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I have the following jQuery code:

  $('.active #search').on('mouseout', function () {
    $('#search_box #search').not('.active').each(function(){
      this.value = $('.active #search')[0].value;
    })
  });

It works, but I have to call $('.active #search') twice. How can I refer to the $('.active #search') array from within my inner function?

P/S: I know I'll be complained about giving multiple elements same ID, but this seem to be generated by Rails automatically (text_field_tag).

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ID of a HTML element is supposed to be unique for a valid HTML. Looks like they are not in your HTML based on the code you are using.Can you post the HTML you are using... –  Chandu Mar 2 '12 at 3:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Therese several ways of achieving this:

var activeSearch = $('.active #search');
activeSearch.on('mouseout', function () {
    $('#search_box #search').not('.active').each(function(){
        this.value = activeSearch.val();
    })
});

notice that since this is an id you are querying for you should have only one element so you can replace activeSearch[0].value with activeSearch.val();

second way:

$('.active #search').on('mouseout', function () {
    var activeSearch = $(this);
    $('#search_box #search').not('.active').each(function(){
        this.value = activeSearch.val();
    })
});

when in an event handler $(this) will give you a jquery object of the event sender. you can further simplify it by ignoring jquery and just using plain elements by doing the following:

$('.active #search').on('mouseout', function () {
    var activeSearch = this;
    $('#search_box #search').not('.active').each(function(){
        this.value = activeSearch.value;
    })
});

this is the same as above but you arent dealing with jquery objects.

What you end up using depends on you but the final code snippet would be my preferred way.

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Thanks a lot, Darko, DG3, pete and everyone, for super fast very well-informed answers. –  AdamNYC Mar 2 '12 at 3:51

I think this is what you're looking for:

$('.active #search').on('mouseout', function () {
    var val = $(this)[0].value; //cache value of $('.active #search').
    $('#search_box #search').not('.active').each(function () {
        this.value = val;
    })
});
share|improve this answer

You can do something like below. I added self = $(this)

    $('.active #search').on('mouseout', function () {
          var self = $(this);
          $('#search_box #search').not('.active').each(function(){
                this.value = self[0].value;
          });
  });

Here is a link to very good explanation of 'this' keyword, explained by Jeffrey Way

tutsplus.com/lesson/the-this-keyword

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Thanks a lot, DG3. Could you explain to me what $(this) means? search for this element from DOM? –  AdamNYC Mar 2 '12 at 3:11
    
@ADAM NYC, you can get a very good explanation of $(this) in this video tutsplus.com/lesson/the-this-keyword. –  DG3 Mar 2 '12 at 3:15

You can use $(this) instead of using the $('.active #search')

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1  
no, $(this) within each refers to the current item in the loop, but not the mouseout event. –  DG3 Mar 2 '12 at 3:10

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