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I am trying to create an object in javascript that has an animation run which calls another method when it finishes.

function panel_manager() {
    this.animating = false;

    this.doAnimate = function (nPanel) {
        //if we're still moving panels, do nothing
        if(this.animating) return;

        this.animating = true;

        //enlarge new panel
        $("#panel" + this.focusedPanel).animate({width:"115px"},1000, this.endAnim);
    }

    this.endAnim = function () { alert("called"); this.animating = false; }
}

A whole lot has been cut for brevity and this code does work when it isn't inside an object and uses global variables. The alert runs, but animating isn't changing.

share|improve this question
    
$("#panel" + this.focusedPanel).animate(blah ,1000, this.endAnim); <-- this.endAnim is referring to $("#panel" + this.focusedPanel). –  Derek 朕會功夫 Mar 2 '12 at 1:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

variables.

function panel_manager() {
    var that = this;
    this.animating = false;
    this.doAnimate = function (nPanel) {
        if(this.animating) return;
        this.animating = true;
        $("#panel" + this.focusedPanel).animate({width:"115px"},1000, that.endAnim);
    }
    this.endAnim = function () { alert("called"); that.animating = false; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Works, and I assume this is less overhead/processing to do it. –  BeaverusIV Mar 2 '12 at 1:44
    
I'll point out there are more opportunities for optimization (mainly cache the 'panel' object) but I wanted the OP to see the subtle difference needed to achieve the desired results. Proxy (or Function.prototype.bind) is more used when a function will be shared--this function only belongs to the single instance, so scoping a variable for the closure is simply correct. –  AutoSponge Mar 2 '12 at 2:52

Inside of this.doAnimate add a $.proxy.

var callback = $.proxy( this.endAnim, this );

$("#panel" + this.focusedPanel).animate({width:"115px"},1000, callback);

Basically the problem is you lose your this value when you assign it to a callback like this. proxy will make sure the function is called with the proper this.

Cheers!

share|improve this answer
    
I assumed that was my problem, just couldn't find any solution to it. Thanks, it works now. –  BeaverusIV Mar 2 '12 at 1:15
    
You're inside the closure, don't use $.proxy when you can just use a variable. –  AutoSponge Mar 2 '12 at 1:18
    
Please elaborate then, AutoSponge. Thanks. –  BeaverusIV Mar 2 '12 at 1:19
    
sure seems like a downvote wasn't needed for a working example and an answer to the question. but yes, that works, ur a hero for sure. thanks. –  sic1 Mar 2 '12 at 2:01
    
sci1, it's not personal. You offered up a perfect anti-pattern which should not be emulated--using a framework method when a simple variable will do. Beyond performance, it's just a simple understanding of how scoping works. –  AutoSponge Mar 2 '12 at 2:48

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