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let's say I have a table called users in my database and I want to check if all the users in my table have the permission to execute a certain controller action. If I do something like this:

foreach($users as $user)
{
    // check if user has permission to execute action
    $is_allowed = $this->Acl->check(
            array('model'=>'User', 'foreign_key'=>$the_user_id),
                'controllers/MyController/action_to_be_executed');

    if(!$is_allowed)
    {
        // give permission to user
        $this->Acl->allow(
            array('model'=>'User', 'foreign_key'=>$the_user_id),
                'controllers/MyController/action_to_be_executed');
    }
}

Obviously, if I have something like above, the more users I have in my table, the slower this code will be. Does anyone have any idea how I can optimize this to make it run reasonably fast even though my table contains like more than 5,000 users? Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First thought was to use

$this->Auth->allow('action_to_be_executed');

in MyController controller code, but actually this is probably not what you want to do, because it would grant access to anyone, even to visitors not logged in.

If your goal is to grant access to any authenticated users, this is probably not an optimized solution to add a specific permission for each user <-> action_to_be_executed pair.

Instead, you could link the users to a Role (if not already done), and grant access to the action_to_be_executed action to each role. Thus it will drastically limit the number of permission records in the aros_acos table, and moreover you wouldn't need to execute your code at all, which would be a not too bad optimization ;-)

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