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Possible Duplicates:
Flattening a shallow list in Python
Comprehension for flattening a sequence of sequences?

I wonder whether there is a shortcut to make a simple list out of list of lists in Python.

I can do that in a for loop, but maybe there is some cool "one-liner"? I tried it with reduce, but I get an error.

Code

l = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]
reduce(lambda x,y: x.extend(y),l)

Error message

Traceback (most recent call last): File "", line 1, in File "", line 1, in AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'extend'

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marked as duplicate by S.Lott, Paolo Bergantino, David Z, SilentGhost, dF. Jun 4 '09 at 22:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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There's an in-depth discussion of this here: rightfootin.blogspot.com/2006/09/more-on-python-flatten.html, discussing several methods of flattening arbitrarily nested lists of lists. An interesting read! –  RichieHindle Jun 4 '09 at 20:41
28  
Reopen this because it has the most concise answer of the duplicates, maybe it should be merged? –  Peer Stritzinger Sep 12 '11 at 14:09
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I agree with @PeerStritzinger, the top two answers in this one are more helpful than answers in the other three questions –  Izkata Feb 17 '12 at 20:07
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Some other answers are better but the reason yours fails is that the 'extend' method always returns None. For a list with length 2, it will work but return None. For a longer list, it will consume the first 2 args, which returns None. It then continues with None.extend(<third arg>), which causes this erro –  mehtunguh Jun 11 '13 at 21:48

8 Answers 8

up vote 704 down vote accepted

[item for sublist in l for item in sublist] is faster than the shortcuts posted so far.

For evidence, as always, you can use the timeit module in the standard library:

$ python -mtimeit -s'l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99' '[item for sublist in l for item in sublist]'
10000 loops, best of 3: 143 usec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s'l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99' 'sum(l, [])'
1000 loops, best of 3: 969 usec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s'l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99' 'reduce(lambda x,y: x+y,l)'
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.1 msec per loop

Explanation: the shortcuts based on + (including the implied use in sum) are, of necessity, O(L**2) when there are L sublists -- as the intermediate result list keeps getting longer, at each step a new intermediate result list object gets allocated, and all the items in the previous intermediate result must be copied over (as well as a few new ones added at the end). So (for simplicity and without actual loss of generality) say you have L sublists of I items each: the first I items are copied back and forth L-1 times, the second I items L-2 times, and so on; total number of copies is I times the sum of x for x from 1 to L excluded, i.e., I * (L**2)/2.

The list comprehension just generates one list, once, and copies each item over (from its original place of residence to the result list) also exactly once.

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9  
Editing the answer to show the evidence in a nicely formatted way and add the explanation. –  Alex Martelli Jun 4 '09 at 20:51
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I tried a test with the same data, using itertools.chain.from_iterable : $ python -mtimeit -s'from itertools import chain; l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99' 'list(chain.from_iterable(l))'. It runs a bit more than twice as fast as the nested list comprehension that's the fastest of the alternatives shown here. –  intuited Oct 15 '10 at 1:21
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I found the syntax hard to understand until I realized you can think of it exactly like nested for loops. for sublist in l: for item in sublist: yield item –  Rob Crowell Jul 27 '11 at 16:43
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I fondly call these things incomprehensible list comprehensions. –  wim Dec 15 '11 at 10:57
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@BorisChervenkov: Notice that I wrapped the call in list() to realize the iterator into a list. –  intuited May 20 '12 at 22:56

You can use itertools.chain():

>>> import itertools
>>> list2d = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]
>>> merged = list(itertools.chain(*list2d))

or, on Python >=2.6, use itertools.chain.from_iterable() which doesn't require unpacking the list:

>>> import itertools
>>> list2d = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]
>>> merged = list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(list2d))

This approach is arguably more readable than [item for sublist in l for item in sublist] and appears to be faster too:

[me@home]$ python -mtimeit -s'l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99;import itertools' 'list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(l))'
10000 loops, best of 3: 24.2 usec per loop
[me@home]$ python -mtimeit -s'l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99' '[item for sublist in l for item in sublist]'
10000 loops, best of 3: 45.2 usec per loop
[me@home]$ python -mtimeit -s'l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99' 'sum(l, [])'
1000 loops, best of 3: 488 usec per loop
[me@home]$ python -mtimeit -s'l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99' 'reduce(lambda x,y: x+y,l)'
1000 loops, best of 3: 522 usec per loop
[me@home]$ python --version
Python 2.7.3
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8  
That's the good way to do it. –  Thibaut D. Nov 13 '12 at 18:28
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And if someone wants to know why other solutions based on + operator (concatenation) are inefficient, see How not to Flatten a List of Lists –  Mathieu Jun 26 '13 at 18:26
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awesome, itertools are even faster than Martelli's lists –  qarma Sep 14 '13 at 15:29
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@ShawnChin BTW, piece of hardware you had when answering this question, my current workstation is half as fast and is been 4 years. –  Manuel Gutierrez Sep 24 '13 at 15:18
    
what does the * do? –  Alexandre Holden Daly Jul 23 at 17:49
>>> sum(l, [])
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

Note that only works on lists of lists. For lists of lists of lists, you'll need another solution.

