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Currently building an app that runs on mobile phones not related to the issue at hand, but through a certain event the app lands in a state, either online or offline (internet available on the phone or not)

the offline app is very limited, only a few screens available)

now stop me if you catch me doing something stupid or something that i could to a lot better, but my first thought was to have the Router have a dynamic set of routes,

much like you can define a dynamic url property on a collection.

so instead of this:

var router = Backbone.Router.extend({
    routes: {
        '' : 'homeAction',
        'categories' : 'categoriesAction',
        ...
    },
    homeAction: function(){ },
    categoriesAction: function(){ }
});

i was thinking of this:

var router = Backbone.Router.extend({
    initialize: function(){
        this.on('app:togglestate', this.toggleRoutes, this);
    },
    toggleRoutes: function () {
        var router = this;
        if(App.onlineModus)
            router.routes = { /* hash with online routes here */ };
        else
            router.routes = { /* hash with offline routes here */ };
    },
    routes: {
        '' : 'homeAction',
        'categories' : 'categoriesAction',
        ...
    },
    homeAction: function(){ },
    categoriesAction: function(){ }
});

though that aparently breaks the whole app, as the Backbone.history.start(); throws an error, cannot call function start from undefined. leading me to believe i the routes object is somehow used upon initialization and cannot be changed on the fly.

am i possibly thinking to far? should i achieve this some other way?

other idea's i had were:

  • having the routes exactly like url, where the routes argument is a function returning a hash, that didn't work either
  • and now i'm thinking totally differnt, something along the lines of testing if the app is in online or offline modus in every route's Action. though that seems too mutch i'd probably have to relay them all through a single Action, which only passes to the actual action if the route is accessible in offline modus? but i would not really have a clear idea on how to start with such a relay action without writing too mutch boilerplate code...
share|improve this question
    
i feared as much, so i would need to look at one of the other two options, either passing all actions through a gateway action to first pass this test, or i need to work with switching two router objects. can you dynamically unload a router mid-application-execution? i'm going to try that first i think. –  Sander Mar 2 '12 at 6:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In order to dynamically update the routes you will need to make a call to _bindRoutes() after updating the routes.

For example:

toggleRoutes: function () {
    var router = this;
    if(App.onlineModus)
        router.routes = { /* hash with online routes here */ };
    else
        router.routes = { /* hash with offline routes here */ };

    // Get rid of previous navigation history
    if(Backbone.history){
        Backbone.history == null;
    }

    // Bind the new routes
    router._bindRoutes();
}

Note that when you dynamically change the routes the history is no longer valid so you need to delete the previous history. When _bindRoutes is called it automatically instantiates a new Backbone.history when is called this.route.

share|improve this answer
    
this is a working example, though somewhat of a hack, since you call a n _ function, which is supposed to mark it as a private. It's not supposed to be called directly. though you are right, if you don't mind to use this hack, it's a perfectly working solution. thanks for the answer! –  Sander Jun 29 '12 at 9:51

I had to do something very similar. I don't have the code in front of me, but this should be right around what I did: (Edit: fleshed it out a bit so you can actually run it now)

ApplicationRouter = Backbone.Router.extend({
    //some stuff
    constructor: function (routes) {
        this.routes = routes;
        Backbone.Router.prototype.constructor.call(this);
    }
});

routeObject = {
    "help": "help"
}

ApplicationRouter.instance = function(routes) {
    if (!this._instance) {
        this._instance = new ApplicationRouter(routes);
    }
    return this._instance;
}
ApplicationRouter.instance(routeObject);
ApplicationRouter.instance().on('route:help', function() {
    console.log('helped');
});
Backbone.history.start();
//now go to page#help - the console will say "helped"

From then on out, I just referenced ApplicationRouter.instance() when I needed access to the application router.

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