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Using conditional comments it is easy to target Internet Explorer with browser-specific CSS rules:

<!--[if IE 6]>
...include IE6-specific stylesheet here...
<![endif]-->

Sometimes it is the Gecko engine (Firefox) that misbehaves. What would be best way to target only Firefox with your CSS rules and not a single other browser? That is, not only should Internet Explorer ignore the Firefox-only rules, but also WebKit and Opera should.

Note: I'm looking for a 'clean' solution. Using a JavaScript browser sniffer to add a 'firefox' class to my HTML does not qualify as clean in my opinion. I would rather like to see something that depends on browser capabilities, much like conditional comments are only 'special' to IE…

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Might want to look at some similar questions and thier related answers... stackoverflow.com/questions/738831/… –  AnonJr Jun 4 '09 at 20:21
2  
is there any way to target firefox on a windows machine vs a mac? –  Kegan Quimby May 8 '12 at 19:09
2  
<!--[if Gecko ]> ...include... <![endif]--> –  defines Jun 26 '12 at 2:58

6 Answers 6

up vote 626 down vote accepted

OK, I've found it. This is probably the most clean and easy solution out there and does not rely on JavaScript being turned on.

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html>
<head>
<style type="text/css">
@-moz-document url-prefix() {
    h1 {
        color: red;
    }
}
</style>
</head>
<body>

<h1>This should be red in FF</h1>

</body>
</html>

It's based on yet another Mozilla specific CSS extension. There's a whole list for these CSS extensions right here:

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/CSS_Reference/Mozilla_Extensions

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1  
Awesome. Too bad about the domain name (and of course the invalid (?) CSS, but that was to be expected). –  avdgaag Jun 4 '09 at 22:47
4  
What exactly does the url-prefix() mean after the "@-moz-document" ? just curious. –  Matt Jul 13 '11 at 16:59
8  
@Matt, that's a way to filter the websites on which that CSS is applied. Another option is to use the domain() filter. For example @-moz-document domain(google.com) {...} will apply the enclosed CSS rules only on the google.com domain. –  Ionuț G. Stan Jul 14 '11 at 8:48
4  
I like how you don't have to create an entirely new CSS document for this like you do for IE. –  JD Isaacks Oct 6 '11 at 13:35
2  
@JohnIsaacks You don't need a separate stylesheet for the IE conditional comments. They can be inline. Whether you want to do it that way is another question. –  Dylan Nov 18 '11 at 22:36

The only way to do this is via various CSS hacks, which will make your page much more likely to fail on the next browser updates. If anything, it will be LESS safe than using a js-browser sniffer.

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A variation on your idea is to have a server-side USER-AGENT detector that will figure out what style sheet to attach to the page. This way you can have a firefox.css, ie.css, opera.css, etc.

You can accomplish a similar thing in Javascript itself, although you may not regard it as clean.

I have done a similar thing by having a default.css which includes all common styles and then specific style sheets are added to override, or enhance the defaults.

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That does some like a nice and stable approach &mdash; thanks &mdash; although it still depends on browser sniffing. I'd rather use something that depends on capability, like a Gecko-only CSS rule or something. I do use the same basic approach: default styles and browser-specific add-ons. –  avdgaag Jun 4 '09 at 22:13
1  
@avdaag: Capability detection is preferred in most cases, but when you're trying to inject a hack to "fix" a specific rendering engine's bug, then targeting the user agent is, in theory, the optimal solution. You're not discriminating against unknown browsers; and the user-agent field is supposed to tell you what rendering engine the browser is using, so even if a rare Gecko browser comes along, it'll still be given the fix. That said, a lot of browsers now fake their user-agent strings due to inappropriate use of browser-detection. So in practice it might not work out so well. –  Lèse majesté Apr 8 '11 at 8:33

First of all, a disclaimer. I don't really advocate for the solution I present below. The only browser specific CSS I write is for IE (especially IE6), although I wish it wasn't the case.

Now, the solution. You asked it to be elegant so I don't know how elegant is it but it's sure going to target Gecko platforms only.

The trick is only working when JavaScript is enabled and makes use of Mozilla bindings (XBL), which are heavily used internally in Firefox and all other Gecko-based products. For a comparison, this is like the behavior CSS property in IE, but much more powerful.

Three files are involved in my solution:

  1. ff.html: the file to style
  2. ff.xml: the file containg the Gecko bindings
  3. ff.css: Firefox specific styling

ff.html

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html>
<head>
<style type="text/css">
body {
 -moz-binding: url(ff.xml#load-mozilla-css);
}
</style>
</head>
<body>

<h1>This should be red in FF</h1>

</body>
</html>

ff.xml

<?xml version="1.0"?>

<bindings xmlns="http://www.mozilla.org/xbl">
    <binding id="load-mozilla-css">
        <implementation>
            <constructor>
            <![CDATA[
                var link = document.createElement("link");
                    link.setAttribute("rel", "stylesheet");
                    link.setAttribute("type", "text/css");
                    link.setAttribute("href", "ff.css");

                document.getElementsByTagName("head")[0]
                        .appendChild(link);
            ]]>
            </constructor>
        </implementation>
    </binding>
</bindings>

ff.css

h1 {
 color: red;
}

Update: The above solution is not that good. It would be better if instead of appending a new LINK element it will add that "firefox" class on the BODY element. And it's possible, just by replacing the above JS with the following:

this.className += " firefox";

The solution is inspired by Dean Edwards' moz-behaviors.

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+1 for an awesome new-learn, thanks =] –  David Thomas Jun 4 '09 at 21:22
    
Yay for an awesome solution, but I do think it is a bit messy. Also, it depends on Javascript &mdash; which I'm trying to avoid. Still, very interesting. –  avdgaag Jun 4 '09 at 22:11

Here is how to tackle three different browsers: IE, FF and Chrome

    <style type='text/css'>
/*This will work for chrome */
                    #categoryBackNextButtons
                    {
                        width:490px;
                    }
/*This will work for firefox*/
                    @-moz-document url-prefix() {
                        #categoryBackNextButtons{
                        width:486px;
                    }
                    }
                </style>
                <!--[if IE]>
                <style type='text/css'>
/*This will work for IE*/
                #categoryBackNextButtons
                {
                    width:486px;
                }
                </style>
                <![endif]-->
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32  
If I understand this correctly, the top one isn't chrome, but just specifies the default behavior which you override for Firefox and IE. –  Muhd Apr 3 '12 at 22:45
2  
Very useful. As an ex Firefox lover, I'm gutted that I have to do Firefox specific hacks like this but so long as it works I can live with it. –  SpaceBeers May 29 '12 at 9:56

Here is some browser hacks for targeting only the Firefox browser,

Using selector hacks.

_:-moz-tree-row(hover), .selector {}

JavaScript Hacks

var isFF = !!window.sidebar;

var isFF = 'MozAppearance' in document.documentElement.style;

var isFF = !!navigator.userAgent.match(/firefox/i);

Media Query Hacks

This is gonna work on, Firefox 3.6 and Later

@media screen and (-moz-images-in-menus:0) {}

If you need more information,Please visit browserhacks

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