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28  
What a cleverly implicit use of the overloaded (+) operator! –  Nick Retallack Jun 4 '09 at 20:39
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Thanks! This solution looks cool, and it's even shorter than with reduce. –  Emma Jun 4 '09 at 20:44
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that's pretty neat and clever but I wouldn't use it because it's confusing to read. –  andrewrk Jun 15 '10 at 18:55
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@curious: This just sums the elements of iterable passed in the first argument, treating second argument as the initial value of the sum (if not given, 0 is used instead and this case will give you an error). Because you are summing nested lists, you actually get [1,3]+[2,4] as a result of sum([[1,3],[2,4]],[]), which is equal to [1,3,2,4]. –  Tadeck Mar 23 '12 at 18:21
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This is a Shlemiel the painter's algorithm joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000319.html -- unnecessarily inefficient as well as unnecessarily ugly. –  Mike Graham Apr 25 '12 at 18:24

@Nadia: You have to use much longer lists. Then you see the difference quite strikingly! My results for len(l) = 1600

A took 14.323 ms
B took 13.437 ms
C took 1.135 ms

where:

A = reduce(lambda x,y: x+y,l)
B = sum(l, [])
C = [item for sublist in l for item in sublist]
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It only gets worse and worse, as the algorithmic complexity of A and B are different (worse) than that of C. –  Mike Graham Apr 25 '12 at 18:27
>>> l = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]
>>> reduce(lambda x,y: x+y,l)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

The extend() method in your example modifies x instead of returning a useful value (which reduce() expects).

A faster way to do the reduce version would be

>>> import operator
>>> l = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]
>>> reduce(operator.add, l)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
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posted the same but you were faster ! :P –  Andrea Ambu Jun 4 '09 at 20:39
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reduce(operator.add, l) would be the correct way to do the reduce version. Built-ins are faster than lambdas. –  agf Sep 24 '11 at 10:04
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@agf here is how: * timeit.timeit('reduce(operator.add, l)', 'import operator; l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]]', number=10000) 0.017956018447875977 * timeit.timeit('reduce(lambda x, y: x+y, l)', 'import operator; l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]]', number=10000) 0.025218963623046875 –  lukmdo Mar 20 '12 at 22:13
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This is a Shlemiel the painter's algorithm joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000319.html –  Mike Graham Apr 25 '12 at 18:26

I take my statement back. sum is not the winner. Although it is faster when the list is small. But the performance degrades significantly with larger lists.

>>> timeit.Timer(
        '[item for sublist in l for item in sublist]',
        'l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]] * 10000'
    ).timeit(100)
2.0440959930419922

The sum version is still running for more than a minute and it hasn't done processing yet!

For medium lists:

>>> timeit.Timer(
        '[item for sublist in l for item in sublist]',
        'l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]] * 10'
    ).timeit()
20.126545906066895
>>> timeit.Timer(
        'reduce(lambda x,y: x+y,l)',
        'l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]] * 10'
    ).timeit()
22.242258071899414
>>> timeit.Timer(
        'sum(l, [])',
        'l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]] * 10'
    ).timeit()
16.449732065200806

Using small lists and timeit: number=1000000

>>> timeit.Timer(
        '[item for sublist in l for item in sublist]',
        'l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]]'
    ).timeit()
2.4598159790039062
>>> timeit.Timer(
        'reduce(lambda x,y: x+y,l)',
        'l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]]'
    ).timeit()
1.5289170742034912
>>> timeit.Timer(
        'sum(l, [])',
        'l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]]'
    ).timeit()
1.0598428249359131
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11  
for a truly miniscule list, e.g. one with 3 sublists, maybe -- but since sum's performance goes with O(N**2) while the list comprehension's goes with O(N), just growing the input list a little will reverse things -- indeed the LC will be "infinitely faster" than sum at the limit as N grows. I was responsible for designing sum and doing its first implementation in the Python runtime, and I still wish I had found a way to effectively restrict it to summing numbers (what it's really good at) and block the "attractive nuisance" it offers to people who want to "sum" lists;-). –  Alex Martelli Jun 4 '09 at 21:07
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Alex, I ran the test again with much larger lists and you are right. Thanks for the correction! –  Nadia Alramli Jun 4 '09 at 21:19

The reason your function didn't work: the extend extends array in-place and doesn't return it. You can still return x from lambda, using some trick:

reduce(lambda x,y: x.extend(y) or x, l)

Note: extend is more efficient than + on lists.

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extend is better used as newlist = [], extend = newlist.extend, for sublist in l: extend(l) as it avoids the (rather large) overhead of the lambda, the attribute lookup on x, and the or. –  agf Sep 24 '11 at 10:12

Why do you use extend?

reduce(lambda x, y: x+y, l)

This should work fine
edit: greg was faster:P

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