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hey guys i am trying to shuffle the contents of my dynamic array and its not working. im wondering if yall got any advice or links/resources that can help me out. i am trying to use std::randomshuffle but my test is spitting out 0s instead of correct data.

Songs *ptr;
ptr = new Songs[25];

ifstream fin;
fin.open("input.txt");

while (fin.good())                   //my input 
{
      getline(fin, song[num].title);    
      getline(fin, song[num].artist);
      fin >> song[num].mem;
      num++;
      fin>>ws;
}
fin.close();

and heres my function im trying to use the randomshuffle

void shuffle (char choice, Songs song[], Songs *ptr, string title, string artist, int  mem, int num)
{
    if (choice == '4')
    {  
        std::random_shuffle(ptr, ptr + num);             //shuffle
    }
    for (int i = 0; i<num; i++)    //test
    {
        cout << ptr[i].title << ptr[i].artist << ptr[i].mem << endl;   
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Why all the parameters to the shuffle() function? You're only using ptr and num. And logic whether to shuffle or not shouldn't really be done inside a shuffling function. –  jrok Mar 2 '12 at 0:09
    
well those are the contents of my ptr array so i figured i had to include those as well –  gamergirl22 Mar 2 '12 at 0:17
    
@gamergirl22 absolutely do not need to and should not do this. Later you have to think about how to design code effectively: the point of this shuffle function is to shuffle the songs and print them out. So all we need are the songs and num (not that 'song' and 'ptr') are also redundant. –  stinky472 Mar 2 '12 at 0:22
1  
@gamergirl22 As for shuffling, there's nothing wrong with how you are shuffling those songs assuming you passed in the correct arguments for 'ptr' and 'num'. I suspect where your program is failing is in reading in the songs. You may want to output the songs right after they are read in from the file or, better yet, learn how to use the debugger and you can see the values of all your variables as you trace through the code. –  stinky472 Mar 2 '12 at 0:23
    
And don't use new when there's no reason. Use std::vector instead, it'll take care of dynamically resizing itself and fitting whatever number of songs there'll be in the file. –  jrok Mar 2 '12 at 0:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Please consider the following, this is a more modern C++ approach to your problem. You create stream operator so you don't have to parse the object manually each time you wish to read in.

#include <algorithm>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>
#include <iterator>

struct song {
        std::string title, artist;
        int mem;
};

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const song& s) {
        return os << s.title << "\t" << s.artist << "\t" << s.mem;
}

std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& is, song& s) {
        std::getline(is, s.title);
        std::getline(is, s.artist);
        return is >> s.mem;
}

int main()
{
        std::ifstream file("input.txt"); 

        if(!file.is_open()) return 1;

        std::vector<song> songs((std::istream_iterator<song>(file)),
                                 std::istream_iterator<song>());
        std::random_shuffle(songs.begin(), songs.end());

        std::copy(songs.begin(), songs.end(), 
                  std::ostream_iterator<song>(std::cout, "\n"));
        return 0;
}

compiles but UNTESTED ON YOUR FILE FORMAT

without vector (BUT PLEASE LEARN THEM) this:

       std::vector<song> songs((std::istream_iterator<song>(file)),
                                 std::istream_iterator<song>());

can be written as:

 const size_t sz=20;
 song songs[sz];
 for(unsigned i=0; i!=sz && file; ++i)
     file >> songs[i];

and the rest of the function call will work like

std::random_shuffle(songs, songs+sz);

but seriously learn vectors now (and then the other containers). Array are basically considered deprecated for your task, an example of why, is that if you had more than 20 elements in the file you would get a buffer overrun and bad thing would happen.

http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/container/vector

Also you don't need to explicitly open and close files (in most cases you are more likely to introduce bugs) because of RAII:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resource_Acquisition_Is_Initialization

share|improve this answer
    
this looks very good but unfortunately i havent learned vectors so i wouldnt know how to incorporate this into my function calls ,etc. lol. very good work tho i vote u up. –  gamergirl22 Mar 2 '12 at 0:49
1  
LEARN VECTORS NOW THIS SECOND! seriously –  111111 Mar 2 '12 at 0:51
    
@gamergirl22 Look again, I have added an extra bit –  111111 Mar 2 '12 at 0:54

Never use istream::good() or istream::eof() as a loop condition. It almost always produces buggy code (as it does in this case.)

Try:

while (std::getline(fin, song[num].title) &&
       std::getline(fin, song[num].artist) &&
       fin >> song[num].mem) 
{
      num++;
      fin>>ws;
}

As stinky points out, your shuffle is correct, although terrible style. Try:

void shuffle (char choice, Songs *ptr, int num)
{
    if (choice == '4')
    {  
        std::random_shuffle(ptr, ptr + num);             //shuffle
    }
    for (int i = 0; i<num; i++)    //test
    {
        std::cout << ptr[i].title << ptr[i].artist << ptr[i].mem << "\n";   
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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