Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Delphi 2007, I am using one class to implement one of the supported interfaces of second class. This is working. The Delphi help states:

By default, using the implements keyword delegates all interface methods. However, you can use methods resolution clauses or declare methods in your class that implement some of the interface methods to override this default behavior.

However, when I declare a method in my second class that has the matching signature of one of the interface methods, it isn't getting called.

I wonder if this is because I'm accessing the class through another interface when I create it.

Below is a test program that demonstrates my problem:

program Project1;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

type
  IInterface1 = interface
  ['{15400E71-A39B-4503-BE58-B6D19409CF90}']
    procedure AProc;
  end;

  IInterface2 = interface
  ['{1E41CDBF-3C80-4E3E-8F27-CB18718E8FA3}']
  end;

  TDelegate = class(TObject)
  protected
    procedure AProc;
  end;

  TMyClass = class(TInterfacedObject, IInterface1, IInterface2)
  strict private
    FDelegate: TDelegate;
    property Delegate: TDelegate read FDelegate implements IInterface1;
  public
    constructor Create;
    destructor Destroy; override;
    procedure AProc;
  end;

procedure TDelegate.AProc;

begin
  writeln('TClassDelegate.AProc');
end;

constructor TMyClass.Create;
begin
  inherited;
  FDelegate := TDelegate.Create;
end;

destructor TMyClass.Destroy;
begin
  FDelegate.Free;
  inherited;
end;

procedure TMyClass.AProc;

begin
  writeln('TMyClass.AProc');
end;

var
  MyObj : IInterface2;

begin
    MyObj := TMyClass.Create;
   (MyObj as IInterface1).AProc;
end.

When I run this I get as output:

TClassDelegate.AProc

What I want is:

TMyClass.AProc

Any help appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
comment out "FDelegate := TDelegate.Create;" and run it, you'll have a blast (: –  ComputerSaysNo Mar 2 '12 at 3:56
    
@DorinDuminica, thanks for the suggestion. This didn't change the behaviour. Also in my real code, there are other properties and methods in TDelegate, so I think I need to construct an instance to avoid an access violation. Cheers. –  Richard A Mar 2 '12 at 5:20
    
I know, I find it odd that the code works without creating an instance, that was my only point, sorry for not being useful ): –  ComputerSaysNo Mar 2 '12 at 6:10
1  
you are calling IInterface1.AProc (myObj as IInterface1 = TDelegate instance) so (myObj as IInterface1).AProc equals FDelegate.AProc. so this behaviour is expected and correct. if you want to call TMyClass.AProc, you should call it with TMyClass reference. How do you want call procedure of TMyClass, if you have no class reference? –  teran Mar 2 '12 at 8:08
    
ok :) I've understood what you meant :) see answer below. –  teran Mar 2 '12 at 8:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

seems you have to redeclare your method in this way:

TMyClass = class(TInterfacedObject, IInterface1, IInterface2)
strict private
  ....
  procedure test();
public
  ....
  procedure  IInterface1.AProc = test;
end;

procedure TMyClass.test;
begin
  writeln('TMyClass.AProc');
end;

so IInterface1.AProc for TMyClass is mapped to Test() (not to FDelegate.AProc) and result is TMyClass.AProc

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks teran, that works for me. Note that it doesn't compile if test() is strict private, I had to make it protected. –  Richard A Mar 3 '12 at 4:08
    
may be :) in d2010 it compiles ok –  teran Mar 3 '12 at 10:00
    
It guess it serves me right for still using D2007. I'm just scared of porting this project. I should bite the bullet one day. –  Richard A Mar 3 '12 at 11:32

It might be due to the visibility of the property. Every time I use implements the properties are protected or public, same for all the examples I could find in the VCL (eg TAutoObjectEvent.

Attempt #2:

What happens if you remove the AProc() method from TMyClass? Does it then use the one on TDelegate?

share|improve this answer
    
I tried changing TMyClass.Delegate to public, but it made no difference. Similarly, changing TDelegate.AProc to public made no difference. Thanks for the suggestion. –  Richard A Mar 2 '12 at 5:02
    
Attempt #2: Yes it does. That all works as expected, my problem is in trying to override the delegated implementation. –  Richard A Mar 3 '12 at 4:08

The part of documentation you mentioned seems to be outdated. If you try to use method resolution for an interface which is used in an implements clause you will get compiler error E2264: Cannot have method resolutions for interface '%s'.

The solution shown in the link above - to simply give the procedure the same name as declared in the interface - doesn't seem to work, either, in Delphi XE (it compiles but the procedure is not called).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. It's strange that the solution in that link, unless I misread it, is the same approach that I'm trying and isn't working. Thanks for confirming that it doesn't work in XE either. I wondered if it was a peculiarity of D2007. If I ever get the time to port to XE at least I wont have to chase this foible. @teran's solution with a method resolution clause compiles and works. –  Richard A Mar 3 '12 at 4:18

The documentation explicitly states that the behaviour you see is as designed:

If the delegate property is of a class type, that class and its ancestors are searched for methods implementing the specified interface before the enclosing class and its ancestors are searched.

I guess in the full example you have an interface with multiple methods and are wanting the majority specified by the delegate, and specific ones overridden by the implementing class. I can't see how to achieve that with just one class, but it can be done if you introduce a second class:

program Project1;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

type
  IInterface1 = interface
  ['{15400E71-A39B-4503-BE58-B6D19409CF90}']
    procedure AProc;
    procedure AnotherProc;
  end;

  TDelegate = class
  protected
    procedure AProc;
    procedure AnotherProc;
  end;

  TMyClass = class(TInterfacedObject, IInterface1)
  strict private
    FDelegate: TDelegate;
    property Delegate: TDelegate read FDelegate implements IInterface1;
  public
    constructor Create;
    destructor Destroy; override;
    procedure AProc;
  end;

  TMyOtherClass = class(TMyClass, IInterface1)
    procedure IInterface1.AProc = AProc;
  end;

procedure TDelegate.AProc;
begin
  writeln('TDelegate.AProc');
end;

procedure TDelegate.AnotherProc;
begin
  writeln('TDelegate.AnotherProc');
end;

constructor TMyClass.Create;
begin
  inherited;
  FDelegate := TDelegate.Create;
end;

destructor TMyClass.Destroy;
begin
  FDelegate.Free;
  inherited;
end;

procedure TMyClass.AProc;
begin
  writeln('TMyClass.AProc');
end;

var
  MyObj: IInterface1;

begin
  MyObj := TMyOtherClass.Create;
  MyObj.AProc;
  MyObj.AnotherProc;
  Readln;
end.

As @teran points out, if you are prepared to rename your method then there is an easier solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks David, I had read that bit in the documentation, then lost it again in my struggles. I can see no problem with using a different name for the method in the enclosing class, so I'll go with @teran's solution. –  Richard A Mar 3 '12 at 4:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.