typedef floatType real_type;

  real_type bar()
  {
    real_type a = (real_type)0.5; // should I be using static_cast? Either way, the code becomes cluttered quickly
    real_type b = a + 0.6; // warning here for floatType = float

    real_type someLongEquation = a + ((real_type)0.5 * (real_type)100) + (real_type)17.0;

    return a + b + someLongEquation;
  }
};

int main()
{
  {
    foo<float> z;
    z.bar();
  }

  {
    foo<double> z;
    z.bar();
  }

  return 0;
}

Is there any way to reduce that clutter?

Note that I realize I am using magic constants in the someLongEquation. Even if I separate them out, there is increased clutter. Either way, that is not the point of the question :)

share|improve this question
    
what are the warnings you get? –  David Brown Mar 1 '12 at 23:57
    
@DavidBrown: Conversion from 'double' to 'float', possible loss of data (pretty standard for casts between built-in types that may results in loss of precision) –  Samaursa Mar 2 '12 at 0:07
    
Just put f after each constant value. Assigning float to double is okay ;) –  iccthedral Mar 2 '12 at 0:13
    
What compiler are you using? –  Robᵩ Mar 2 '12 at 0:16
    
@Rob: MSVC (the warning gives that away if you've been using MSVC). –  Xeo Mar 2 '12 at 0:19
add comment

2 Answers

A simple way would be to just turn off the warning around the code. With MSVC:

#pragma warning(push) // save warnings state
#pragma warning(disable:4244) // narrowing conversion
// code here ...
#pragma warning(pop) // restore warnings

The better way, however, would be to just use float literals if you don't need the extended precision of double for your magic constants. Just append an f to your floating point literals and you'll be fine. Also, no cast needed for the 100. If you do in fact need the precision, well, fall back to disabling the warning.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You should separate the magic constants out and store them in the right generic type. All the casting will be limited to that location. Now that (I think) C++11 allows in class initialization of non-integral const statics it's easy.

template <typename floatType>
class foo
{
public:
  typedef floatType real_type;

  static constexpr real_type A = real_type(0.5);
  static constexpr real_type B = real_type(0.6);
  static constexpr real_type C = real_type(100.0);
  static constexpr real_type D = real_type(17.0);

  real_type bar()
  {
    real_type a = A;
    real_type b = a + B;

    real_type someLongEquation = a + (A * C) + D;

    return a + b + someLongEquation;
  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
IIRC, C++11 only allows that for non-static members. –  Xeo Mar 14 '12 at 7:27
    
@Xeo I wasn't able to find the references before, but now I have. static constexpr data members can be initialized in-class if they have 'literal type', which includes float. [class.static.data] §9.4.2/3 –  bames53 Mar 14 '12 at 16:05
    
Ah, yeah, I overlooked the constexpr somehow. :) –  Xeo Mar 14 '12 at 17:43
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.