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I'm learning about accessor methods and enumeration. I wrote a public class 'Car' under the namespace 'Vehicles', and set private properties such as _manufacturer, _model, _year and _color. I'd like to write a single method to access properties and another to set/update them. This is my class:

using System;

namespace Vehicles
{
    public class Car
    {
        private string _manufacturer;
        private string _model;
        private string _year;
        private string _color;

        public void honkHorn()
        {
            // Add argument for a file name?
            // Code here to play a WAV file?
            MessageBox.Show("Honk!");
        }

        public string getCarInfo(string whichProperty)
        {
            switch (whichProperty)
            {
                case ("manufacturer"):
                   return _manufacturer;
                case ("model"):
                    return _model;
                case ("year"):
                    return _year;
                case ("color"):
                    return _color;
                default:
                    return null;
            }
        }

        public void setCarInfo(string whichProperty, string newValue)
        {
            switch (whichProperty)
            {
                case ("manufacturer"):
                    _manufacturer = newValue;
                    break;
                case ("model"):
                    _model = newValue;
                    break;
                case ("year"):
                    _year = newValue;
                    break;
                case ("color"):
                    _color = newValue;
                    break;
            }
        }
    }
}

And this is my form:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using Vehicles;

namespace CS_Enumeration
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Car myCar = new Car();

        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            myCar.setCarInfo("manufacturer", "Ford");
            labelManfValue.Text = myCar.getCarInfo("manufacturer");

            myCar.setCarInfo("model", "Ranger");
            labelModelValue.Text = myCar.getCarInfo("model");

            myCar.setCarInfo("year", "2012");
            labelYearValue.Text = myCar.getCarInfo("year");

            myCar.setCarInfo("color", "Blue");
            labelColorValue.Text = myCar.getCarInfo("color");
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            myCar.honkHorn();
        }
    }
}

Is this really the best way to write a single method that can get/set? I first tried to cast a string value that matched the name of the object property and return the actual property, but that doesn't work (unless someone knows how to cast a string to an object property?).

Thanks for the replies. This is all an exercise from a book I'm reading. It goes so far as to says that not everything should be public, but not everything should be private either. So how do I know when things should/should not be public/private? Sounds like the book is leading me in the wrong direction as to what's good coding design. Anyone have any book suggestions for learning good coding design practices for Visual C#?

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2  
Why would you do this? Imo this is a horrible design - just expose properties. On top of that you lost all type safety in your current approach and any typo will cause a runtime exception –  BrokenGlass Mar 2 '12 at 2:01
    
See the edit to my original post. This is all based on a C# book I'm reading and the recommendation was for using private variables. I can see from what I had to go through for get/set properties that it is a bit ridiculous. Thanks. –  spickles Mar 2 '12 at 3:10
    
What book is it? We'd like to ignore it, and possibly ridicule it. –  John Saunders Mar 2 '12 at 4:51
    
@JohnSaunders Head First C# –  spickles Mar 3 '12 at 1:58
    
Thanks. Clearly, it's head first, not brain first. –  John Saunders Mar 3 '12 at 2:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Don't do this.

Use public properties instead and you gain type safety and a much more expressive usage of your class. In your current approach any typo in the property name string will cause a run-time exception instead of a compilation error.

Just use properties:

public class Car
{
   public string Manufacturer {get; set;}
   public string Model {get; set;}
   public string Year {get; set;}
   public string Color {get; set;}

  //..
}

Now you can just access the properties directly:

myCar.Manufacturer  = "Ford";
labelManfValue.Text = myCar.Manufacturer;

Also you should define a constructor that fully initializes a Car object, otherwise you might have some properties set, and others not.

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Original post edited. –  spickles Mar 2 '12 at 3:11
    
To define a constructor, do I just add the properties to the class definition, or would it have something to do with enum? Would the constructor look something like public class Car(string manufacturer) –  spickles Mar 2 '12 at 3:15
    
Yes - something like this. As to the public/private debate - based on your example clearly you want read access to these properties from the outside, so at least a read only property - but also properties are compiled into getter/setter methods with a backing field of the same type - which is basically the equivalent of what you were trying to achieve with your setter method. –  BrokenGlass Mar 2 '12 at 3:35
    
Ok, so it sounds like I want to do exactly as you have shown with the {get; set;}. I believe I can still initialize variables when I instantiate the object even if I don't define the constructor, correct? Something like Car porche = new Car({ _speed = fast; }) –  spickles Mar 3 '12 at 2:01

You can do this with reflection:

void Main()
{
    var foo = new Foo();
    foo.Set("bar","test");
    Console.WriteLine(foo.Get("bar"));
}
class Foo
{
    string bar;
    string bop;

    public void Set(string name, string value)
    {
        GetType().GetField(name, BindingFlags.NonPublic|BindingFlags.Instance)
                 .SetValue(this, value);
    }

    public string Get(string name)
    {
        return (string)GetType().GetField(name, BindingFlags.NonPublic|BindingFlags.Instance)
                                .GetValue(this);
    }
}

But it's a pretty bad idea.

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Original post edited. –  spickles Mar 2 '12 at 3:12

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